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Old February 8th, 2008, 03:27 PM   #1
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Voice only recorders?

I need something to record voice only interviews and dont want to have to use my Canon XH-A1's to record them.

What kind of set up would you recomend, and how do you download the audio files from this setup?

Thanks
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Old February 8th, 2008, 03:31 PM   #2
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Wild sound only, no picture?

What is the expected use of the recording?
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:05 PM   #3
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Wild sound only, no picture?

What is the expected use of the recording?

Audio will be for background in wedding DVD.
I was also asked to tape the audo at a memorial, but they wanted it done with out anyone knowing. The memorial was an hour and 45 mins, using a HD Cam is a pain, I want a way to capture Audio Only.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:14 PM   #4
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I use an Olympus voice recorder for that. It records to WMV file. Check amazon for the price.

There is also the Zoom H2 which is a more decent portable microphone record to SD card.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:57 PM   #5
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I use an Olympus voice recorder for that. It records to WMV file. Check amazon for the price.

There is also the Zoom H2 which is a more decent portable microphone record to SD card.
Thanks here are a few I am looking at.
Tascam DP-02CF
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=534310&is=REG

Fostex MR8
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=414598&is=REG

Boss BR-600
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=421044&is=REG

Tascam DP01fx
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=354676&is=REG
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Old February 8th, 2008, 05:00 PM   #6
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Zoom H2 or H4, m-Audio Microtrak II, Edirol R-09, there's a bunch of others ranging upwards in price from there. The little hand-held dictation recorders aren't likely to give decent sound and usually use non-standard audio formats so getting the tracks into your editor will prove a PITA.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 05:29 PM   #7
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The Microtrack is very small, excellent quality sound, and it will take balanced or unbalanced (1/8" input) mics. Very good, and the new version with the limiter is even better.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...arch&Q=*&bhs=t
I think the Microtrack is the smallest there is and it is easy to hide in an inside jacket pocket. I also use it with an SD302, recording off the auxillary output.

It doesn't have some of the outside controls the larger units have, but it does everything you need.

We also use an Olympus DS-50. It will take a 1/8" mic (as well and the plug-on that comes with it and a built in mic). It is thin and small and easy to use:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Recorder.html

It comes with a special program for downloading the files. This is perfect for a reporter or similar, but the quality of the sound with the good mic and right placement is also excellent.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 07:02 PM   #8
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Ok, found a couple more that may be the ticket. This first one has a hard drive and CF card for backup. a little pricy but may be the best choice.

Edirol/Roland
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=356881&is=REG

Fostex
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...2_Channel.html

Marantz PMD-670
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Recorder.html

Some things I want if I am going to spend any amount on one of these is
1- a decent size LED, I don't have 18 year old eyes anymore
2- unless I am mistaken the XLR mic inputs are the way to go.

Would love any opinions on all the above mentioned.
Denny
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Old February 8th, 2008, 07:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny Kyser View Post
I need something to record voice only interviews and dont want to have to use my Canon XH-A1's to record them.

What kind of set up would you recomend, and how do you download the audio files from this setup?

Thanks
I don't have any. I had a Sony minidisc recorder at some point but its head got misaligned while being cleaned, then I used it as a mic preamp for a while and then I threw it away in disgrace. Soon after Sony announced they'd no longer do minidisc. And more recently they do minidisc again, this time with wav and Internet... something to check.

Then there's Korg MR-1 recording 1bit format at 2 (or 5 is that) MHz sampling frequency, on hdd. Looks very thin, and promises a high-quality AD.

One commenter said MicroTRack may be the smallest, but by my readings of spec sheets the Korg seems smallest. But it has no internal mic, but easy to add a T-shaped outside mic.

One seller tries to compare many current handheld recorders, I think it's called wingfieldaudio.com or so.
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Old February 9th, 2008, 07:34 AM   #10
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Portable recorder comparisons

Compare the various ones here:

http://www.wingfieldaudio.com/portab...d-samples.html

I've seen the Roland R09 and heard high-quality wav files from this machine and it is amazing. This http://tinyurl.com/2mxpmc is a 30-second recording in WAV format so it's quite big. It was taken during a harp workshop just walking round with the recorder using the internal mics. A great machine to have as it's so tiny.

