Which of these Sennheiser wireless mics is best for interviewing? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 20th, 2010, 03:46 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: London
Posts: 160
Which of these Sennheiser wireless mics is best for interviewing?

I need to get one of these Sennheiser mics but don't know which one to get. I already have the receivers.

They are:

SKM 100-835 G3
Hand-held transmitter, dynamic cardioid mirophone capsule


SKM 100-845 G3
Hand-held transmitter, with super-cardioid dynamic capsule


SKM 100-865 G3
Hand-held transmitter with super-cardioid condenser capsule


Cardoid, dynamic, condensor...... have no idea what they mean so am at a loss as to which one I should get.

I need a mic for mainly outdoor interviewing.

Any suggestion for the best one?

Thanks
Syeed Ali is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2010, 06:09 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Hollywood, CA, United States
Posts: 790
I would personally get an Electro-Voice RE50 and the SKP 100 G3. The RE50 is thr workhorse of interview mics. If you've ever seen an on-the-street interview on the news, they are probably using an RE50. Another benefit is that you can unplug the SKP 100 and use it wired, too.
Edward Carlson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2010, 06:39 PM   #3
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 1,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syeed Ali View Post
I need to get one of these Sennheiser mics but don't know which one to get. I already have the receivers.

They are:

SKM 100-835 G3
Hand-held transmitter, dynamic cardioid mirophone capsule


SKM 100-845 G3
Hand-held transmitter, with super-cardioid dynamic capsule


SKM 100-865 G3
Hand-held transmitter with super-cardioid condenser capsule


Cardoid, dynamic, condensor...... have no idea what they mean so am at a loss as to which one I should get.

I need a mic for mainly outdoor interviewing.

Any suggestion for the best one?

Thanks
The above mics are designed more for performance vocals. (singing)
For a reporter's type interview mic, I concur with Edward. And as Edward also stated, you would need the butt-plug type transmitter.
For the usual G series H/H transmitters, I don't know which omni heads are available.
Rick Reineke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 02:06 AM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: LOWESTOFT - UK
Posts: 2,123
Those 3 mic capsules are the standard handhelds, and even though they are G3 versions, the actual mic capsules are from the 835/845/865 cabled mics. An awful lot of people love the sound of these for live events - the 835 is quite warm sounding, compared to a Shure SM58, the usual competitor for this role - however, the 845, with narrower response pattern is great when you need a little more gain before feedback, although it does from time to time cause a few feedback issues with over-loud floor monitors - close in, the sound is still warm, but has a little more 'edge' that the 835. The condenser head, the 865 is much crisper, and has lots more top end (although I'd have to admit my own hearing isn't so good at the very top any longer - BUT I can still hear a big difference.

These mics are all designed for close in work - as in the mesh almost on the lips - so as an interview mic, used further away, their sound is going to be thinner. I do use them for video whenever the event will be loud and the presenter needs to have them really close in to reduce the ambient sound - interviews in nightclubs, or at concerts - that kind of thing. They are also very heavy mics, and you don't want the presenter waving them around close to people's mouths - it's really easy to whack the interviewee in the mouth - I've seen it happen lots of times. A thump from one of these is a bruised lip! The plug-in transmitter mentioned is a good choice as you can plug in your favourite mic, although I usually use mine on the end of a short cable, as the combination of mic and transmitter can again be quite a large ugly lump.
Paul R Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 06:05 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Your best option for interviewing is to get the SKP 100 G3 plug-on transmitter and use it with either an MD 42 (omni) or MD 46 (cardioid) reporter mic.

I saw John Simpson on the BBC using exactly that combination recently.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 06:17 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Posts: 475
But, if you have to choose between the 3 I will go for the 835 since that's the less cardioid of the 3.
Vincent Rozenberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 06:32 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent Rozenberg View Post
But, if you have to choose between the 3 I will go for the 835 since that's the less cardioid of the 3.
Er - actually the 835 is the *only* cardioid of the three.

The others are not cardioid at all, but super-cardioid.

But I agree with the 835 choice if you *have* to go that route.

The SKP + MD42/46 is the much better option.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 06:58 AM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 2,835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul R Johnson View Post
The plug-in transmitter mentioned is a good choice as you can plug in your favourite mic, although I usually use mine on the end of a short cable, as the combination of mic and transmitter can again be quite a large ugly lump.
Ditto - I've used my Senny e835 (the cabled mic version) with a 1 Meter cable to plug it into my SKP500 transmitter which the interviewer can have on his/her belt and so lessen the weight and this has worked really well for me, even in pretty noisy environments.

I had n't thought about an unskilled interviewer wacking someone in the mouth with one of these heavy mics - but now you've mentioned it I can see it's probably only a matter of time/I've been lucky so far! I'll make sure I point out the risk to any interviewers next time it gets taken out of the bag to get used. I've also tried the SKP500 directly attached to the bottom of this mic but it's way to heavy and too big a combination for comfortable use for my liking.
__________________
Andy K Wilkinson - http://www.shootingimage.co.uk
Cambridge (UK) Corporate Video Production
Andy Wilkinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 07:21 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Wilkinson View Post
I had n't thought about an unskilled interviewer wacking someone in the mouth with one of these heavy mics - but now you've mentioned it I can see it's probably only a matter of time/I've been lucky so far!
This is just bad mic. technique.

