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Old March 21st, 2009, 10:23 PM   #1
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Using a cheap mic stand for a boom

I've been using this for awhile:

On-Stage MS7201B Round Base Mic Stand from zZounds.com!

And other than being heavy, if you tape the cable on so it decouples and you put a decent shockmount on it, it's fine.

So what's all the fuss about expensive poles?
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 12:07 AM   #2
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Not sure what you are asking.... if you are telling us that a mic stand boom can serve as a static boom... yer right.... nothing new.

If you are saying "why not use a mic stand in place of a boom pole" well then... my friend, you never held or monitored a boom pole for any period of time.

Boom poles are lighter, longer, and more iolated noise wise.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 01:14 AM   #3
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When you're booming 10+ hours a day, every single ounce counts. Your average mic stand extends to 5', and weighs in right around 2lbs. Rode's 10' Aluminum boom is about 3oz lighter than that, and it's not a particularly light pole. K-Tek's 9'2" Aluminum pole, WITH the internal cable is something like 24oz, that's like a whole quarter pounder with cheese LESS to hold over your head all day long

Now, those are just your inexpensive, more entry level kind of poles. Going to carbon or graphite, a 5' pole is under 10oz. A 20' pole weighs the same as your 5' metal mic stand.

For any kind of work where you're framing your shots wider than an extreme close-up, you absolutely need a longer boom or the boom op will be in your shot. Longer poles also let you get your mic in position when you've got other crew members between you and the action.

That being said, if all you need is a 5' pole - you've never had to re-plan a shot to work around the tiny boom - then you're already all set and it's not really an issue for you.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 09:49 AM   #4
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I occasionally use a standard music type mic/boom stand for "sit down" interviews. However using it for a run & gun would be ridiculous.
My .02 cents
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 10:34 AM   #5
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I hope you take the base off at least. ;)
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 11:03 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffery Magat View Post
I hope you take the base off at least. ;)
Oh I do :P.

Well thank you for the replies. I've only had to boom pretty short distances and since I'm new it has never been too long (and it hasn't been me :P) ... so I guess I can see where I will be needing one in the future.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 02:16 PM   #7
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There is no substitution for a boom pole

Trust me... you need a real boom pole!

Inexpensive poles are available on Ebay or go to Guy's website.

I bought a Rode boom-pole a few years back from him and it was a excellent starter unit. Recently I moved up to a K-Tek graphite unit and it is a very smooth and light pole.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 03:13 PM   #8
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If nothing else, you can upgrade to a painter's pole.

Frankly, if you're doing occasional indie shoots, a boom pole should be the last investment - as long as your cheapo pole doesn't transmit noise. Unlike camera, lights, support systems, mic, preamp and recorder, the boom pole doesn't improve the final result.

It does, however, improve the comfort of the boom operator. Maybe you can convince him/her to invest in the equipment. ;)
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 04:41 PM   #9
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There is no substitution for a boom pole

Trust me... you need a real boom pole!

Inexpensive poles are available on Ebay or go to Guy's website.

I bought a Rode boom-pole a few years back from him and it was a excellent starter unit. Recently I moved up to a K-Tek graphite unit and it is a very smooth and light pole.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 07:14 PM   #10
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sorta related... I use boom poles but for some shots I use this On-Stage | SB9600 Studio Tripod Boom Stand | SB9600 | B&H Photo

It's super cheap and for static scenes it can save your sound ops arm.
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