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Old August 23rd, 2004, 09:11 AM   #1
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Richmond, VA
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Mic Interference

Hey all, I have a question. I did my first wedding with my new equipment this weekend. And I had a question in reference to interference with my wireless mike. Now granted, I didn't buy a 3000.00 mic, I have an AT 88wpro. I noticed that when the subject put his arm overtop of the wire that is from the mic to the receiver, that I got interference. Almost as if the mic was acting as an antenna and you would cover up the antenna. Is this normal, or is it because the mic that Audio Technica came with may not be the best. Incidentally, the interference was most prevalent under these spot lights in the church, the can type lights. Just wondering. Again, the interference was only when the subject would cross his arms or cover the cord that went from the receiver to the actual mic. Thanks in advance for your comments and information.
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 12:21 PM   #2
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Location: Hudson, Ohio
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Steven,

In the Pro-88W as with most VHF bodypack wireless systems, the tranmitter antenna is actually the mic cable between the clip-on mic and the transmitter. (UHF transmitters will have a short whip or helical antenna attached to the bodypack.)

So, when the subject covered the mic wire with his arm, he essentially coverd the antenna reducing range and casuing the system to dropout. The interference you heard was the loss of transmitter signal. This can oocour with any type of wireless including the high end expensive systems as the human body is a great absorber of RF signals.

For best results, dress the mic cable in such a way as it can not be covered by the subjects arm, maintain good line of sight between the transmitter and receiver antennas, always use fresh high quality alkaline batteries for both transmitter and receiver, and watch the distance between them. (For the Pro88W one hundred feet -line of sight is preety good.)

The Pro 88W is actually a fairly good wireless sytem for its price point. Many filmmakers use it for short range wireless due to its good sound quality and affordability. However, like any wireless system, you are dealing with Radio signals which are susceptable to all forms of interference.

Hope this helps...
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Old August 23rd, 2004, 03:51 PM   #3
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Now that information just helped out a ton. Thank you so much for taking the time to help. My issue makes a lot of sense now. And yes, I agree that the system sounded good. I was tickeled to hear on my recording the actual breaking of the bread for communion. It was distinct and gave me plenty of raw audio to work with. Thanks again for the information. Now it all makes sense.
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