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Old January 1st, 2009, 09:51 AM   #16
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I had anticipated getting the Sennheiser MKH-50 to record interior speaking vocals (typical "living room" setting). At this point, I'm needing to save some money. I'd like some suggestions on lesser expensive mics for recording interiors.
The MKH 50 is a pure super-cardioid mic.

So the best and nearest equivalent is the new MKH 8050 - about £400 cheaper in the UK and just as good.
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Old January 1st, 2009, 10:20 AM   #17
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John,

my experiences with the 8050 was that it had a big low end, resulting picking up a lot of LF and requiring a Rycote lyre suspension mount to prevent boom handling noise.

What have you found?

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Old January 1st, 2009, 10:29 AM   #18
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my experiences with the 8050 was that it had a big low end, resulting picking up a lot of LF and requiring a Rycote lyre suspension mount to prevent boom handling noise.

What have you found?
True, the MKH 8050 extends about 10Hz lower than the MKH 50, down to about 30Hz turnover.

There will be a module in the new year that screws between the mic. head and XLR module to give a bass ro;;-off and 10dB pad - both switchable.
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Old January 1st, 2009, 04:13 PM   #19
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John,

Good to hear about the add-on, I don't hink the folks had any idea the mic would end up on a boom. My evaluations here with showed the low end to be problematic.

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Old January 2nd, 2009, 04:01 PM   #20
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[QUOTE=Tyler Franco;986477]I had anticipated getting the Sennheiser MKH-50 to record interior speaking vocals (typical "living room" setting). What do you guys think about the Rode NTG-2? Is it a correct mic for interiors? QUOTE]

NTG2 for interiors? NO, by my experience, just tried it on an interview in a typical living room and it clearly sounds "hollow". You'll waste your shot.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 04:42 PM   #21
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This thread has become very informative. Thanks to all who are posting! So if Hypers are better for interiors, I was thinking of the Rode NT3 perhaps. Anyone have experience with this mic? I've listened to some comparisons online it sounds very good and would save a large amount of money.

Oh and Greg, something goofy did happen. I hit submit and it erred out and then I hit the back button and hit submit again. Then I reloaded the forum and saw the double posts.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 04:49 PM   #22
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Tyler,

If you hate your boom op. get an NT3. Please check its weight.

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Old January 3rd, 2009, 11:43 AM   #23
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I think the NT3 would be a good choice for internal shooting on more limited budgets, like mine. I think a lot can be done with lower rung mics like the NT3. A lot of great sound is independent of the mic used and has to do with getting the room acoustically set up, getting the mic in just the right position, and knowing what to do in post production.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 02:41 PM   #24
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I think the NT3 would be a good choice for internal shooting on more limited budgets, like mine. I think a lot can be done with lower rung mics like the NT3. A lot of great sound is independent of the mic used and has to do with getting the room acoustically set up, getting the mic in just the right position, and knowing what to do in post production.
The point is that while it a decent mic, the NT3 is a real heavyweight, far too big and heavy to be slung out on the end of a hand-operated boom. When it can be mounted on a mic stand it's not bad sounding, but there are other hypercardioids in a similar price range that are quite a bit more appropriate to boom mic use.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 03:38 PM   #25
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The point is that while it a decent mic, the NT3 is a real heavyweight, far too big and heavy to be slung out on the end of a hand-operated boom. When it can be mounted on a mic stand it's not bad sounding, but there are other hypercardioids in a similar price range that are quite a bit more appropriate to boom mic use.
Could you give some examples please? Thanks!
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 05:08 PM   #26
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You know these online demos are helpful, but shouldn't be a sole deciding factor. They can give you a basic idea of how a mic sounds, but you really need to spend a few days with a mic to really get to know it. Off axis sound is what can really sepeate on mic from another, as does how much proximity effect a mic has. In post, a good mic with low proximity effect means different takes of the same scene will cut with little to no eq to match. I just cut some stuff recorded with a 416 and it was a real PITA to match. OTH stuff I record with my cmc64 cut without effort outside of basic level adjustments. Even when a bit off axis, it still works, and that's why it's worth the price.
For sit down work, a cheaper mic may indeed work very well because it's easy to be consistent with it. With hand booming for reality / docs a more forgiving mic will save time and money in post by needing less work to mix
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 05:47 PM   #27
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Could you give some examples please? Thanks!
Audix SCX1/HC, AKG Blueline SE300b/CK93, Oktava M012
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Old January 4th, 2009, 06:36 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Steve Oakley View Post
You know these online demos are helpful, but shouldn't be a sole deciding factor. They can give you a basic idea of how a mic sounds, but you really need to spend a few days with a mic to really get to know it. Off axis sound is what can really sepeate on mic from another, as does how much proximity effect a mic has. In post, a good mic with low proximity effect means different takes of the same scene will cut with little to no eq to match. I just cut some stuff recorded with a 416 and it was a real PITA to match. OTH stuff I record with my cmc64 cut without effort outside of basic level adjustments. Even when a bit off axis, it still works, and that's why it's worth the price.
For sit down work, a cheaper mic may indeed work very well because it's easy to be consistent with it. With hand booming for reality / docs a more forgiving mic will save time and money in post by needing less work to mix
Well said Steve,

CAN SOMEONE MAKE A STICLY OUT OF THIS!!

REgards,

Ty Ford
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Old January 9th, 2009, 10:22 AM   #29
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AKG Blueline SE300B/CK93 modular combo
I own this combo. Work with a lot of different soundies. They are all impressed with this setup. Easy/quick switchout to the short gun when needed.
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