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Old August 23rd, 2008, 04:15 PM   #1
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Premiere Specific Tasks

I work with Premiere pro CS3. I use to use Premiere 4, which is much easier. I only want to use Preimere Pro because the more I use it, the better I'll get. Here are some tasks that I cannot find out how to do.

1. How do I lower the Music sound while specific clips are playing. I have video clips, with seperate audio(song-mp3)in audio 2. how can
I lower the sound of the song playing when a specific video file plays and then pick up to were the sound was?

2.How can I get the effect of a news report, with the news person talking and then a square to the side of them playing footage?

what other video blogging sites are out there other than youtube and vimeo? thank you very much
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Old August 23rd, 2008, 06:32 PM   #2
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There are several ways to do #1, but here's one of the easiest: Use the razor tool to slice the audio clip where you want the volume change to begin and end, then just drag the horizontal line in the audio clip down to where you want it. Apply cross fades at either end of the adjusted audio clip so the transition isn't sudden.

For #2, I'd just create a graphic with a clear background and move the graphic to where you want it in the frame, then lay it into your top available video track. Should just pop in wherever you want it.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 01:14 PM   #3
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thank you very much! the sound issue will help me allot!! by the way, were is the cross over button?
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Old August 25th, 2008, 01:37 PM   #4
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If you mean crossfades or audio dissolves, they are in your audio effects drop-down. Just drag on to, and center over, the cut.
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Old September 1st, 2008, 01:48 PM   #5
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If you mean crossfades or audio dissolves, they are in your audio effects drop-down. Just drag on to, and center over, the cut.
thanks for the help
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Old September 1st, 2008, 06:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Gold View Post
Use the razor tool to slice the audio clip where you want the volume change to begin and end, then just drag the horizontal line in the audio clip down to where you want it. Apply cross fades at either end of the adjusted audio clip so the transition isn't sudden.
Damn! That's brilliant! I never would have thought of that.
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Old September 1st, 2008, 07:29 PM   #7
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You don't have to cut the audio clip with the razor tool to change the audio level. Select the audio track, and move the current time indicator (CTI, you know, the playback head?) to where you want the volume to change. Now, mouse over to the left side of the timeline and click the diamond-shaped icon in the audio track head. This inserts a keyframe in the audio track, visible as a small diamond on the audio level line in the audio track. IMPORTANT NOTE: you MUST select the audio track in the timeline BEFORE you can set a keyframe. Then, press the right arrow key once to move ahead one frame (or however many frames you want) and set another keyframe. Now, use your mouse to move the volume level line to the right of the second keyframe either up or down.

Why would you do this rather than splitting the clip? Well, for one, there would be fewer individual clips in the timeline, reducing the chance that something might get misplaced or left out when moving or editing parts of the sequence. Secondly, you can have the volume change over a period of time, rather than just slamming from one setting to the next. If you want the volume to change uniformly over a half-second period, just put 15 frames between the two keypoints (assuming 29.97 FPS).

Thirdly, if you only want to alter the volume in a given segment of the clip, set two keypoints at the start, two more keypoints at the end, and then use the mouse to pull the volume line between the second and third keypoints. Everything before the first keypoint and after the fourth keypoint remain unchanged.

Now, if you decide to move that clip to another place on the timeline, then all you have to do is move one clip, and not two or three razored sections.

Martin
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Old September 2nd, 2008, 12:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Catt View Post
mouse over to the left side of the timeline and click the diamond-shaped icon in the audio track head. This inserts a keyframe in the audio track, visible as a small diamond on the audio level line in the audio track. IMPORTANT NOTE: you MUST select the audio track in the timeline BEFORE you can set a keyframe..
Just hold down the Ctrl key and click on the audio rubberband to create a keyframe. The audio does not need to be active.

There's advantages to either way of fading audio, try both and see what works for you.
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Old September 2nd, 2008, 06:53 PM   #9
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Just hold down the Ctrl key and click on the audio rubberband to create a keyframe. The audio does not need to be active.

There's advantages to either way of fading audio, try both and see what works for you.
Welcome to the World of Adobe, where there are fifty ways to accomplish a single task, and they'll sell you another application that will give you fifty more ways.

Regards;
Martin
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Old September 2nd, 2008, 09:20 PM   #10
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wow thanks Martin, I'll try out that method. im learning premiere pro little by little. Whst do you guys think of the premiere pro, classroom in a book?
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Old September 3rd, 2008, 02:39 AM   #11
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There's no need to drag audio fades to clips, just make sure you have targeted your audio track, park the playhead near beginning or end of an audio clip and press the shortcut for audio transition (i think it's CTRL ALT D).

If you prefer automatic ducking (making background music quieter when there's a voiceover), it can be done too: A quick tutorial on automatic audio ducking in Premiere : Adobe Premiere Pro

Or use Premiere's audiomixer, that's usually quicker and easier than drawing a timeline full of keyframes.
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Old September 3rd, 2008, 04:40 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Victor Guzman View Post
wow thanks Martin, I'll try out that method. im learning premiere pro little by little. Whst do you guys think of the premiere pro, classroom in a book?
The book's not bad -- certainly better than the manual that came with the software. Adobe manuals seem to be written from the point of view that you already know the software, and just need a reminder.

Spending some time at lynda.com helps a lot. I got a free 30-day subscription when I bought CS3, and I spent a lot of time going through their Premiere training videos, one after the other. In particular, I needed it for Encore, whose manual is probably worse than anything Microsoft ever wrote. I don't think I would have ever figured out the DVD menuing system in Encore without outside help.

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Old September 4th, 2008, 08:43 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Jiri Fiala View Post
There's no need to drag audio fades to clips, just make sure you have targeted your audio track, park the playhead near beginning or end of an audio clip and press the shortcut for audio transition (i think it's CTRL ALT D).

If you prefer automatic ducking (making background music quieter when there's a voiceover), it can be done too: A quick tutorial on automatic audio ducking in Premiere : Adobe Premiere Pro

Or use Premiere's audiomixer, that's usually quicker and easier than drawing a timeline full of keyframes.
thanks for the link and info!! your awesome
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Old September 4th, 2008, 10:05 PM   #14
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Hey Victor, I don't want to beat a dead horse, but personally, i like to go to the far left audio track, select the desired track, twirl down the arrow, and supersize the audio track to give you lots of space..

Press the P for Pen tool. You can enter desired keyframes by pressing control and left clicking. You can start manipulating the keyframes by simply dragging the points..

You can even go as far as Ctrl clicking individual keyframes to give you Bezier handles, and getting wonky results..

Lots of options my friend...
BTW, cross fading between two audio clips is Shift>Ctrl>D altogether..So long as you have the correct track on the far left selected..
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Old September 5th, 2008, 09:03 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Peter Manojlovic View Post
Hey Victor, I don't want to beat a dead horse, but personally, i like to go to the far left audio track, select the desired track, twirl down the arrow, and supersize the audio track to give you lots of space..

Press the P for Pen tool. You can enter desired keyframes by pressing control and left clicking. You can start manipulating the keyframes by simply dragging the points..

You can even go as far as Ctrl clicking individual keyframes to give you Bezier handles, and getting wonky results..

Lots of options my friend...
BTW, cross fading between two audio clips is Shift>Ctrl>D altogether..So long as you have the correct track on the far left selected..
cool! good pic
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