The interviewer should *not* wave the mic. about at all - firstly it is aggressive an off-putting to the interviewee and, secondly, the interviewee is more nervous and aware of the recording.

The correct way is to hold the microphone (ideally omni or cardioid) vertically and stationary between the interviewer and interviewee with your hand about waist height if you have a normal reporter mic.. Adjust for level be moving it towards or away from the interviewee (IE: closer to him/her if he/she is quietly spoken, or towards you if he/she is noisier).

Keep the microphone still and not moving throughout the interview.

The interviewee quickly forgets the mic. and you get a more natural interview, also, if you are videoing, the viewer is not aware of a microphone waving about and will listen to the interview rather than being put-off by the mic. waving around.

This is just good practice - unfortunately modern broadcasters do not do proper training anymore and you can see it (and hear it) in much of the stuff that gets put out nowadays.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 07:40 AM   #10
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 24
The 835 for your purpose.
__________________
Romuald Martin
http://videoproiq.blogspot.com/
Romuald Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 09:49 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romuald Martin View Post
The 835 for your purpose.
Yes, of the three proposed - but the SKP 100 with MD 42 or MD 46 is by far the better option for interviewing.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2010, 09:07 PM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Hollywood, CA and Roma, Italia
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syeed Ali View Post
I need to get one of these Sennheiser mics but don't know which one to get. I already have the receivers.
The Senny MD46 is THE US broadcast stations interview mic standard (and when I go to Cannes, it is also the overwhelming choice of most foreign broadcasters as well). I have yet to shoot interviews for a US broadcaster that did not use it. Mate it to the cube of your choice, and it's hardwire capable as well.

It was designed especially for NBC's Olympic Games coverage. It has no handling noise, and amazing off-axis rejection. I once heard the top sound guy at CNN say that the only interview mic better then the MD46, was two MD46's (one as a backup). I have never had a MD46 fail, even when they have been dropped several times. it's just a great mic.

Moving the mic... It depends on what type of interviews I guess. I shoot a lot of entertainment sector interviews, and there is a certain flow to an interview that the talent understands, Mic to the interviewer, question. Mic to the talent, waiting for an answer. I think the trick is in the wrist. You don't so much as swing the mic, you just cant it back and forth.

I would guess that I have done something like 5 or 6 thousand interviews by now (last year we did 542 interviews in just five days at Comic-Con for NBCU & EW), and I have never seen the talent hit by the interview mic. BUT I have seen talent hit by a shotgun mic on a boom pole a couple of different times, ouch!
__________________
Enzo Giobbé
www.enzogiobbe.com

Last edited by Enzo Giobbé; June 21st, 2010 at 09:13 PM. Reason: Correction
Enzo Giobbé is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22nd, 2010, 05:27 AM   #13
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Posts: 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enzo Giobbé View Post
The Senny MD46 is THE US broadcast stations interview mic standard (and when I go to Cannes, it is also the overwhelming choice of most foreign broadcasters as well). I have yet to shoot interviews for a US broadcaster that did not use it. Mate it to the cube of your choice, and it's hardwire capable as well.
It *could* also be the MD 42, especially in Europe as the MD 46 and MD 42 look identical as they share the same body.

The BBC in the UK prefer the omni pattern over the cardioid.

But both the 46 and 42 are excellent interview mics.
__________________
John Willett - Sound-Link ProAudio and Circle Sound Services
President: Fédération Internationale des Chasseurs de Sons
John Willett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22nd, 2010, 07:52 AM   #14
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: London
Posts: 160
Thanks everyone for your help and advice.

I've gone for a RE50 and the Sennheiser SKP100 wireless sender in the end.

I was going to get the MD42 but it's too long, although I may get one later.

Thanks again everyone.
Syeed Ali is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22nd, 2010, 10:27 PM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Hollywood, CA and Roma, Italia
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Willett View Post
It *could* also be the MD 42, especially in Europe as the MD 46 and MD 42 look identical as they share the same body.

The BBC in the UK prefer the omni pattern over the cardioid.

But both the 46 and 42 are excellent interview mics.
Yes John, you are correct.

I have used the MD42 as well. It actually does better than the 46 with one on one interviews with not a lot of ambient noise around, but given a situation that has 1000 fans screaming "Megan Fox! Megan Fox! Megan Fox! right behind you, the MD46 really excels.

The extra length of either mic is an important interview feature. Senny made it that way after looking at many, many on-camera interviews.

Either mic also balances very well, and the shafts are the standard mic flag diameter.
__________________
Enzo Giobbé
www.enzogiobbe.com
Enzo Giobbé is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:42 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network