Are 2 NT3s better than one? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 27th, 2005, 12:00 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 77
Are 2 NT3s better than one?

Hey everyone,
I have been using a rode NT3 for some time now as a boom and general mic, and have been quite happy with the sound. I am thinking of getting another one for stereo, and I may be opening up a can of worms here, should I get a "stereo" mic instead, such as the NT5 or another stereo mic? I mostly shoot interviews and short scenes in a single room and so with 2 mics I could place them appart for a wide audio field, of course a stereo mic wouldn't be able to do that. any thoughts? Mark
__________________
DVX100a, PV-DV953
Rode NT3, NT1a, videomic
Raynox HD6600pro WA Lens
Vegas6+DVD
Mark Burlingame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2005, 01:19 PM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Burlington
Posts: 1,961
I'd get another NT-3 unless you have a source of dual phantom power that the NT-5 pair would require. The single-point stereo NT4 can run on a battery like the NT-3 can, but as you mentioned it couldn't be physically separated.
All the Rode mics are substantially better in self-noise than the AT825, the other most common solution for single-point, battery-powered stereo.
If you do have phantom power, then there are other mics you could combine with the NT-3 to get two-track coverage. Like the new AudioTechnica U873r.
But you wouldn't use them together for true stereo, you'd use them to cover two separated subjects and then edit it together in post-production.
If true stereo is more important, then there are other phantom-powered mics that you could get besides the NT-5 pair. Like a pair of AT3031's. They are slightly lower in self-noise, have flatter frequency response, a switchable pad, bass roll-off and you can buy them separately to spread the cost out.
Jay Massengill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2005, 01:26 PM   #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
I'd concur with Jay, unless you can afford a pair of matched omni's for wide spread, a matched NT3 would be close, and a good option. The NT4 is a great sounding single point, but...
The AT 3031's are great, but given my druthers...I'd go for a pair of 4049's, myself. :-)
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2005, 01:49 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 77
Thanks guys! It seems, given the price getting another NT3 is a no-brainer regardless of getting other mics (can one have too many microphones?...) I think I am getting a DVX100a, which supplies phantom power, and I am still very much in the newbie/beginner category so my soon be the new "phantom menace!" ;) (I can only pray I am not as bad as the "other one" ) Mark
__________________
DVX100a, PV-DV953
Rode NT3, NT1a, videomic
Raynox HD6600pro WA Lens
Vegas6+DVD
Mark Burlingame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2005, 02:20 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Burlingame
Hey everyone,
I have been using a rode NT3 for some time now as a boom and general mic, and have been quite happy with the sound. I am thinking of getting another one for stereo, and I may be opening up a can of worms here, should I get a "stereo" mic instead, such as the NT5 or another stereo mic? I mostly shoot interviews and short scenes in a single room and so with 2 mics I could place them appart for a wide audio field, of course a stereo mic wouldn't be able to do that. any thoughts? Mark
Just FYI - spacing the microphones widely apart does not in itself create a wide stereo field in the playback. In fact, having the two mics so closely spaced they're almost touching, the so-called "X-Y" mic arrangment can create a very wide and stable field. Take two cardoid mics and put them together on a stand on the edge of the stage, capsules as close as possible without actually touching. Arrange them in a "V" with the point toward the centre of the stage so their centrelines cross at about a 75 degree angle, the right hand mic pointing to the middle of the performers on the left side of stage centre and the left hand mic pointing to performers on the right side of stage centre. Record the right hand mic as the LEFT channel and the left hand mic as the RIGHT channel.

Some of the most dramatic music with the most precise positioning and a room filling field that I've ever heard was a master tape recorded by Deutche Grammaphone of the NY Philarmonic and Chorus recorded in St Patricks cathedral using a single pair of a mics in a setup known as a Bluemlein array where the mics are similarly arranged together in the same spot on the stage.
Steve House is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:56 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network