The Zoom H2 can record in surround sound but the audio quality is not quite as good as the Roland R09

The Microtrack has an internal battery which has to be recharged - it doesn't take standard rechargeables

None of them have XLR inputs but I believe the Microtrack has an adaptor you can buy which provides phantom power, but only at low current (too low for some mics to work properly)

Check that your machine can sync to video reasonably well - apparently some of them will be out by about 1 second over the space of 30 mins (I read this somewhere but can't remember which machine).
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Old February 9th, 2008, 09:33 AM   #11
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Compare the various ones here:

http://www.wingfieldaudio.com/portab...d-samples.html

I've seen the Roland R09 and heard high-quality wav files from this machine and it is amazing. This http://tinyurl.com/2mxpmc is a 30-second recording in WAV format so it's quite big. It was taken during a harp workshop just walking round with the recorder using the internal mics. A great machine to have as it's so tiny.

The Zoom H2 can record in surround sound but the audio quality is not quite as good as the Roland R09

The Microtrack has an internal battery which has to be recharged - it doesn't take standard rechargeables

None of them have XLR inputs but I believe the Microtrack has an adaptor you can buy which provides phantom power, but only at low current (too low for some mics to work properly)

Check that your machine can sync to video reasonably well - apparently some of them will be out by about 1 second over the space of 30 mins (I read this somewhere but can't remember which machine).
Thanks for all that information, I believe I have it down to 3 to choose after your post.

The R09, Zoom H4 and the Microtac II
The really have great sound and I believe the H4 even has the XLR mic inputs, although I am not sure how big of a deal that really is.

Thanks again for all the help.
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Old February 9th, 2008, 11:51 AM   #12
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Portable recorders

They sound like great choices, Danny.

You might wish to check a couple of things:

The Zoom H4 has apparently had problems with low-level interference noises when running on batteries - you might want to Google for this problem. I also gather it's more limited in terms of how much it can record on cards - again you may need to check this as it's a much earlier model than the H2.

By the way the MicroTrack II apparently has the proper level of phantom power and can run any studio mics - so they've improved this aspect since making the MicroTrack I. You do have to have an adaptor but I don't know if the 1/4" to XLR adaptor you can get for the Microtrack is a special one or just one you can make up yourself from bits (to provide the phantom power).

Whichever you go for, it's great to have something with no moving parts!!
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Old February 9th, 2008, 12:23 PM   #13
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The Microtrack doesn't have XLR connectors, but it has 1/4" jacks instead.

The connection is identical, that is it is a balanced input. To plug in an XLR mic you only need an adapter to go from XLR to 1/4".

On the Microtrack, the 1/4" jack saves space. However, it is very common on patch boards, mixers, etc.

The balanced 1/4" plug is identical to a stereo plug, but it carries a balanced mono signal.
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Old February 9th, 2008, 12:28 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Mark Harmer View Post
They sound like great choices, Danny.

You might wish to check a couple of things:

The Zoom H4 has apparently had problems with low-level interference noises when running on batteries - you might want to Google for this problem. I also gather it's more limited in terms of how much it can record on cards - again you may need to check this as it's a much earlier model than the H2.

By the way the MicroTrack II apparently has the proper level of phantom power and can run any studio mics - so they've improved this aspect since making the MicroTrack I. You do have to have an adaptor but I don't know if the 1/4" to XLR adaptor you can get for the Microtrack is a special one or just one you can make up yourself from bits (to provide the phantom power).

Whichever you go for, it's great to have something with no moving parts!!
You are exactly right, and the more I research, and I am known to do this way too much it looks like these three are the ones rated highest best listed first. (sub $500.00)

Sony PCM-D50
M-Audio MicroTrack II
Marantz PMD620

Can compare specs here http://www.wingfieldaudio.com/compar...recorders.html

Leading torwards the Sony model, cant find any negatives about it, if anyone else does, please let me know, I am too new to Pro Audio/Video to know.
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Old February 10th, 2008, 02:30 PM   #15
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I have the Sony PCM d50 and like it a lot. I will be using it for field stereo (nature sounds), some music recording, and voice over work. The built in mics are very good, and the preamps are strong so the mic sensitivity is high and noise is low.

I strongly suggest getting the deadcat or muff that goes with it. It cuts down on popping (voice overs) and greatly reduces wind noise. Without it you will get wind noise even carrying it across a room.

It's very easy to use as well.

Pat
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