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Old September 21st, 2007, 03:04 PM   #1
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How to get stereo sound using a lavalier microphone

I'm looking to purchase the new Canon XH-A1 for my company and am in dire need of direction in the audio department. What is the best way to record audio, lavalier, shotgun...etc? We are planning on creating short segments in a mockumentary style fashion. Can you record in stereo on a lav mic or do you have to mix it to make the audio stereo? Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

Patrick
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Old September 21st, 2007, 03:40 PM   #2
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I can't think of a good reason why you would need to record a vocal in stereo for a mockumentary.

The final stereo imaging should be done in post. Concentrate in getting good initial recordings w/ good mics, portable Mixer, and eventually plan to upgrade to a 24 bit multitrack recorder.

A good boom mic will make a world of difference. You will still need body lavs because of the nature of the show. And the signal needs to go through a mixer w/ good mic premamps w/ quality limiters.

Suggested Starting point:
1) 302 Sound devices mixer, Petrol harness, headphones
2) SHOTGUNS: Schoeps CMIT 5U, or Sanken CS3, or Sennheiser 416
3) HyperCardioid Mic for certain Interiors: AKG blue series, or AT 4053, or Schoeps if you have the bugdet
4) LAVS: Sanken cos 11, Countryman B6
Wireless system (Lectronics, Sennheiser, or AT dual system) & Breakaway cable to camera
5) Boom pole & accessaries (blimp, shockmount)

Isolate the boom mic to one track and the lav to the other.
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Old September 21st, 2007, 04:10 PM   #3
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Audio is a very complex art and it's smart to get advice. Two classic books that cover the basics and more are by Jay Rose: Great Sound for Digital Video
and Audio for Postproduction. They are a few years old, and don't cover some of the latest hard drive recorders etc. but, the advice is solid and covers recording in most situations, cables, mics and gear. You won't go wrong with these textbooks.

Last edited by Michael Van Osterhoudt; September 21st, 2007 at 06:06 PM.
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Old September 21st, 2007, 05:41 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Boda View Post
I can't think of a good reason why you would need to record a vocal in stereo for a mockumentary.

The final stereo imaging should be done in post. Concentrate in getting good initial recordings w/ good mics, portable Mixer, and eventually plan to upgrade to a 24 bit multitrack recorder.

A good boom mic will make a world of difference. You will still need body lavs because of the nature of the show. And the signal needs to go through a mixer w/ good mic premamps w/ quality limiters.

Suggested Starting point:
1) 302 Sound devices mixer, Petrol harness, headphones
2) SHOTGUNS: Schoeps CMIT 5U, or Sanken CS3, or Sennheiser 416
3) HyperCardioid Mic for certain Interiors: AKG blue series, or AT 4053, or Schoeps if you have the bugdet
4) LAVS: Sanken cos 11, Countryman B6
Wireless system (Lectronics, Sennheiser, or AT dual system) & Breakaway cable to camera
5) Boom pole & accessaries (blimp, shockmount)

Isolate the boom mic to one track and the lav to the other.

Jim's advice is spot on. The only thing I'd add is Sony MDR7506 headphones and maybe swap out the AKG Blue hyper for an Audix SCX-1.

Regards,

Ty Ford
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Old September 22nd, 2007, 03:42 PM   #5
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If you use Sound Forge software, there is a good plugin that allows you to "recreate" stereo sounds from a mono recording. You need to record a "hall acoustic impulse" first - it comes with several well known concert halls, normal room, open air areas, etc ... If you don't have the technical ability to create the acoustic impluses of your recording area - it is not that difficult -you can use the examples provided to approximate the place of your recording.

It will never match the real stereo recording done at that place, but - it is pretty good - and can be used as a stand in for a rainy day.
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