Matching narration from different mic sources at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 7th, 2009, 02:45 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 496
Matching narration from different mic sources

Ok, so between using a Sennheiser wireless lav mic and a USB plugin desktop mic for narration, what are some of your favorite desktop methods for trying to make the audio recordings sound not too different?
__________________
Dave -
Dave Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2009, 04:03 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
The generic answer would be to use your ears and a proper set of monitor speakers to tweak the equalization on the two tracks until they sound similar. But what's your actual situation here - what's on the various tracks you're working with and how are you cutting them together? It may be that you don't really need to match them. There can be a difference between narration and VO in that they come from two different psychological spaces as far as the audience is concerned. Given those different spaces, one would expect VO tracks recorded on location to have quite diffferent ambiences from tracks that are truly narration so perhaps matching them isn't important or even desirable. True narration is closeup and personal, sounding like someone is sitting next to you in the audience explaining things on the screen to you. It's removed from the scene, outside of the picture space on the screen and would have a very different sound from dialog recorded on location. VO dialog, OTOH, sounds quite different, even if the location recording ends up with the speaker off camera heard over cutaways. Similarly, an off-camera interviewer asking questions is not narration, even if you record them later in studio to replace the audio shot on location, because he is in the scene unfolding on the screen, he's part of the picture even though the audience doesn't see him. If that's what you have, be sure to record a healthy amount of room tone / ambience at the location and use the same mic in the studio to record his speech that you used to record the on-camera portion on location. Mix the recorded ambience with the studio recorded questions and you're there. Just something to think about that might simplify your post production chores.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2009, 03:06 AM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 496
Good info, thanks.
__________________
Dave -
Dave Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2009, 09:59 AM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
Adding to Steve's most excellent response. If the same person is doing both the on-camera work and the narration and the context of the piece indicates this, I try to use the same mic. If he/she is on a lav for the on camera. I'll have him/her do the VO with the same rig and in the same space so there won't be a break in aural continuity.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:04 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network