Getting ready for Replication...audio levels ? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 21st, 2007, 03:30 PM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Northwest Oregon
Posts: 11
Getting ready for Replication...audio levels ?

I'm getting ready to send my DVD in for replication (www.discmakers.com) and am concerned that my audio levels are not consistent throughout the DVD. We filmed outdoors over a six month period and had problems with our wireless lav among other things. During post production we tried to work with the levels but I'm still not happy with it. Listening to the DVD on my home surround sound system I could definetly hear the changing audio levels. For $500 Discmakers have an option called Soundlab mastering that should take care of this problem. Is there anyone with experience in this situation?

Thanks in advance.

Mark
__________________
If it's petty don't sweat it...If it's sweaty, don't pet it.
Mark Anderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2007, 09:29 PM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 3,259
Mark, I'm not familiar with what diskmakers is doing, exactly, but, if you've unhappy with changing levels and they offer a "mastering" service that you can afford it would probably be a good idea.

You might want to confirm with them exactly what they'll do. Perhaps they could send you back the mastered DVD before you commit to replication.

Alternatively, you could work with a local studio or audio engineer on the project and probably get more of an education in the process.
Seth Bloombaum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 10:25 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 152
Don't send to replicate until you are satisfied. Hire a post production sound editor or dialog editor to clean up your audio.
Brooks Harrington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 11:52 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Anderson View Post
<Clip>...concerned that my audio levels are not consistent throughout the DVD. We filmed outdoors over a six month period and had problems with our wireless lav among other things.
<Clip>
Thanks in advance.

Mark
Hi Mark,

Not knowing more specifics, it's a bit difficult to give more than general advise on how to resolve your changing audio level problems. You mentioned that you "tried to work with the levels" - ostensibly you might have gone through brute force techniques (compression, equalizations, normalization, etc) as well as manual processes (tweaking amplitute on problem areas). Of course, some problems cannot be fixed regardless of the sound engineer - bad signal-to-noise ratio, interference, clipping, etc.

Perhaps if attached a snippet of your problem audio (MP3 or WAV) or described in detail what's objectionable about the changing audio level and your "problems with your lavaliers", we could be more helpful.

Good luck, Michael
Michael Nistler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 01:14 PM   #5
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Northwest Oregon
Posts: 11
Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply. This project is a DVD that included lots of on river filming intergrated with time sitting at the tying vise showing how to tie steelhead jigs. The problem with the audio levels is that the segments we filmed sitting at the vise the audio levels are considerably lower then the on river filming. Watching the DVD it's very noticeable. The gentleman doing the post production work for me tried his best to make the transistion from the vise to the river as smooth as possible but I'm concerned that it will still be noticeable.

This is my first project and from reading all the input from the experts on this forum I know that audio is one of the most important aspects of a film so I'm inclined to spend the money to ensure it's done right but wanted to get opinions from others first.

Mark
__________________
If it's petty don't sweat it...If it's sweaty, don't pet it.
Mark Anderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 03:57 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Iowa City, Iowa
Posts: 670
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Anderson View Post

This is my first project and from reading all the input from the experts on this forum I know that audio is one of the most important aspects of a film so I'm inclined to spend the money to ensure it's done right but wanted to get opinions from others first.

Mark
Mark,

If you know with certainty that the Soundlab mastering service will take care of your audio issues, then $500 is a bargain (especially if this is for a retail DVD). If you have the time yourself, it would be well spent learning how to get your audio consistent and listenable.

At the very least it will ensure a better viewing/listening experience and give you a more professional product.

I've never regretted putting time/money into mastering; but I DO have regrets about projects where I was sloppy or cut corners. Those things can come back to haunt you.
__________________
youtube.com/benhillmedia
linkedin.com/in/benhillmedia
Benjamin Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 09:54 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 152
I look at the Disc maker website and could only find references to Soundlab mastering concerning CDs. I think this is different. Yes, mastering can help you, but I think you want to remix first. Have you processed with noise reduction, EQ, gates, limiters and ambience to get the audio to match?
Which software did you use?
Brooks Harrington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2007, 11:43 PM   #8
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Northwest Oregon
Posts: 11
Banjamin

This is my thoughts exactly. I'd rather take the extra time/money and make sure it's done right then put it out to market and have regrets later.

Brooks

Thanks for replying. I didn't do the actual post production work myself so I can't tell you the specifics as far as noise reduction or other work invloved.

Thanks

Mark
__________________
If it's petty don't sweat it...If it's sweaty, don't pet it.
Mark Anderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2007, 12:09 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 456
Hi Mark,

Hmm, I get the impression that whomever tweaked the audio either wasn't qualified or needed give enough time/attention to your project. And since this isn't your forte, yes, it certainly will be a good investment to have the replication service first provide mastering service. You don't want to replicate with such critical problems (I'm assuming it's 10db+ of audio variation).

I recommend you have DiskMakers provide you a draft DVD (MP3, etc) of their audio mastering before cutting a replication disk. Better yet, inform DiskMasters of particular problem areas before they correct the problematic audio areas.

Happy Trails, Michael
Michael Nistler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2007, 09:44 AM   #10
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Northwest Oregon
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nistler View Post
Hi Mark,

Hmm, I get the impression that whomever tweaked the audio either wasn't qualified or needed give enough time/attention to your project. And since this isn't your forte, yes, it certainly will be a good investment to have the replication service first provide mastering service. You don't want to replicate with such critical problems (I'm assuming it's 10db+ of audio variation).

I recommend you have DiskMakers provide you a draft DVD (MP3, etc) of their audio mastering before cutting a replication disk. Better yet, inform DiskMasters of particular problem areas before they correct the problematic audio areas.

Happy Trails, Michael
Michael

Thanks for your reply. I contacted disc makers and they will provide me a master for testing before they replicate. I feel confident they will adjust, tweek, compress, etc. the audio so it should be fine.

Mark
__________________
If it's petty don't sweat it...If it's sweaty, don't pet it.
Mark Anderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 24th, 2007, 04:25 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 456
Perfect - that's one of several instances where it's nice to have a single vendor take care of several post-production activities including editing, replication, etc.

Let us know how it all worked out.

Warm Regards, Michael
Michael Nistler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2007, 11:55 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: New York
Posts: 127
So what happened? I'm curious.

I hate cliffhangers in forums.
Anna Harmon is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:10 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network