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Old May 23rd, 2007, 09:38 PM   #1
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Support Systems?

Hi there, I have a canon GL2, and I want to get some kind of support system for it, mainly because.. to be honest.. I'm very weak, and holding the camera for longer than ten minutes gets annoying.

I'm planning on purchasing one off of ebay most likely, the ones I've seen on ebay seem to be made specifically for certain models. Now, the one i've seen the most, is made for the gl2, and other cameras, and it looks the same to me..

So Can I buy any support system, or do I have to buy something specifically made for my GL2.. Some of them on ebay don't specifiy a particular model. Also, any suggestions on what to look for on ebay would also be great.

Here's what I've found.. tell me if these are worth buying..

This first one says it is made for the gl2..
http://cgi.ebay.com/kamera-shoulder-...QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/Camcorder-Should...QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/Shoulder-Support...QQcmdZViewItem


And to add one more thing.. I am very tiny, lol. Seriously, I weight like 100 pounds, so will I be able to wear one of these support systems?
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Old May 23rd, 2007, 10:04 PM   #2
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Jenna, if I may suggest. A camera the size of a GL2 lends itself well to being used on a monopod. It gives you portability, and stability. And for brief moments, you can turn the LCD downward and get the camera up in the air to get over a crowd. I've used my Pana 953 on a monopod to get shots from the NAB show floor. I find it to be very versatile.

Just a thought,

-gb-
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Old May 23rd, 2007, 10:57 PM   #3
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But the problem is.. I have the tinest arms..no muscle.. besides working out.. lol, I would still like something to keep my arms from getting so tired..

I haven't used the camera very much, but I did film an ten minute set for a friends band, and my arm was getting so tired, and I was getting shakey.
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Old May 24th, 2007, 08:52 AM   #4
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A monopod is light in weight, small, and easy to carry. It's like a collapsible stick, with your camera attached to the top. The monopod supports the camera, and gives you the flexibility to pan and tilt as you need.
The contraptions you found on ebay rest on your body, adding weight. A monopod rests on the floor, removing the weight of the camera. Go to a local camera store and try out one or two monopods. I think you'll be better off with one than with a shoulder-mount support.
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Old May 24th, 2007, 10:05 AM   #5
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Hi Jenna,

You haven't told us what kind of Video you want to be doing (except for the Band). It would help to know, so we can offer better solutions.

If you are as weak as you say, then you may have difficulty using the Mono-Pod. Even though it "takes the weight", you still must have enough strength and stamana to hold it vertical, and not allow it to sway foreward and backward, side to side. Over time that can be difficult.

Those other devices take the weight and put it mostly to your body, but stability will still be an issue without sufficient strength and stamana.

Your best option may be a light and strong Tri-Pod, providing maximum stability and decent portability.

My wife has the same problem as you. A small Sony Tri-Pod with a Lanc Remote Control Handle (VCT-D680RM) works for her. It can be used as a Mono-Pod or a Tri-Pod.

Harold
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Old May 24th, 2007, 02:40 PM   #6
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I considered a monopod, but yes i thought it might be a but difficult to keep it from swaying back and forth. I'd like a support system that is supported by my body. It bothers me more to have to hold both my arms up to support the camera.. if i use one arm.. i get to shakey. I think I could handle carrying the weight on my body rather than leaving it to my arms.

The reason a tripod isn't what I am looking for, is because I want to have more freedom. I want to be able to do low shots without having to take my camera off of the monopod/tripod..it would just be a hassle..
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Old May 24th, 2007, 03:10 PM   #7
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Hi Jenna,

That Sony Tri-Pod I mentioned, is only about 20" tall in the closed position. That can get you pretty low.

If you use a decent "Quick Release" unit, then on and off a Pod is a snap.

All my different Pods, and my 4 Cams, use the same Quick Release units.

Any other support unit that is some how attached to you body (like a Chest-Pod, Shoulder Mount, etc.) will limit how low you can go.

Otherwise, you're looking at a hand-held unit which will give you the strength / stamana issues you now encounter.

