Indoor recording...need to sound like outdoors at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 27th, 2009, 09:28 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Warwick, Rhode Island
Posts: 740
Indoor recording...need to sound like outdoors

I recorded one line of ADR in someone living room, and for me I can tell the difference in the reverb between it and the outdoor footage it is being spliced into. How could I make it sound more like an outdoor recording in an open area? The indoor sound isn`t super echoey or anything, but still noticeable to have an indoor sound. I have Adobe Audition3 to work with. Your help would be great. I can supply samples if need be.
__________________
Cinematography Site
Nathan Quattrini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2009, 09:42 PM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 1,267
Nathan,
Have you mixed in some outdoor ambience with the track? This is when you hope the soundman got to record room tone for the scene. Usually you also want to make the micing technique similar to what you are replacing so there is less of a difference in overall sound quality. HTH
Daniel Epstein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Warwick, Rhode Island
Posts: 740
yea there is ambient sound with it as well, but its the reverb difference in the voice that is noticeable. I may be overacting as an editor, not sure, but sound isn`t my strong point. I am playing around to hope to stumble on a way to make it sound better, but someone knowledged in how it works would be a huge help. Its a 3 word line that is holding up completion of the film hahah
__________________
Cinematography Site
Nathan Quattrini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 12:30 AM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 99
It strikes me you had a room with a bit of echo or reverb. Did you have the walls covered with curtains or some other sort of sound dampening devices?

Once echo is in the recording you cannot get it out.

Without having a proper sound recording studio, there is one trick that I have used. Get the person being recorded to stand in a wardrobe, among the clothes hanging.

Better still, take the talent outside, preferably to where the original sound was recorded.

When you have a clean recording you can add effects to match the main audio.
Colin Pearce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 05:40 AM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 74
I suppose it is out of the question to record the lines outside ?
Cheers
Jon
Jon Goodman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 11:36 AM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
"I suppose it is out of the question to record the lines outside ?"

That's exactly what I was thinking. Can you duplicate the circumstances outside? It is, after all, just a single line. If possible, you will want the same location, mic, time of day and even time of year. You'll never get it match doing it indoors, at least I couldn't. The only only other possibility I see is making the recording in as dead of a space as possible and then trying to EQ into line with the other footage. That's the sort of thing the pros get big money for.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 04:05 PM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 2,053
I don't recall where I read this (Studio Daily?) but a director would have actors ADR their lines in the same -- or similar -- environment in which they were performed. For example, put the talent in a car if the scene were in a car.

With the availability of smaller LCD monitors, etc., that becomes very possible.

The other option is to hang lots of moving blankets. The cheap ones you can get from Costco or UHaul. They'll help dampen the room and reduce or eliminate the unwanted reverb.
__________________
Dean Sensui
Exec Producer, Hawaii Goes Fishing
Dean Sensui is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 12:03 PM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan Quattrini View Post
I recorded one line of ADR in someone living room, and for me I can tell the difference in the reverb between it and the outdoor footage it is being spliced into. How could I make it sound more like an outdoor recording in an open area? The indoor sound isn`t super echoey or anything, but still noticeable to have an indoor sound. I have Adobe Audition3 to work with. Your help would be great. I can supply samples if need be.
Hello Nathan,

Be brave. Open the door, step outside, hit record.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2009, 11:49 PM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Warwick, Rhode Island
Posts: 740
took me almost 3 months to get the line. And outside where we were was too noisy to do it. I`ll just have to bite the bullet and pretty much leave as is. Likely I`ll be the only one to notice that bad, and other film makers.
__________________
Cinematography Site
Nathan Quattrini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2009, 11:36 PM   #10
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Sensui View Post
I don't recall where I read this (Studio Daily?) but a director would have actors ADR their lines in the same -- or similar -- environment in which they were performed. For example, put the talent in a car if the scene were in a car.
Actually, even if the scene wasn't in a car, put the talent in a car. They make really excellent voiceover booths in a pinch.
Noah Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 12:21 AM   #11
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
If you want a recording that sounds like the inside of a car.

There's a lot of parallel glass in a car.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 02:13 AM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
It's not too hard to get an outdoor shot to sound like it's indoors. (There are no echos - assuming you're not near any buildings - so you can simply add the desired room echo.) Taking room echo away to make it sound like it's outdoors is another story.

Don't underestimate your audience. They won't know why the line sounds wrong, but they will know that it does.

I'm with Ty. Try recording it outside. Drive to a quiet location, if needed. Who knows? Maybe you'll nail it on the first take. If not, what's the cost? An hour or two?
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 02:19 AM   #13
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty Ford View Post
There's a lot of parallel glass in a car.
So true. Isolation is only half of the story.

If it's the best you have, cover the windows with shipping foam, blankets or something. Same with the seats, if they're leather or vinyl.

Another trick is to buy a little acoustic foam and mount it in an open cardboard box. Put the mic at the edge of the box. You just killed all the reflections from behind the mic. Of course, that alone doesn't solve the isolation problem...
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 12:09 PM   #14
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty Ford View Post
If you want a recording that sounds like the inside of a car.

There's a lot of parallel glass in a car.
True, but it's better than an average untreated living room. I have a little "porta-booth" made from a box lined with acoustic foam as the post above describes. Set that up in the back seat of a car or van, and you can get decent results. The major downside is that the talent has to be sitting down, which isn't ideal for a lot of reasons.
Noah Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2009, 01:44 AM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Pearce View Post
Get the person being recorded to stand in a wardrobe, among the hanging clothes.
It works well for me. No echoes, either. Quick, easy, effective.
Colin Pearce is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:57 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network