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Old February 25th, 2004, 12:16 PM   #16
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Although I came to Western for philosophy as a prep for law, I was looking forward to taking some film classes. I am taking Intro Film Studies right now and it is theory mostly. We do however learn about cinematography, and I have learned a bunch about film making...rules for shooting and whatnot but it is a far cry from the hands on stuff you are talking about. Next year i'm taking a class on documentaries and maybe film asthetics but that is as close as Western gets.

I think reading up on your own will teach you a hell of a lot more than any university classroom. My film TA is a graduate in film studies yet knows NOTHING about DV. It's all theory, which I think is complete BULL. We had a whole class on hte "nightmare vagina" in Alien and sexual refrences throughout. Ugh. My advice is to stay away from theory as much as you can! Don't let it taint your virgin filmmaker mind!

Our university has a film festival every year and next year I really want to make a good submission. Maybe this is something Glenn would understand more than the rest of your older guys out there but the more gear you carry around, the more sophisticated you look, the more singled out and watched you feel. My buddy and I did a short in the library one day when we were bored and boy did we feel stupid! "It's for film class" we told them but I don't think most bought it...Now if I had a tripod in there, with a boom pole and junk oh boy i'd have been laughed out of there! How do you guys overcome this awkwardness?

So glenn what are you planning on doing with a degree from ryerson? anything specific?

Good luck...sorry for getting so OT!
Rob
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Old February 25th, 2004, 12:34 PM   #17
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"Maybe this is something Glenn would understand more than the rest of your older guys out there but the more gear you carry around, the more sophisticated you look, the more singled out and watched you feel."

Rob
I really want you to think about that statement.

A young guy knows more than an older guy even though the old fart lived throught that experience and countless others? Give yourself a (playful) slap on the noggin.

The older you get the smarter people older than you become. When i was 16 my dad was the Village Idiot, by the time I hit 30, he really improved himself, to the point of absolute, bloody brilliance.

To answer your question. Proffesional gear usually impresses people at all levels. Somepeople are immature in that they react with jealousy and ridicule others.

Sure you feel on the spot. Pro gear has a high expectation attached to it. If you have not so nice gear , you have an excuse for not doing so well.

When I show up with my Marzpak on and the 4x4 matte box mounted, I feel like a 3 eyed nerd. I usually forget about that as soon as I start working. Good gear says that YOU MEAN BUSINESS!!!!!!!!!
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Old February 25th, 2004, 02:20 PM   #18
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Adding to what beas said...when I show up on a shoot and someone is paying me to make their idea come to life, I am pretty emberassed if I don't have the tools I need to make that happen. Our clients understand they aren't paying for Digibeta, but they do expect me to have mics, a tripod, a monitor, probably a vectorscope, a chip chart, a cart load of stands and c-clamps. It's not embarrassing to show up with all that stuff, it's pride in my client's product. It seems you would have the same pride in your own concepts, and if the gear is available to you use it.

You will always be watched, people are fascinated by what we do. If you look like you know what you're doing, they will watch longer.
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Old February 25th, 2004, 03:51 PM   #19
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You guys totally missed what I meant.
When I appealed to Glenn and his age, I was speaking of the overly critical teenage eyes, the peer pressure, etc.

Quote:
A young guy knows more than an older guy even though the old fart lived throught that experience and countless others? Give yourself a (playful) slap on the noggin.
Have you forgotten your highschool years? Can you not remember the superficial jocks, preppies, geeks, cheerleaders, car buffs and so on?

The older people get, the less judgemental they become and the less they feel the need to single people out for being different. I will probably be slapped with a your too young to be speaking of this, but in two days I will be twenty and I am very in touch with my age group's thinking.

I was called the "cool nerd" because I still liked the things "cool people" liked, but I had my computer stuff there too...like a big secret. I remember getting in a fight once with a guy in gym class and was told "why don't you go home and play half-life" (a popular computer game). I know exactly what people my age and under think of the technically educated and it isn't as nice and pretty as you guys would like to believe. Being knowledgable about computers is something that definately threatened my reputation and stance among my peers in highschool. I was able to overcome this and my smarts were accepted and appreciated but ONLY after people saw that I was a "normal" person FIRST and a "geek" second.

