Need help picking voice over mic - Page 3 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 15th, 2006, 08:59 AM   #31
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
Another low cost v/o mic that sounds a lot better than I expected it to is the AT 2020. Just mixed a piece with vocals done thru this mic, and boy, was I surprised.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 18th, 2006, 10:31 PM   #32
Tourist
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4
Adding a Preamp

Is there a Preamp out there that can make a good number of condensers sound even better for VO work or is it really a mix and match thing? For example what pre would go best with a Rode NT1000 and/or a Senn 416?
__________________
Martin V.Yap
Yappy Dog Productions
http://www.martinyap.com
Martin Yap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 06:31 AM   #33
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,483
Well, all I know about it is I used the NT1000 with
a Sound Devices Pre and the mic was too
harsh for my taste.
Dave Largent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 07:10 AM   #34
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
There are several "dark" sounding mic pres that can help, but more to the point, there are a LOT of crappy mics out there. They are there because the makers are competing on price wit products imported from China.

Not even Superman's preamp can save these mics.

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 08:42 AM   #35
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
I just read through this thread and noticed people pointing out room acoustics as being important. They absolutely are. You need the room to be as quiet as possible but you have a home studio and there are dogs, birds, cars, lawnmowers, etc. outside.

I have the simplest and cheapest fix for all of that and am surprised no one mentioned it already. It's a method I use here in my home studio for V/O work.

RECORD LATE AT NIGHT!

That's right, instead of hanging out here on the board at 2am, you should be taking advantage of the quiet world outside. I did this on a recent project and recorded ambient room tone using an Oktava MK219 into the XL-2 preamps (surprisingly quiet). Ambient room level was at -54db and I set voice level to peak at -12 to -9 on the XL-2 audio meters. I monitored the audio with a nice set of headphones out the XL-2 headphone jack to make sure there was no audio distortion (meters won't tell you that).

That -54 db was easy to get rid of by batch processing the audio files through a noise gate set at -50db threshold. The result is absolute silence between phrases.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 09:47 AM   #36
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Media, PA
Posts: 144
I just wanted to throw this out there. Sometimes while recording vocalists, a large diaphragm dynamic mic is perfect. The vocal mic doesn't always have to be a condenser. If you're trying mics out with your voice, check out a Shure Sm7 or an EV RE-20. Different mics work for different voices.
Tim Gray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 10:45 AM   #37
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 475
There is no one size fits all when it comes to mics. As has been discussed here are are a lot of factors involved, including room acoustics, recording environment, etc. Not to mention the individual voice being recorded. (Why do you think recording studios have a mic closet, filled with various makes and types of mics?)VO talent spend a lot of time and research in finding what works on their voice in their space.

Condensors are great, I have a Rode NT2, but I also use an SM58 at times. Both sound good on my voice but the 58 rejects background noise better. I used an RE20 in my radio days and loved that (one of these days the budget will allow another tool) Sometimes I swear I can hear the sound of my toenails growing on the Rode. LOL.

Best advice I can give is to see if you can trial some mics in your recording space and see what works best on your voice.

I have a montage sample up on my site, some with the Rode some with the SM58.

FWIW I bought my NT2 2nd hand, the windscreen was broken in shipping(the connection to the body tube) I emailed Rode, the president responded, I sent the mic to their US office, they repaired the screen and even replaced the capsule, at no charge (even though if I had purchased it new the warranty would NOT have covered the shipping damage). They recently send me several packs of replacement bands for the shock mount as well.

Gotta love a company that knows how to treat customers well.
Bill Mecca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 12:46 PM   #38
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,483
I mentioned here that I had received a new NT1000
from B&H which had the screen broken off from the
body.
Dave Largent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 02:45 PM   #39
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Largent
I mentioned here that I had received a new NT1000
from B&H which had the screen broken off from the
body.
Dave if you still have it I would suggest contacting Rode directly. It worked for me.
Bill Mecca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 02:47 PM   #40
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,483
I got rid of it ... too bright for my tastes.
Dave Largent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 02:47 PM   #41
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,483
...........

Last edited by Dave Largent; April 19th, 2006 at 08:13 PM.
Dave Largent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 03:58 PM   #42
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: HI
Posts: 93
I may have missed it but have you checked in to the EV RE50? ENG standard excellent isolation, you can use it both in the studio and the field. Another for in ~house might be the Shure SM-58...Both of these mics are price in the under or around the $200 range new and will last a lifetime.
__________________
_________
Mick
Mick Isdes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2006, 06:08 PM   #43
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
I have the Sure SM58B which has a newer diaphram design and is able to limit proximity effect very well. Haven't used it as a v/o mic yet, just for vocals when performing with our band.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2006, 11:48 AM   #44
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Costa Mesa, The OC, CA
Posts: 87
I like my sure KSM27 ~$300
Phil Hover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2006, 08:22 PM   #45
Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Posts: 4
Although everything said about proper room set up is true, microphones make a huge difference. I did a professional VO session yesterday for a show on TLC (as talent) and the production company had a short AT shotgun set up because earlier they were picking up some lines to match field footage already shot.

But it sounded too crisp and forward for the narration -- it's a mic colored toward clarity rather than a rounded, warm VO mic colored toward gravitas. Needed to change it out to match the previous week's session.

Even the most informal style of VO needs to have a certain voice-inside-your-head quality and a warm mic is usually best. Your typical ENG mic or shotgun is too unforgiving.

One good cheap solution is the AT3035. Last year I listened to the whole AT large diaphram line at NAB in a small booth. Very lively and warm for the money. Worth the few dollars more over the 2020. I bought one and like it better than the Shure SM7 dynamic, a radio & VO standard costing about twice as much.

There are lots of other choices. You might also check out some of the mic shootouts below.

www.transom.org/tools/recordi..._shootout.html

www.digitalprosound.com/2002/...c_shootout.htm

www.dvestore.com/theatre/mics_guide.html

Proper VO processing -- compression, noise gate, de-essing, etc -- is a whole other topic, but is also part of what separates professional from so-so VO sound.
Mark Schubb is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network