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Old September 16th, 2008, 08:07 AM   #16
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Momentarily abandoning the original thread (info on an obsolete mic) and developing that of what could be achieved in the future, surely the key must lie in fast, powerful digital processing, as Ty says. To get usable sound, for instance, in a noisy environment without resorting to mics a few inches from the speakers' mouths would be no bad thing. If for a moment we accept that in the future that happens to an extent, maybe that processing power would be as effective if used in post rather than having extra gear on location? I can't see it happening - but what do I know? What do any of us know? Could what is now regarded as guide track be enhanced to be acceptable?
Or, and this has just occurred to me, perhaps less processing power would be needed to make the correctly placed mic, boom and boom op disappear from shot, as we can already do with a locked off mic in green screen! Oh dear...we pursue this line of reasoning to find that no skill whatsoever will be required in the recording of sound in video, if we can always place the mic in the ideal spot, regardless of how it looks. I'm doing us all out of a job.
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Old September 16th, 2008, 08:49 AM   #17
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Nick,

You Limey BASTARD!! (only kidding. :)

There will always be a "good enough" level for some people. Each person has his or her own level of that. I get business primarily from word of mouth and from return business because of where I set my level and where I set my price.

I get lots of requests to work on local indie films, but they can't afford me and, I'm sorry, I can't make a living for $100 for a 12 hour day.

Technology (invented by humans) can replace humans. It happens all the time. I'm not saying it couldn't happen with mics, but the odds are pretty high, this week.

Regards,

Ty Ford
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Old September 16th, 2008, 10:23 AM   #18
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Getting work

Ty, I am so interested in the way you get work, because it mirrors my efforts. I have found that personal recommendations and returns are the only way it works for me. When I was made redundant (laid off) from my staff job I went down the route of the desperate and made tons of cold calls, sent off letters by the dozen. Nothing! I find self-promotion very very difficult and am glad that events have persuaded me that it is fruitless. Perhaps we should start a new thread on methods of finding jobs!
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Old September 16th, 2008, 10:27 AM   #19
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"I get lots of requests to work on local indie films, but they can't afford me and, I'm sorry, I can't make a living for $100 for a 12 hour day".

So...any chance you could post these work requests for other fellow sound mixers...like the ones just entering the business, and hungry for work?

:)
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Old September 16th, 2008, 12:25 PM   #20
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Hi Chris,

Without prejudice or acrimony, I can say that no one gave me that deal when I was coming along. In order to make it, you need to be as good in business as you are in your craft.

Besides you don't really want $100/12. The kind of person who will pay you that is, not without exception, not the person you want to work for in the first place.

In addition, if you take their crumbs, you are doing your mates harm by low-balling the market and in the long run, hurting yourself. Please trust me on this.

I have friends who are shooters working on indies. They know they can't afford me on most of their projects, but we're still friends. They usually start any work related conversation with, "I know I can't afford you , but...." I help them when I can by answering questions.

Regards,

Ty Ford
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Old September 16th, 2008, 01:26 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Flowers View Post
Ty, I am so interested in the way you get work, because it mirrors my efforts. I have found that personal recommendations and returns are the only way it works for me. When I was made redundant (laid off) from my staff job I went down the route of the desperate and made tons of cold calls, sent off letters by the dozen. Nothing! I find self-promotion very very difficult and am glad that events have persuaded me that it is fruitless. Perhaps we should start a new thread on methods of finding jobs!
Nick,

I've done the same as you and I agree, self-promotion is hard work; some of the hardest work I do. I don't think it's fruitless, just low return. It does need to be done.

My secondary slogan is, "Ubiquity is its own reward." By that, I mean that getting your stuff out there on a regular, continuous basis is important. At some point, reputation begins to help some. I'm at that point now, but even I still need to crank the machine. I have a friend who travels a bit for his work. He comes back from Nashville, LA or wherever and says, "I was in LA and the studio guys know about you. Last month I was in Nashville and those guys know you too. How do you do that?"

I reminded him that I've been writing articles since 1986. Magazines pay me to write them. It's one of my many part time jobs. :) I also try to help people on forums and newsgroups. So I become a "familiar face" on the internet. I'm listed with a handful of crewing sites and have really solid connections with the people who run them. They are VERY comfortable about calling me in for jobs. (Making them comfortable is also one of my part time jobs.) I ask a lot of questions up front about each job and if I don't think I can nail it, I say "no thanks, not my gig." That hasn't happened very often, but there have been a few I've passed on.

Maybe reading a book or two on viral marketing will help you.

I think people hire people who they know or know something about. That seems to work for me. Return business is the key to success. When I'm working with someone for the first time, I'm also trying to figure out how I can work with them again.

Who can I meet? What can I do to get out in front of people I want to work with? What do they need? (no so much what can I do). The essence of good sales is solving the other person's problems. Listening is more important than talking.

How's that?

Regards,

Ty Ford
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Old September 17th, 2008, 12:39 AM   #22
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Good advice, Ty.
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