Being at university isn't as equalizing as you all may think. I KNOW for a fact that if I voluteered for TV Western (this isn't the reason I don't...I have no time for it), it would say something about me as a person and my values. Probably a computer nerd, probably no friends, probably stays in on weekends to do extra homework...yada yada. All not true, but that IS the common way of thinking.

Rob
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Old February 25th, 2004, 04:19 PM   #20
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Glenn, I can't recall which Sony mic I had. It was long ago. I also had another non-Sony mic, which broke as well. I have actually just purchased another mic, an Apex 191. However, I have not tried it yet because I have no way of hooking it up. It was $99.98 Canadian + 14.5% GST/PST.
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Old February 25th, 2004, 04:36 PM   #21
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Hey...I play counter-strike. But I guess I get what your saying. Or realize that I can't get what your saying; hmmmm.
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Old February 25th, 2004, 04:43 PM   #22
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Quote:
We had a whole class on hte "nightmare vagina" in Alien and sexual refrences throughout. Ugh. My advice is to stay away from theory as much as you can! Don't let it taint your virgin filmmaker mind!
That sounds like some sort of psychoanalysis- which in my opinion is usually bull. The claims made aren't very useful if you can't prove via some test that it's more likely than the opposite (in this case, that there is no "nightmare vagina" in Alien).

But I think film theory classes can be of some value, as long as it doesn't involve bull like that. Example:
Quote:
Around 1919, Kuleshov began a series of editing experiments which led to a startling discovery (in what has become known as the "Mozhukhin Experiment"). In separate sequences, shots of various objects (a bowl of soup, a smiling child, and a dead body), were juxtaposed against identical archive clips of a famous actor (Ivan Mozhukhin). The audience read a different meaning into Mozhukhin's expression with each combination. This discovery demonstrated the power of editing to alter the perception of the subject, in this case, the actor's emotions and thoughts. The experiment also, implicitly, advanced the verisimilar acting style as the ideal for film; purportedly, Mozhukin was praised by the audience for his subtle acting abilities.
Things like that have a certain level of truth (you can test it with the scientific method) and has real world applications (you can control the meaning of the film by manipulating the choice and order of the clips you use).

Quote:
Our university has a film festival every year and next year I really want to make a good submission. Maybe this is something Glenn would understand more than the rest of your older guys out there but the more gear you carry around, the more sophisticated you look, the more singled out and watched you feel. My buddy and I did a short in the library one day when we were bored and boy did we feel stupid! "It's for film class" we told them but I don't think most bought it...Now if I had a tripod in there, with a boom pole and junk oh boy i'd have been laughed out of there! How do you guys overcome this awkwardness?
Just do it? If you don't look guilty and look like you know what you're doing, you should be able to "get away" with filming in a library. Act like filming in a library is a legitimate activity, or else you'll look like a bunch of hooligans messing around with a camera.

If you needed to do real shooting in a library (with lighting and everything), then it's *not* a good idea to just do it. You need permission and insurance (in case your lighting makes the books catch on fire or whatever).

How do you avoid awkwardness? IMO awkwardness exists only in your head. Just go out and shoot stuff. Look like you know what you're doing (so other people are less likely to question you, which will make you even feel more awkward). However, know the rules, think about negative consequences if you shoot something, and don't do anything wrong. You may need shooting permits, prisons will not tolerate you filming their building, and some people may get angry if you point a camera at them. If you look like you know what you're doing you can get away with illegal things, but that doesn't mean you should do it.

Quote:
So glenn what are you planning on doing with a degree from ryerson? anything specific?
I think I'm going to get into video editing afterwards. I don't think the letter after my name helps me out much in getting a job, although the education + connections from professors would. A degree might be useful if I ever want to teach. In other lines of video/film work a degree might make it more likely you'll be promoted.
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Old February 25th, 2004, 10:41 PM   #23
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Rob,

I know exactly what you are saying and i stand by my feeling that most of the people that will comment in a negative way are jealous. I've got news for you, these people are still "knobs" in middle age.

I agree that it does take fortitude to work around a younger group.
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Old February 26th, 2004, 09:46 AM   #24
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Bryan,

I know exactly what you are saying and I stand by my feeling that this is an audio forum for discussing microphones and other audio-related topics. I've got news for you, we're going to knock off the thread hijacking and get back on track with the proper subject matter.

I agree that it does take fortitude to stay focused on discussing microphone recommendations, which is supposed to be the topic of this thread.
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