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Old November 16th, 2006, 09:12 PM   #1
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PP2 Burn to DVD Question

I have a wedding video that is 1 hour, 50 min's long in PP2 and when I click burn to DVD it says the disk has insufficent disk space. The file is 6.66 MB.
It says PP2 only supports single-layer 4.7GB disks. I do have a dual layer burner. How can I get this on one DVD? Thanks.
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Old November 16th, 2006, 09:22 PM   #2
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Al-

Adobe Encore 1.5.1 will allow you to burn dual layer.

http://www.adobe.com/support/downloa...jsp?ftpID=2663

You can download the trial version of encore 2.0 - You can export your wedding video to AVI then burn it to dual layer in encore 2.0.

Hope that helps...
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Old November 17th, 2006, 04:58 AM   #3
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Tim, Thanks for the info. How do I export to AVI? Is that done in PP2 or Encore? Thanks
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Old November 17th, 2006, 06:34 AM   #4
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File>Export Movie>

Click on settings

File Type = Microsoft DV AVI

Good luck
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Old November 17th, 2006, 01:11 PM   #5
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Al,

something is wrong with your picture. A 6.66 MB file can only hold a few seconds of video, not almost two hours.

One other thing: for PPRO to burn your video to a DVDisk, it first has to encode it to MPEG - and it does that by creating a file on your hard drive. The error message "disk has insufficient space" might just refer to your hard drive being almost full.

As far as the burner goes, do you have the right driver? Is your burner working fine with another burning software like Nero or whatever you got when you bought it?
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Old November 17th, 2006, 03:48 PM   #6
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Al,
If you just want a simple DVD, creating it directly from Premiere 2.0 is fine... assuming it can fit on a single-layer DVD (4.37 Gigabytes, or 4.7 billion bytes).

Your DVD will hold more video and allow higher video bitrates if you compress the audio to Dolby AC-3 or MPEG audio (which is supported in PAL regions). Of course, a double-layer DVD will hold almost twice as much content, and allow for better video bitrates (and quality)... almost 8 Gigabytes, or 8.5 Billion bytes.

If you want to create dual-layer DVDs, and/or higher quality DVDs, with more elaborate menus, buttons, and navigation options, you will need a DVD authoring program. There are a number of different programs available, such as Adobe Encore, or Sonic Solutions DVDit! Professional.

One way or another, your video needs to end up in DVD-Video format (MPEG-2). This can either happen from within Premiere (using the included MPEG-2 encoder or a plug-in), a stand-alone MPEG-2 encoder such as CinemaCraft, Canopus, or Main Concept, or within a DVD Authoring program that includes an MPEG-2 encoder.

Some authoring programs can help you calculate your "bit budget" automatically. It isn't too difficult to calculate manually, adding up the bitrate of the video, audio, and subpicture streams, multiplied by the run-time to get the total size of the content. You have to allow a bit of room for the information and backup files (IFO and BUP)... but they are very small in comparison to the Video Object (VOB) files that hold all of the actual content. Your one hour and 50 minute wedding video would need a video bitrate under 4 megabits per second in order to fit on a single layer DVD... assuming the audio is uncompressed PCM. You could use a video bitrate of slightly more than 8 Megabits per second if you write to a dual-layer DVD.

I hope this helps you.
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Old November 23rd, 2006, 04:02 AM   #7
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Superb

Tom, thanks for the excellent answer. I found it quite useful too. Such a clear answer with no room for misinterpretation helps immensely in wading through the mire that is digital bitrates and compression codecs for DV. And Ervin I think he must have meant 6.66 GB- only reasonable answer. Cheers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Vaughan
Al,
If you just want a simple DVD, creating it directly from Premiere 2.0 is fine... assuming it can fit on a single-layer DVD (4.37 Gigabytes, or 4.7 billion bytes).

Your DVD will hold more video and allow higher video bitrates if you compress the audio to Dolby AC-3 or MPEG audio (which is supported in PAL regions). Of course, a double-layer DVD will hold almost twice as much content, and allow for better video bitrates (and quality)... almost 8 Gigabytes, or 8.5 Billion bytes.

If you want to create dual-layer DVDs, and/or higher quality DVDs, with more elaborate menus, buttons, and navigation options, you will need a DVD authoring program. There are a number of different programs available, such as Adobe Encore, or Sonic Solutions DVDit! Professional.

One way or another, your video needs to end up in DVD-Video format (MPEG-2). This can either happen from within Premiere (using the included MPEG-2 encoder or a plug-in), a stand-alone MPEG-2 encoder such as CinemaCraft, Canopus, or Main Concept, or within a DVD Authoring program that includes an MPEG-2 encoder.

Some authoring programs can help you calculate your "bit budget" automatically. It isn't too difficult to calculate manually, adding up the bitrate of the video, audio, and subpicture streams, multiplied by the run-time to get the total size of the content. You have to allow a bit of room for the information and backup files (IFO and BUP)... but they are very small in comparison to the Video Object (VOB) files that hold all of the actual content. Your one hour and 50 minute wedding video would need a video bitrate under 4 megabits per second in order to fit on a single layer DVD... assuming the audio is uncompressed PCM. You could use a video bitrate of slightly more than 8 Megabits per second if you write to a dual-layer DVD.

I hope this helps you.
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