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Old March 16th, 2009, 12:18 PM   #1
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Lectrosonics 100 Series or Sennheiser G2?

I have used the Sennheiser EV100 for years and I need to purchase a new lav system after my equipment finally broke after a couple trips to Africa. I have used the Sennheiser G2 lav system as well and I like the results- a much better system than the EV100.

My question is this: Is the Lectrosonics worth spending an additional $600us for this unit versus the low price of the Sennheiser? Also, does anyone recommend a Sony or other lav system for the $500- to $700us price range? I will be usig this system with a Sony EX3.

Thanks.
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Old March 16th, 2009, 01:06 PM   #2
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Larry:

A good question, and the answer depends on your needs.

I have a Lectro LMa & UCR100 and a Sennheiser G2 set. These are both good systems.

The Lectrosonics is a more professional system with a better build quality and the sound quality is a little better. The Lectrosonics stuff can handle abuse and sounds good transmitting from any kind of mike or remote source where you don't want it wired.

The G2 is still a pretty good setup, but with a little poorer sound and you wouldn't want to drop it in the dirt, as it could get dirt (or anything) inside the case when the door flops open, which it has. The G2 seems a little muffled to me, which in some cases, is actually good for rejecting unwanted HF and room sound. The G2 low end is non-existant, which is great for rejecting wind. For clean applications like a wedding dialoge, the G2 is good. For capturing sound inside something like a sports car or that bird chirping, poor.

If you do go with the Lectrosonic, get the UCR401 digital hybrid reciever, that thing is sweet. Pick the best transmitter for your use, probably the LMa. The only downside to Lectrosonics is all the choices available, that inevitably raises the cost even more.


IMO:
For weddings, clean shoots and dialogue; the G2

For major events, dirty use and recording sound besides peoples voices; a Lectrosonics system.

I would be interested in others opinions too.
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Old March 16th, 2009, 01:32 PM   #3
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It's worth noting that if you have paying clients, they'll want to see a high end brand name like Lectrosonics or Zaxcom on your equipment list.
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Old March 16th, 2009, 02:16 PM   #4
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Sennheiser G-2 vs Lectrosonics LM100

Take a look at the millwatt output... 30mw for the Sennheiser and 50mw for the Lectrosonics LM100.

I used Sennheiser G2 units and had the oportunity to upgrade to the more powerful Lectrosonics units.

The Lectrosonics unit I purchased was the older UM100 transmitter with 100mw output (the max per FCC regs) instead of the LMa 50mw transmitter (current unit).

*Note make sure you buy units with the Freq Blocks lower than 27 and that there is no TV or radio stations in your area using the same frequencys.

Lectrosonics | TV Station Lookup
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Old March 16th, 2009, 06:11 PM   #5
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I have some old Lecto 185s, a 211, 411 and G2s. I use what the client can and can't afford and the conditions. Using expensive systems on a cheap scumbag client rubs me the wrong way, especially if something happens to a transmitter and/or mic, .. or anything else, I would never get a dime out of them w/o attorney and court expenses. IF fact.. I no longer do reality with my own WLs systems. Sorry for the rant.

Last edited by Rick Reineke; March 16th, 2009 at 09:59 PM.
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Old March 17th, 2009, 07:03 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Kellam View Post
The G2 seems a little muffled to me, which in some cases, is actually good for rejecting unwanted HF and room sound. The G2 low end is non-existant, which is great for rejecting wind. For clean applications like a wedding dialoge, the G2 is good. For capturing sound inside something like a sports car or that bird chirping, poor.
This sounds more like a complaint against the supplied ME 2 / ME 4 tie mic. than the G2 as a whole.

Bass on the G2 goes down to 40Hz (much better than the old G1 systems).

Changing the tie mic. on a G2 will give a good improvement.
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Old March 17th, 2009, 08:35 AM   #7
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I will concur with John's statement, the supplied mics with the G2 are very poor. Upgrading to a better mic will substantially increase your satisfaction with this system. The comments by Jeff are funny to me, as my G2's have not only been inside NHRA dragsters for ESPN (ecm77/mke2/sm57/akg mic), but also working PGATour golf events as both ambient chirping bird mics (md42 mic) and following golf ball strikes in the fairways (MKH816 or ME67 mic--check out the Live@ broadcast on pgatour.com sometime). My broadcast clients continue to praise my sounds. Better mics make a *huge* difference.

