XLR cables - good brand? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 5th, 2010, 12:13 AM   #16
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sydney.
Posts: 2,569
Neil, you can buy better (and cheaper) by just scrolling down that Amazon page.

Scroll down to 'What Do Customers Ultimately Buy' etc.

75% buy the no (recognised) name cable with the no (recognisable) name XLRs and only 6% buy the same length Audio Technica at over two bucks cheaper .. and with Neutrik XLRs too.
Next time :)

To be honest, at 25' I don't think you'd notice any difference from your Senn to AX2000 .. enjoy!
Cheers.
__________________
30+ years with our own audio and visual production company and studios.
Allan Black is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 12:21 AM   #17
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Les Wilson View Post
On the Switchcraft design,....The Neutrik requires no tools,...

The Switchcraft strain relief is a thin metal type that is crimped over the cable jacket.
I have been using Switchcraft connectors for almost 50 years, and Neutrik since they have become available in North America. If you think that a Switchcraft has any kind of crimped strain relief, then you aren't talking about the kind of Switchcraft XLR-style connectors the rest of us recognize. There are no Switchcraft XLR-style connectors that use anything "crimped".

You are also comparing at least a 40 year old Switchcraft design (which was light-years ahead of the previous, original Canon design) to a modern (Neutrik) design. The Switchcraft design was put into distribution back when the Neutrik designers were still in diapers. Note that the current (new) version of Switchcraft XLR-style connectors use the same design as Neutrik.

Note further that the Switchcraft shells are solid steel while the Neutrik are moulded pot-metal. I have never seen a Switchcraft connector shatter, even when driven over by a semi-truck. OTOH, I have several Neutrik shells that are just shattered because of the (low) quality of the metalurgy.
Richard Crowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 10:01 AM   #18
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Boca Raton, FL
Posts: 2,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
...If you think that a Switchcraft has any kind of crimped strain relief, then you aren't talking about the kind of Switchcraft XLR-style connectors the rest of us recognize.
If they aren't Switchcraft, then I stand corrected about the crimping and cheap solder terminals. The attached is from a 5 year old Production Intercom headset that failed after less than 50 insertions. Sure looks like the type of Switchcraft in the market Neil was looking:
http://www.amazon.com/Switchcraft-Q-G-Audio-connector-pin/dp/B0002GZ7F0
Can you post a picture of a "real" one? I'll open up the other ones in the repair bin I inherited and compare.
Attached Thumbnails
XLR cables - good brand?-swtchcrft.jpg  
Les Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 10:09 AM   #19
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Boca Raton, FL
Posts: 2,979
From the Switchcraft website:
Attached Thumbnails
XLR cables - good brand?-screen-shot-2010-08-05-11.06.08-am.png  
Les Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 10:26 AM   #20
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New York City
Posts: 523
I've only used DIY brand!

Both switchcraft and neutrik have different lines of connectors. That switchcraft above could be fake? Looking closer, I don't think it is a switchcraft. Looks vaguely similar but its a knockoff.

For heavy duty use, I prefer switchcraft The housing is really beefy and up to being driven over (probably). On male Neutriks, that little retention tab can break fairly easily--not a deal breaker as by the time it does break, it will also be slightly deformed so there will be a tight connection.

Neutriks are much easy to solder. Switchcraft has their picture under PITA in the dictionary. If you're gonna build a lot of cables, I'd hate to be using switchcraft.

Canare is the gold standard for cable but other shielded quad cables are OK too. For whatever reason, most of 'em are tricky to solder.
__________________
Andy Tejral
Railroad Videographer
Andy Tejral is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 06:15 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 262
I do solder cables for a living (been in AV industry since '92), and I HATE Neutrik connectors, sorry.
give me an A3f or A3m anyday. they consist of 2 major pieces and not 4 (big plus).
The new switchcraft AAA series (I believe) kinda take the best of both worlds and is IMHO the best XLR produced to date. milled solder cups beats the hell out of rolled or stamped sheet metal.

just my 2 cents
Gerry Gallegos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 06:21 PM   #22
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sydney.
Posts: 2,569
Kinda O/T but I'll slip this in here for laffs. In the early 60s as an 18yr old I was the first audio wallah at the brand new NBN CH3 TV station in Newcastle north of Sydney.

NBN had bought a complete RCA package, video, audio, right through including the transmitter. But no male XLR connectors arrived, so for about the first 3 weeks on air I used to poke the 3 mic cable strands into the fem. wall panel XLRs .. for every mic at the station.

To keep them in place, each guy in the floor crew carried a box of headless matches to jam a matchstick in with each strand, to go live on air. A loop of cable was tied etc.

It seemed to me the musos in our 12pce house band thought it was normal practice. True story.
Cheers.
__________________
30+ years with our own audio and visual production company and studios.
Allan Black is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2010, 01:13 AM   #23
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,177
I couldn't find a photo of the innards of an A3F (female as you have), but here is a photo of an A3M and the insides are virtually identical.

http://chesterelectronics.com/images/A3M.jpg

I've been using Switchcraft connectors for almost 50 years and I've never seen a connector like the one in your photo, except as a cheap no-name knock-off. If they used such a cheap connector, I would expect the rest of the apparatus to be equally shoddy. My sympathy to you.
Richard Crowley is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:20 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network