Battery life for AT822 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 12th, 2008, 10:59 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
Posts: 660
Battery life for AT822

Greetings.

I've got a AT 822 stereo mic that has a AA battery.

1. How long do the batterys last?

2. How do you know when the battery is low or dead.

I've just been replacing the AA every now and then, but since there is no battery level indicator.....

Thanks.

Jonathan
Jonathan Levin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2008, 11:20 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 2,835
According to the AT website their spec for this mic claims 1000 hours battery life. Mind you, I suspect if it's something important you'll put a new one in anyway!
__________________
Andy K Wilkinson - http://www.shootingimage.co.uk
Cambridge (UK) Corporate Video Production
Andy Wilkinson is online now   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2008, 11:23 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Rio de Janeiro, BR
Posts: 170
I can't tell you about the AT822.

But I have the AT897 and just went to AT website to check this out.

In the mic brochure it say 1,200 hours, which I found to be fairly high.

I read somewhere else (can't remember) that the battery duration is 150 hours.

Well, since AA batteries are cheap I decided to exchange them everytime I used it for a very long time, or on the beginning of an important shoot.

I don't plan on using AA batteries anymore. I bought a 2Ch Juicedlink box that gives phantom power. It has great preamps, will run my AT897 on phantom, everything contributing for a better noise floor.

Hope this helps.
__________________
Pietro Impagliazzo
flickr.com/photos/impagliazzo
Pietro Impagliazzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2008, 11:30 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
Posts: 660
Hi Pietro,

Yes that does help and thank you for that reply. I think if my math is correct, if I divide the 1000 by six (assuming 6 hours of usage perday) the battery might last 166- 6 hour shoot days.

But like you said if it were something my carreer was riding on, I think new battery for everyone.

Jonathan
Jonathan Levin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2008, 10:23 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sydney.
Posts: 2,569
My AT822 is running to builders specs. I use those Arlec AAs in the 30 pack buys from Bunnings, great batteries. Don't use any rechargeable ones, short life and they die damn quick.

Also a good item to carry in the kit is a little battery checker, the one that will check AA, AAA, 9V and buttons. Cheap at Radio Shack, Tandy and Dick Smith, pays for itself in no time.

Just be careful when you screw the 822 body back on after replacing the battery, it is possible to cross thread it. Go carefully, I remember when ATs were so badly built no one would buy them.
Cheers.

Last edited by Allan Black; May 12th, 2008 at 10:29 PM. Reason: memories.
Allan Black is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2008, 10:42 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Black View Post
My AT822 is running to builders specs. I use those Arlec AAs in the 30 pack buys from Bunnings, great batteries. Don't use any rechargeable ones, short life and they die damn quick.

Also a good item to carry in the kit is a little battery checker, the one that will check AA, AAA, 9V and buttons. Cheap at Radio Shack, Tandy and Dick Smith, pays for itself in no time.

Just be careful when you screw the 822 body back on after replacing the battery, it is possible to cross thread it. Go carefully, I remember when ATs were so badly built no one would buy them.
Cheers.
Hey Allan, thanks for the advice on getting a battery checker. I'll pick one up for using with my recently purchased AT-822 (which you've helped me out a lot with over on this thread: http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/canon-xh-...eo-mic-a1.html ).

Could you explain wwhat you mean by "cross thread it"? You have me worried now about opening and closing my AT-822. I didn't know there was anything to watch out for.
__________________
Current Audio Equipment: two AT822 mics, Sony MZ-RH1, and KE-110CCR. What else should I get for short films and recording stand-up comedy? http://is.gd/kePy
Shahryar Rizvi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2008, 05:07 AM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shahryar Rizvi View Post
Hey Allan, thanks for the advice on getting a battery checker. I'll pick one up for using with my recently purchased AT-822 (which you've helped me out a lot with over on this thread: http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/canon-xh-...eo-mic-a1.html ).

Could you explain wwhat you mean by "cross thread it"? You have me worried now about opening and closing my AT-822. I didn't know there was anything to watch out for.

Cross threading is when the threads on the two parts aren't perfectly aligned to each other and when you try to screw them together they end up crooked and jammed. Most mic bodies are made from brass which is a comparatively soft metal and it's easy to damage the threads if they're not aligned and you try to force them. Schoeps capsules have a very fine thread and they suggest that when installing them, hold the two pieces together and turn slowly and gently counter-clockwise until you feel a slight 'click' as the starts of the threads on each piece ride over each other, then reverse and gently turn clockwise to engage the threads and screw on down. Same technique should work with your battery compartment.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2008, 11:02 PM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sydney.
Posts: 2,569
Good advice Steve. Crossing brass screw threads usually happens when you're in a hurry. By the time you realise you're doing it and/or you've locked the parts together it's too late. At that point stop! don't try to unscrew 'em till you're settled.

Brass has a low heating point so wrapping a heated cloth around a mic barrel will expand the outer casing to help unscrew it off the body, then take it to a good machinist to get a quote. If there's minor damage the threads could be re-machined. Maybe not worth it but with a sorrowful look or your girlfriends help, you never know :)

Soon as you get any gear with fine threads, make a mental note to be very careful and go sloooowww.

Many years ago AT mics were badly made causing many folk to avoid them. The brass composition used was very soft and scratching, denting and damaged threads were rife, this has since been rectified. Brass can change its composition with time becoming very brittle and fine parts just snap.

Cheers.
Allan Black is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:40 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network