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Old June 19th, 2006, 11:35 AM   #1
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audio levels equal across the entire timeline

I am new to Premiere Pro 1.0 and I have a quick question about audio.

My project has voice-over and interview tracks. Is there a way to get the audio levels equal across the entire timeline? I don't want the voice-over to be louder than the interview audio or vise versa. Is there a quick method to doing this? Any help would be fantastic.

Thanks and cheers, Jon
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Old June 30th, 2006, 08:27 PM   #2
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Best bet is not instant answer.

It has been a while since I used 1.0 but I think it has this option. Right click your audio and go to audio gain. Click on Normalize. If you do this on each audio clip it should equal out. Well, at least it will kind of do it. It is definitely not perfect.
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Old July 3rd, 2006, 11:05 AM   #3
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What normalising does is raise the volume of the audio clip so that the loudest sound is at 0dB (or close). But it certainly won't equalize your clips.
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Old July 3rd, 2006, 12:41 PM   #4
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Maybe you could output the audio only to a wave then silence the audio clips. Import the ouputed audio and normalize it. It should give a fair result but if you use Audition on the exported .wav you'll get a better result since you have more controls there.
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Old July 3rd, 2006, 05:26 PM   #5
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Jon,

You can use the Audio Mixer. That allows you to control everything on each track with one fader, just like a hardware audio mixer. All the clips on each track should have their levels set relative to one another already, right? Then you can use the Audio Mixer to raise everything in a track by the same amount.

So if you have your voice over in track 1, and your interview stuf in track 2, you can raise the level of track 1 and lower the level of track 2 in the audio mixer (or vice versa) to get the balance between them that you want.

Have fun!

Rob
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Old July 4th, 2006, 12:37 AM   #6
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Thank you all for responding to my question. I have been away from the computer and to come back to see so many people tossing ideas into the discussion is great.

I will try all the ideas presented and I will report back.

This message board is wondeful. Thanks again for the help.

Cheers!!
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