Harold
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Old May 24th, 2007, 05:19 PM   #8
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Shoulder mounts (I had one a long time ago for my 150s) will push the weight of the camera even more forward than what it is now and the entire weight of it is now held by your arms which will tire you out very quickly.

A body type stabilizer will take some getting used too and frankly to get the low shots you can only lower the arm so low before it hits the stops. Actually a monopod is probably the best solution for a number or reasons.
1) it takes the weight of the camera from you and puts it on the floor
2) you have the ability to go from about 20 -22 inches low to about 65 inches high depending on the monopod you use
3) you can learn very quickly how to handle it so as not to sway-I even used mine once or twicee with my full sized camera
4) with some practice you can ALMOST (notice I said almost) get a glidecam type shot from a monopod
5) cost. The least expensive body type stabilizer of any value-one that will allow quality smooth shots with a good arm and sled and one that won't kick your butt after wearing it for a few hours is probably in the neighboorhood of a couple thousand dollars. I know there are units out there that are a bit less but for that type of thing you want to get the best one you can afford.
I won't mention any names but there are a couple of units out there that appear to be really good and a couple that aren't so much. The difference might be a few hundred dollors but in the case of a body type stabilizer you will get what you pay for.
At least in my opinion ;-)
Study your choices carefully and figure out what you are really trying to accomplish. Go thru the posts in the Support you camera forum and read everything you can about monopods and body type stabilizers then make your choice.

Good Luck

Don
(NOT a stedicam operator) ;-)
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Old May 25th, 2007, 07:26 PM   #9
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thanks for your suggestions guys. perhaps i will look into getting a monopod for now..but one concern is for doing a constant shot, since this is for a wedding, i don't want to mess up a great shot because I was to busy taking it off of the tripod or adjusting the height. But I really feel that if I just go hand held, I will ruin shots because i won't be steady enough, plus I won't be able to zoom if I want to do a close-up without ruining the shot..

So what should I look for in a monopod ?
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Old May 25th, 2007, 10:27 PM   #10
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Well first, if you are looking to do a complete ceremony on a monopod my suggestion is not to. Use a tripod. There are very few people that could hold a monopod perfectly still for a ceremony of even 15 or 20 minutes without some shake. I use a Bogen 682 which has outrigger legs and THAT has shake to it. Can't be helped-it's a one legged pole ;-)

For receptions the mobility of the monopod with a small camera can't be beat. You're able to get around the room and still hold the camera relativly shake free for the intorductions, toasts, cake, first dances AND you can bring it up over head and with some practice get some very nice crane type shots during the dancing. I'm short and for that reason alone I mss shooting with the small cameras.
Anyway what to look for? Some prefer the type that you press the handle and the leg extends, I prefer a locking device on the leg. I like the outrigger legs that I have available to use, others don't like them. I like my stuff to be black, some don't care. If you look at monopods you'll see the differnces almost immediately and I'm sure you'll find one suited to your taste.

Don
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Old May 25th, 2007, 10:41 PM   #11
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Hi Jenna,

What Don said !!

If doing a Wedding, USE a Tri-Pod !!!

If you get a good Quick Release unit mount, it takes maybe 3 seconds to dismount the Cam, or to remount it. So you won't be "busy" doing it.

Use the Mono-Pod for all the quick shots and mobile shots. Have the same Quick Release unit on both Pods.

Harold
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Old May 26th, 2007, 02:45 AM   #12
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I suppose I should use a tripod then, I was planning on trying to have a second camera set up in the back on a tripod.. so i only have one tripod.. (and it isn't anything fancy either) .. so I suppose I will invest in a second and better tripod..

any stores on ebay, or sellers that have good tripods.. and/or monopods, since I suppose I should go ahead and get both..

thanks for all your help guys!
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Old May 26th, 2007, 10:03 AM   #13
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Hi Jenna,

I certainly suggest having at least a Mono-Pod and a Tripod for a better range of Video activities.

If your fair city has any Camera/Photo or Video Shops, by all means go to them and check out what they offer.

Once you decide on what will work best for you, consider checking out on E-Bay or places like B&H Photo to see if you can get a better price.

Aside from my custom-built equipment, the Bogen/Manfrotto units have been good to me. I've even customized them too.

Harold
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