Sony MDR-V600 Headphone Review at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 2nd, 2003, 03:40 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 188
Sony MDR-V600 Headphone Review

I've recently purchased an AT-835b and a beachtek box to go with my GL1, and was wondering what would be the most appropriate set of "cans" to monitor my audio with. I wanted to get the best price/performance ratio I could find for the prosumer level. I've been perusing around the forums and researching here and there until I finally settled on the Sony MDR-V600 headphones. (I think they're comparable to the 7506 headphones, maybe a newer model?)

First and foremost let me say that I'm no audio expert. What I do know is what sounds good with my video. First thing out of the box I rigged my shotgun mic up and listened with the new 'phones. One word: amazing. I was missing so much of the audio with my $20 Koss headphones. These headphones allow me to finally get the most out of my mic $200+ mic.

For testing I aimed the mic at my friend's dog: you could hear the dog's smacking lips and drool filled breaths. Simply amazing, even the throaty, slight growls of the dog were clearly audible. Dialogue is equally crystal clear. Some may argue that the Audio Technica mic is what makes the clearness here, (which is absolutely true) but I've been working with it long enough to know that I wouldn't have heard the same quality had I not been using the MDR-V600's. The headphones are extremely comfortable. The only downside is that the circumaural cups that cover your ears make it a little warm in there, but other than that there's nothing that wouldn't suit them for comfortable use for extended periods of time. The overall sound is clear, not too bassy, and the cups do a good job of killing most ambient noise. And to boot, the whole thing folds up for easy schlepping into your gear bag. Big space saver.

I've never really focused on audio much, but am starting to pay more and more attention to this important part of production. I'm confident that the Sony's will do a good job of allowing me to monitor and work with audio throughout the production process (esp. post) without a hitch. As I type I'm listening to music now, and I must say it'll be hard to switch back to my altec speakers after this! Aside from video work they sound great on my computer and with video games (Medal of Honor is simply amazing).

Now here comes the kicker: $100 at Best Buy (didn't want to eBay and get used ones....used headphones creep me out). My friend Spencer and I debated whether or not the sound would be that much better than a $30 pair of circumaural phones, and I decided to take a chance. In the end I'd have to say it's worth every cent. I hear things I never did, and I'm sure that my ability to work with audio on this level will allow my viewers, regardless of their video/audio setup, to get the most out of my productions. I hope this may help anyone out who's in search of a good means to monitor audio!
__________________
http://devin.par-t-com.net
Devin Doyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2003, 04:01 PM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,222
Everyone will have their opinions about headphones and speakers. Here's mine.

While I haven't tried the MDRV600s, I used to use an MDRV6 about ten years ago. I purchased them ten years ago on good reviews, but I eventually abandoned them because they seemed better for auditioning than recording. The MDRV6s appear to be very similar, identical in appearance. My impression was that the MDRV6 headphones boosted the lows and highs too much. While this "improves" the listening experience, your recordings will sound much less if you guide your recording EQ with the headphones. Both are listed with deep bass response, so watch out. The MDRV6 still sells for about $20 more.

Also, the MDRV6 really clamp down on my wide head and
crush my ears a bit. I think that this clamping action is actually the secret to their bass response by conducting the bass through your skull.

Personally, I prefer the mid to upper Sennheisers. The low end Sennheisers sound muddy. Sennheiser HD570 is an economical mid-range unit that I recommend to anyone. They are totally comfortable and have a crisp mid-range, perfect for catching to artifacts. Their downside is that the components jiggle loose every few months, but I suppose this is a better response than tearing the cord. I catch my headphones on chairs and stuff a lot.
To repair the Sennhsiers, pop the ear hood of the silent piece and reinsert the wire. Easy.
Gints Klimanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2003, 06:27 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 188
Thanks for your input Gints. I sense that you're more of an audiophile than I am, but as you mentioned, everyone has their own opinions about audio equipment.

While the MDRV6 and the MDR-V600 look alike, I can't help but notice they have updated and revised the design. The "cans" on the newer models are a bit larger than from what I see in a pic of the MDRV6, and they fit me like a charm. (i think I've got an average sized head) But they may crunch someone with a bigger head, that I don't know. However you may be right on the count of the of the boosted highs and lows (esp since both models are listed with deep bass response). I don't think I have such a discerning ear that I could tell the difference anyways. They sound fine to me! My work isn't so precision that it would make that huge of a difference, but prosumer enough to watch out for it.

Thanks for the tip about the deep bass response, I'll be sure to watch for that in my work. I think it's good to have varied opinions for the benefit of the community. Thanks again Gints!
__________________
http://devin.par-t-com.net
Devin Doyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2003, 07:01 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,222
Doyle,

I didn't mean to be too harsh on the MDR-V600, because I only have experience with the MDR-V6s. The bass boost
via head-clamping is quite clever, but that may not have been an element of the Sony design. Many of my musician friends have enjoyed the MDRV6s for ten or so years, so it's clearly a successful design.
Gints Klimanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2003, 07:30 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 188
Gints, you weren't too harsh at all! It's good to have your 2 cents on this post so others can be well informed when making a similar purchase. Thanks again!
__________________
http://devin.par-t-com.net
Devin Doyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2003, 08:25 PM   #6
Wrangler
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Vallejo, California
Posts: 4,049
Adjusting equalization in the field would seem to me to be a bad idea in general and that the sound should be recorded as flat as possible (talking video sound, not music sound here) for later work if necessary.

What I want out of a set of phones on location is the detection of problem sounds and insurance that I'm getting the sound I want.

I use a set of Sony noise cancelling microphones in the field. They kill about 70% of the external noise but do allow me to hear the cement truck that is sneaking up on me as I shoot by myself a great deal of the time.

When I shoot with an on-the-shoulder camera, I have to use earbuds because normal cans hit the camera. I noticed that a lot of the news cameramen use earbuds too.
__________________
Mike Rehmus
Hey, I can see the carrot at the end of the tunnel!
Mike Rehmus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2003, 08:53 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 188
Indeed, thats mostly what I use my headphones for in production. Troubleshoot a noise then workaround/avoid it. I dont have the means to change EQ in field (running through a Beachtek), so I can't screw that up too badly.
__________________
http://devin.par-t-com.net
Devin Doyle is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:17 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network