Where to get really tall mic stands (Toronto, Canada) at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 10th, 2004, 11:34 PM   #1
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Where to get really tall mic stands (Toronto, Canada)

A- Where can these be bought? Most I've seen aren't long enough. Trew Audio in Toronto lists long boom poles, but I would have to figure out how to secure them.
B- If these are easily built, what parts are necessary and how would I be able to build two?

---

The problem:
I want to record a music recital in an auditorium. The auditorium setup is such that there is a stage (risers). The front row of the audience is seated ~3ft away from the band/orchestra.

The best placement for the mics (stereo pair) I believe is several feet back from the conductor and a few to several feet in the air to avoid audience noise.
There is a balcony where I can put mic stands on. This is probably the ideal position if I have really tall mic stands. I should probably try to get pictures and/or measurements but I believe the mic stands would have to be about 15-20feet long.

The alternate position is having 2 mic stands in the seating area. This takes up a few seats and kind of obscures the people behind. It shouldn't be THAT bad however. But again, really tall mic stands would be required.

Budget: A few hundred dollars or less (we have lots of other people's money to spend, but would need to justify the expense). My friend kinda like building/hacking stuff together so a do-it-yourself solution is perfectly acceptable.

Safety is important. It's real bad if these mic stands fall over.

I have yet to buy/rent mics so if a single stereo (or mono) microphone is a better solution then I'm open to that.

This is for a friend of mine running a high school club I used to run so the real goals are:
A- Educational- the people in the club are supposed to learn.
B- The recordings will be sold, so "good enough" quality is required. We're not looking for audiophile sound quality at all.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2004, 12:09 AM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Barrie, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,922
Take a run down to Trew and ask Reynald what he suggests. they have a full rental setup. Talk to Reynald, he's had more than a few years in the business.

Your other option is to stop by White/Cinniquip. I know they'd have something in a rental. Terry has a stage/music background

They're all nice people and will help, especially a student.
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ".......holy smokin rubber lips...what a ride!"
Bryan Beasleigh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2004, 08:52 AM   #3
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Suwanee, GA
Posts: 1,241
I have seen a symphonic configuration with many of the mics hanging from the lighting rigs (UGA did this for a high school 'competition'). Have you considered that?
George Ellis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2004, 06:31 PM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Burlington
Posts: 1,961
Shure used to make very tall stands for this exact purpose, but I don't know if they are still available new. I know rental houses have them, but I can't find the model number. I think they went close to 20 feet if I remember correctly.
It's pretty easy to convert a good lightstand for this job, although generally they are going to max out at 10 to 12 feet for the easily available models. Heavier duty ones will go higher.
Both Bogen/Manfrotto and SmithVictor have converters that go from 5/8" lightstand stud to 1/4"-20 male threads. It's easy to convert this to 3/8"-16 for attaching an adjustable shockmount.
Unless you have plenty of time for experimentation, it's usually easier to use one stand with a stereo bar on top.
I wouldn't attempt this on anything but a smooth, clean and level floor. High-quality gaffers tape and substantial sandbags will be essential for safety. Having a person sit within arm's reach, but not actually touching the stand is a good last defence.
Jay Massengill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2004, 07:51 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Thanks for the replies so far! It looks like I should be getting in touch with Trew audio and White's/Cinequip.

Quote:
I have seen a symphonic configuration with many of the mics hanging from the lighting rigs (UGA did this for a high school 'competition'). Have you considered that?
There isn't a lighting rig above the stage. There is a lighting area in the ceiling, but that's really hard to get access to. It's kind of like an attic, there's probably abestos in there, lots of dust, and the floor is not one designed for walking on. To put mics up there's we'd need special permission (it's locked) and we'd need to hire contractors. It seems a better idea to just get one or two really tall stands.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2004, 09:04 AM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Burlington
Posts: 1,961
Shure does still list them new, but they don't go as high as I thought. 14 feet should be fine though.

http://www.shure.com/accessories/s15a.asp?P=acc-booms&PN=Booms%20and%20Stands
Jay Massengill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2004, 09:10 AM   #7
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Suwanee, GA
Posts: 1,241
I have a Shure 15A. Available from B&H. Comes with a bag and has a regular screw-in post on top. I do recommend using stakes or anchor ropes if used outside in the wind (mine blew over during a big gust.)

The only concern I would have with it is that it could interfer with the sight-line of the audience.
George Ellis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2004, 01:46 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 229
If you really need a 20' stand and don't want to spend a whole lot, you can get a regular 13' light stand with a 7' extension along with a 5/8" mic thread adapter. The total along with shipping to Canada should cost you no more then $150.00

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=253066&is=REG

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ku=5364&is=REG

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=232827&is=REG

If you want to mount a stereo pair you can add the Bogan triple mic adapter along with 2 more of the 5/8 thread adapters.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ku=5365&is=REG
Marty Wein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2004, 01:00 PM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: London, England
Posts: 126
I am not clear about the layout of your auditorium, but could you either
1) string a heavy nylon fishing line across the hall, either lengthways or sideways (maybe from the gallery?). Attach the microphone to the line, with a DIY mounting.
2) Use (borrow?) a fishing pole to suspend the microphone, again maybe from the gallery. Fishing poles can be up to 30 feet long.

Patrick
Patrick Bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2004, 01:06 PM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Hmm I was thinking of something more along the lines of a jib, which could go out horizontally around 15 feet. It would go on the balcony and the mic would go out above the audience (hence, safety issues).

Mic stands that go up vertically would also work except it would kind of block the sight lines of the audience. I will check to see if it's ok with the organizers. I wonder if they can be decorated...
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2004, 06:51 PM   #11
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Barrie, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,922
Leave the stands plain old black. You start "decorating' and you start to p!ss the people off. JMHO
__________________
Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ".......holy smokin rubber lips...what a ride!"
Bryan Beasleigh is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:13 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network