Running two Sennheiser Evolution G2 units - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:19 PM   #16
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Norcross, GA
Posts: 143
Quick question

This might sound crazy but just curious. If you get two G2's and they are both the A version can you utilize both of those just as long as they are on different channels and they each have a receiver and transmitter if that makes sense? I'm about to buy some wireless mics and I wondered could you have two A versions or do I need to buy an A version and a B version? Just wondering. I read through everyone's postings but just want to clarify.


Thanks
Nicole
Nicole Hankerson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:23 PM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Nashua NH
Posts: 278
Hi Nicole, yes as long as they have thier own reciever and transmitter they can both be on same band, just pick w different frequencies.

Watch out for C band as FCC has reclaimed these and they are ilegal to use now.

A = 518 and 554Mhz (good)
B = 626MHz to 668MHz (good)
C = 698MHz to 806Mhz (Bad)

We have an "A" and "B" band now - just won an ebay auction for a used G2 system for $340 ~
Rich Perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:37 PM   #18
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 1,844
"Not sure if random females would like me messing with their bra straps but I am willing to try :)"

With pro actresses it's usually not an issue, but otherwise you will have to 'feel' the situation out. no pun.. -pun. With females in question, I usually instruct them how and where to put the mic, 7 out of 10 times, they say, you can do it. Oh course I'm a non-threatening 50 yr old. Later on I'll often say to the cam-op "nice-set-a-hooters on so-and so, huh?"
Sorry can't help myself. :)
Rick Reineke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:49 PM   #19
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Norcross, GA
Posts: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Perry View Post
Hi Nicole, yes as long as they have thier own reciever and transmitter they can both be on same band, just pick w different frequencies.

Watch out for C band as FCC has reclaimed these and they are ilegal to use now.

A = 518 and 554Mhz (good)
B = 626MHz to 668MHz (good)
C = 698MHz to 806Mhz (Bad)

We have an "A" and "B" band now - just won an ebay auction for a used G2 system for $340 ~
Thanks I thought so but when I'm unsure I ask. Congratulations on the Ebay Auction!!!
Nicole Hankerson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:52 PM   #20
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Nashua NH
Posts: 278
hehe.... thats too funny Rick :)
Rich Perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 06:56 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Nashua NH
Posts: 278
Thanks Nicole! eBay is a bit hit or miss, the last time I bought a used G2 system the transmitter died after a few weeks, but sennheiser have awesome support. It cost I think $70 for a flat fee service charge, (I had no warrenty) they ended up replacing the board and getting it back to me in under a week.
Rich Perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2009, 07:17 PM   #22
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 1,844
Hi Nicole, You can have many systems going in the one block. Always do a freg. scan, turning on and scanning one-system-at-a-time, sequentially.
Often I use a single transmitter to send audio (camera hops) to two cameras, both recvs. on the same channel.... However, you cant do this the other way around. two tramsmiters, one recvr.
Rick Reineke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2009, 07:33 AM   #23
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Most questions Have been answered - but please note that the new G3 has replaced the old G2 systems.

The new G3 camera receivers are now diversity (using the output cable as the second antenna) and – also – there is a new “G” band for the USA (in-between the “A” and “B” versions).

I hope this helps.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2009, 09:22 AM   #24
Trustee
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Miami, FL USA
Posts: 1,483
It is possible for two Senny transmitters to interfere with each other, see page 32 of the G2 manual; for multi-channel operation you should use the free channels in one channel bank. We have had some intermodulation interference in using randomly-selected frequencies, even between transmitters such as one on A band and one on C band....no big thing, you just have to be aware to turn off the transmitters, scan a channel bank on a receiver and lock out conflicting frequencies, then apply the results to all your units, setting them all to open frequencies in one channel bank.../Battle Vaughan PS: I should point out, this is radio frequency interferance, it is not a phase problem from mic placement, that is an entirely separate problem.

Last edited by Battle Vaughan; August 10th, 2009 at 11:06 AM.
Battle Vaughan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2009, 10:50 AM   #25
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: LOWESTOFT - UK
Posts: 2,126
There are two potential issues here. ANY two microphones (with cable or radio link) can exhibit partial or complete cancellation when used close together and then summed into mono, or placed in the same stereo location, sound field wise. It happens no end running microphones on stage. As the two people get closer, there is a characteristic hollowness that begins to get stronger as they get closer. In most cases, as the mics are omnis, as they get closer, our usual technique is to dip the audio from the mic on the strongest voice as this gets picked up on the other anyway. Sometimes you have to live with a slightly poor balance between the participants when they are close. The phenomena is called comb filtering - Google will provide details, but it is a pain. Using a radio system or not makes no difference to this problem. Live, and of course in post, it's often possible to prod a button and reverse the polarity on one or the other. The result will be worse, or better - so you can choose which works best. In radio systems, having two transmitters next to each other rarely causes issues with decently design products like the Sennheisers and others. Two receivers again cause little trouble if placed together. What radio systems don't like is a transmitter for one channel being right next to the receiver for another. The usual result of this is that the apparent sensitivity of the receiver is degraded. In video terms, if you have a person with one transmitter a way away, with a nice strong signal at the receiver on the camera, all is well until the person with the other transmitter comes and stands next to the camera, when the more distant person's signal appears to wither and die. Often, people blame the batteries, fit a new set and all seems cured, until the other person gets close again.

The common problem of comb filtering may not be noticed during recording if the sound guy has ch 1 on the left ear and channel 2 on the right. All sounds well, but in the edit suite, when both channels are panned into mono - it sounds hollow and boxy. Pan them apart a little, and experiment with the polarity, and it's usually possible to make it sound as it should.
Paul R Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 11th, 2009, 12:24 PM   #26
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
"Not sure if random females would like me messing with their bra straps but I am willing to try :)"

Frankly, I always ask production for a female PA or somebody to help me with this. It's best for all concerned, trust me. The actress is reassured you're not a creep, the PA gets out of having to go get lunch, and I pick up an extra hand on the busy shots (but just the busy shots, don't abuse this).
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 01:26 PM   #27
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Nattrass View Post
... if you look at my G2 mics on the video clips I have the stock sennheiser hard windshield on them with a radio shack soft foam wind gag added on top to diffuse any wind or pops.

As for placement chest is best as all omni mics like the G2 ones benefit from a bit of chest cavity resonance that is why lavs tend to sound worse on females as those frontal projections absorb a lot of the chest resonance.
Are those the ME2s?
__________________
Panasonic HMC150/Canon A1/JVC HD1/Sony Vegas 8.0c
Jeff Kellam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 02:06 PM   #28
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Nashua NH
Posts: 278
Paul this is pretty much confirms as I had suspected with the audio and comb filtering as I have seen it a lot in studio settings and figured it could be an issue, thanks for the advice. As far as the Bra straps are concerned Marco, that was just a cheap joke on my part :)
Rich Perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2009, 11:29 AM   #29
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
I know you were just joking Rich. Still, if you work with wireless much, you'll find this is a very serious issue.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2009, 11:31 AM   #30
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cornsay Durham UK
Posts: 1,941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Kellam View Post
Are those the ME2s?
The mics are the stock ones that came with the G2 set which I think are the ME2's
__________________
Over 15 minutes in Broadcast Film and TV production: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1044352/
Gary Nattrass is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:52 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network