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Old July 23rd, 2005, 11:23 PM   #1291
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A Raid array is several hard drives that are set up to work as one large drive. There are several types of raid setups, the best being a mirrored raid, where you have copies of your data in case one drive goes bad.
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Old July 24th, 2005, 05:19 AM   #1292
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Dylan,

Figure on appx 13 gigs per hour of standard DV. So 80 gigs will hold about six hours of footage.

Obviously, swapping the drives would give you more storage for your media. Use the 80 gig for the C drive, the 160 for media.

If you do not feel tech savvy enough, to swap drives and reboot systems, you've probably got enough to get you started. You can simply buy additional 'external' drives as you need them and hook them up by firewire.
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Old July 24th, 2005, 01:02 PM   #1293
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Hi Donald,

That is a bit strange.

I take it if you were to export out as an AVI or WMV file it would play back OK?

Have you tried playing the QT file on a separate PC?

Does it always do it at the same point? If so is there anything major happening in the video at the point (effects etc)?

Just a few things to try...
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Old July 24th, 2005, 01:13 PM   #1294
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Hi Monty,

As per Adobes min spec:

1,280x1,024 32-bit color video display adapter (OpenGL card recommended)

This basically emplys any modern video card whether it be AGP or PCI-express.

The things that are most important to Premiere (in terms of hardware) is the processor and how much RAM you put in the machine. Premiere does not really use the GPU to increase its performance.

Take a look at adobes sepc:
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs.html

Yes Adobe do have a user forum. Just search the support page on there website. You can also use this forum!

Cheers,
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Old July 24th, 2005, 06:00 PM   #1295
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Yes, I'm able to export avi and mpeg. When I tried the different QT presets the problem happened at different points. I'll still play around w/ it.
 
Old July 24th, 2005, 10:44 PM   #1296
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16x9 templates?

ok, i shot a wedding in 16x9...and i opened up a project in premier set for 16x9 video. i want to use one of the standard wedding templates but i dont want it to be in 16x9. do i have to open a template up in a 4x3 project, export as a frame, then import back in as a still...or what? if i did that then i wouldnt get any animation on the graphic...so im confused.
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Last edited by Jared Thomas; July 25th, 2005 at 11:46 AM.
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Old July 26th, 2005, 11:44 AM   #1297
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Help with Premier's Alpha Glow

I can't seem to get Alpha Glow in Premiere 6.5 to work.
Could any kind soul take me through using Alpha Glow step by step. For the life of me I can't seem to get it to work. Premiere's on-line help is not very specific. And I've tried another Forum with zero response.
I just want to give an overall soft whitening to the image with a bit of a glow to it...I can get the soft whitening OK but not the glow...

I have Premiere 6.5 with CanopusRT2 on a P4 with plenty of everything.
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Old July 26th, 2005, 12:35 PM   #1298
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Hi Mike,

You might find this previous thread of interest.

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...ght=alpha+glow

Although this is mentioned for PP, it should be the same for P6.5

Hope this helps,
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Old July 27th, 2005, 01:26 AM   #1299
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In Post, How can I convert a 4:3 Image to 16:9?

I have a Canon Gl2, I want to shoot in 4:3 to have the best quality image and then somehow convert the image to 16:9. I am aware that in Adobe Premier I can goto "add titles" and place black bars at the bottom and top to create quasi 16:9. What I really want to do is reformat the image so that it will play as 16:9 on a widescreen TV, I don't want a stretched image (adding bar in titles still will stretch the image).

So, ideally I want to make this conversion so that my DVD authoring program will accept my footage as genuine 16:9. What program can do this 4:3 to 16:9 conversion for the PC? Thanks a bunch!
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Old July 27th, 2005, 02:22 AM   #1300
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Thanks Ed. I'll give Pete Bauer's suggestions a go. Nice to kow I'm not alone in finding Alpha Glow difficult.

Cheers

Mike
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Old July 27th, 2005, 08:39 AM   #1301
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To convert your 4:3 footage to 16:9 you will need to start a new project in Premiere and choose 16:9 as the aspect ratio. Then, import your 4:3 footage and scale it up to fill the whole 16:9 frame. You will lose the some of the top and bottom of the 4:3 frame when you do this, so watch for things like people's heads getting lopped off at the top. You can move your video up and down to compensate for this.

Quote:
I have a Canon Gl2, I want to shoot in 4:3 to have the best quality image and then somehow convert the image to 16:9.
Since you have to blow up the 4:3 footage to fit it inside a 16:9 frame, you are still losing quality. Sometime ago I read that Canon's camcorders were among the better ones shooting 16:9 video, even though they only had 4:3 CCDs (this was before Canonís newest camcorder, the XL2, which does have 16:9 CCDs). If that is the case you may just be better off shooting 16:9 to begin with, since that is your final product anyway. You could easily perform an experiment to find out which shooting method gives you the best image quality.
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Old July 27th, 2005, 02:19 PM   #1302
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Sequence Question

Can somebody explain the purpose of breaking up a long project between multiple sequences? Is this so you won't have one long timeline to navigate through? How do you get the sequences to connect when your project is finished?
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Last edited by Hugh DiMauro; July 27th, 2005 at 02:20 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old July 27th, 2005, 04:56 PM   #1303
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There are many uses for Premiere Pro's sequences. It all depends on the project and your editing preferences. Here are some that I can think of.

To take your example, if you're working on a particular project that is quite complex, it could simplify the timeline to break it up into separate sequences. To put all the separate sequences together you just drop them into another sequence. A sequence placed in another sequence behaves just like a video clip; you can edit it, and apply any transitions or effects you want to it.

For another example, let's say you're editing a conference. You could edit each session in it's own sequence. Then you could build the opening and closing titles/graphics in their own sequences, and drop them into each sessionís sequence. Should you decide to make a change to the opening or closing, it will then be updated in every sequence it is used.

On longer, more complex projects I usually capture multiple tapes (on my current project I have at least ten tapes captured). Placing the contents of each tape on it's own sequence makes it much easier to scan through my footage to locate the shots I need. It also makes it easier to assemble certain scenes in one place (behind the scenes bloopers, etc).

Another use for multiple sequences would be to put together several different cuts for a certain section of your project. With each cut in it's own sequence you could then easily swap the different versions in and out of your main timeline.
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Old July 27th, 2005, 04:56 PM   #1304
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh DiMauro
Can somebody explain the purpose of breaking up a long project between multiple sequences? Is this so you won't have one long timeline to navigate through? How do you get the sequences to connect when your project is finished?
You pretty much nailed it. Obviously, your method of editing is purely your own choice, but some people (myself included) feel that breaking a long project up into sequences simplifies things by making it much easier to find things. The nice part about sequences in Premiere Pro is that you can nest them. That means that if you open a new sequence, you can drag and drop another sequence into that sequence. That way, all the clips and edits you have from one sequence just show up as one long clip in its parent sequence. Again, there is no right or wrong way to do things. It's simply a matter of personal preference.

Hope that all made sense.

EDIT: You beat me to it Christopher.
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Old July 27th, 2005, 05:02 PM   #1305
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Brent,

Looks like we were both posting at the same time! The more information, the better.
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