I would not get to obsessed with power output ratings. MANY factors dictate how well or how far a wireless will work, i don't consider it wise to rely solely on power specs. I for one have pushed the G2 well past even Sennheiser's expectations. For what it's worth, *my* paying clients don't care at all which hardware I have in my arsenal. They care that I produce quality results that fall within their budgets and timeframes. Nothing else really matters to them. YMMV.

All of that being said, if you have the budget, the Lectro and Zaxcom are much better systems, but nothing beats the G2 in the "bang for the buck" department. If you are the bigger budget type, also include the Sennheiser professional series in your quest. The 3000 and 5000 series are stellar...happy shopping.
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Old March 17th, 2009, 09:38 AM   #8
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From what Greg and John know about the G2 system and aftermarket mics, the G2 would be a great option for a low cost system with another mic. Even with another mic, it's much less expensive than a nice Lectrosonics setup.

I havent used the G2 in quite awhile, I wonder if I have the LF rolloff turned way up? Or does the G2 even have a LF rolloff? Gotta re-read the manual before the next use.

Time for a new G2 microphone(s).
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Old March 17th, 2009, 10:11 AM   #9
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Sennheisers are good but the pros prefer Lectrosoincs

I agree the Sennheiser G2 units are a good buy for the money, but in a perfect world where all wireless audio is in "Line of Sight" then you can get away with a 30mw unit. But in reality there is the time when the talent steps around a corner or inside a metal building and you need a bit more power from your wireless units. If you go to Trew Audio and look at the Location Sound Mixer links you will find most all of the pros prefer Lectrosoincs.
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Old March 18th, 2009, 08:59 AM   #10
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Larry, I have and use both the G2 and the 400 Series. Comparing the two is like comparing anything at a 100% price difference. My $45,000 Lexus may be a fast car, but your $90,000 Porsche is going to eat its lunch on a racetrack.

Unfortunately, the car analogy forgets the driver. I saw an expert driver in a decrepit old Honda Accord hold his own against a track filled with Porsches piloted by less experienced drivers. I don't think the same apples to wireless mics - they either work in a given moment, or they don't. There's not a lot of difference an operator makes in the wireless system itself, though how it's placed, how it's secured, how it's mixed are all vitally important. (That felt like a disclaimer a bit...sorry.)

That said, if you're working for someone who isn't covering insurance (as a previous poster most elegantly noted), it hurts less when a G2 gets damaged.
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Old March 18th, 2009, 09:15 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Bellotte View Post
For what it's worth, *my* paying clients don't care at all which hardware I have in my arsenal.
I think the point Marco was raising was that, depending on whether you are PRODUCING a video or freelancing and supplying gear, clients may have different expectations of quality of gear, perceived or real.

If I hired a shooter for a TV series and specified Pro Audio gear and he showed up with a Samson VHF wireless, he'd be gone before he turned his camera gear on REGARDLESS of how good the audio may in fact sound. If the above mentioned shooter was producing a corporate video for my company and I didn't see gear and at the end of everything I liked what I heard, no foul.

Managing people's perceptions is a valid concern in any business. Each of us has to make the best choice we can based on our knowledge of our clients and the financial situation we are in relative to the purchase of gear.
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Old March 18th, 2009, 10:36 AM   #12
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I do think that the G2 is certainly good enough quality for commercial videography. I've done some television spots that air locally with my AT system (which is comparable) and they sound great. I think the mic makes the biggest difference, as people have noted in here. The producers I work with know and trust me, and don't question my kit, but I've probably lost some bids because I don't have Lectrosonic. I had an interview with a producer about a month ago who practically snorted when I mentioned I used the AT system. I've had others look at me funny when they found that I need double A batteries rather then 9 volt. They aren't used to hearing that and get suspicious.
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