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Old December 22nd, 2010, 06:51 PM   #1
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On camera mic for Sony HVR Z7U

Which one would you pick for an on-camera mic for Sony HVR Z7U?

1. Rode NTG2
2. Rode NTG3
3. Audio Technica AT897
4. Audio Technica AT4053b

Please assume that I have boom pole, windscreen and Zoom H4N.

Shooting situation 1: Indoor - Wedding, drama with dialogue, cultural programs on stage
Shooting situaiton 2: Outdoor- Dialogue, interviews

Thanks,

Azad
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 10:31 PM   #2
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All of them great mics.
and all of them will suck if mounted to camera away from the voice you're trying to pick up.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 10:56 PM   #3
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Fair enough -:)

Usually do people use a condenser mic or a shot gun mic on camera?
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 04:13 AM   #4
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What is wrong with the stock Z7 mic? it is very good and virtually identical to the AT 875r which is what I now use on all my camera's.

But with all mics you need to be 3-4 feet away to get reasonable pick-up.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 04:27 AM   #5
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What is wrong with the stock Z7 mic? it is very good and virtually identical to the AT 875r which is what I now use on all my camera's.

But with all mics you need to be 3-4 feet away to get reasonable pick-up.
Make that LESS THAN 3-4 feet away. Actually much less. Like 2/3 to 1/2 that distance.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 04:29 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Azadul Haq View Post
...

Shooting situation 1: Indoor - Wedding, drama with dialogue, cultural programs on stage
Shooting situaiton 2: Outdoor- Dialogue, interviews

Thanks,

Azad
Not two but actually five completely different situations with five different sets of needs, NONE of which are adressed properly by an on-camera mic of any sort.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 07:08 AM   #7
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Make that LESS THAN 3-4 feet away. Actually much less. Like 2/3 to 1/2 that distance.
Should have added that was max distances 1-3 feet is better as you say! But I have done drama shoots with the AT875 3-4 feet away but it was quiet locations.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 09:01 AM   #8
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Three to four feet in a VERY quiet location, liike a soundstage. But even then, four feet is pushing the limit. Distance alone can make the sound thin and thready, even if there's no noise to interfere and you can boost the gain to get adquate levels. Distance changes the timbre even when the levels work out fine.
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Last edited by Steve House; December 24th, 2010 at 05:48 AM.
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Old December 23rd, 2010, 08:49 PM   #9
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Although not the best quality production in this video, I believe it is still helpful in showcasing how distance affects sound.

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Old December 24th, 2010, 05:46 AM   #10
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Fair enough -:)

Usually do people use a condenser mic or a shot gun mic on camera?
You need to read up on audio to give yourself some foundation for making your decisions ... your question betrays the fact you lack a lot of fundamental knowledge. To say a mic is a condensor mic refers to the mechanism it uses to turn sound vibrations into electrical energy. To say a mic is a shotgun (one word) mic refers to a specfic type of highly directional mic that uses a long tube lined with ports to achieve a very narrow pattern of maximum sensitivity. There is no "either/or" because virtually all shotgun mics use the condensor mic principle in their transducer ... virtually all commonly used shotguns ARE condensors. On the other hand, mics with other pickup patterns - omni, figure-8, cardioid, hypercardioid - are ALSO often built on condensor-type transducers.

Run, don't walk, to your favourite bookseller and get a copy of Jay Rose's "Producing Great Sound for Film and Video" before spending a penny on anything else.
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Old December 24th, 2010, 09:09 AM   #11
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Well put Steve.
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Old January 13th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Steve House View Post
You need to read up on audio to give yourself some foundation for making your decisions ... your question betrays the fact you lack a lot of fundamental knowledge. To say a mic is a condensor mic refers to the mechanism it uses to turn sound vibrations into electrical energy. To say a mic is a shotgun (one word) mic refers to a specfic type of highly directional mic that uses a long tube lined with ports to achieve a very narrow pattern of maximum sensitivity. There is no "either/or" because virtually all shotgun mics use the condensor mic principle in their transducer ... virtually all commonly used shotguns ARE condensors. On the other hand, mics with other pickup patterns - omni, figure-8, cardioid, hypercardioid - are ALSO often built on condensor-type transducers.

Run, don't walk, to your favourite bookseller and get a copy of Jay Rose's "Producing Great Sound for Film and Video" before spending a penny on anything else.
Thanks for your suggestion Steve. Perhaps I am coming to a forum to like one to avoid reading an entire book -:) Asking questions (even if they are dumb questions), we get to learn only what we need. Perhaps that is not a good way to learn but it does help. It is like going to a buffet and pick only what you like, rather than a sitting in a diner and have a 7 course dinner -:)
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Old January 13th, 2011, 12:11 PM   #13
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Thanks for your suggestion Steve. Perhaps I am coming to a forum to like one to avoid reading an entire book -:) Asking questions (even if they are dumb questions), we get to learn only what we need. Perhaps that is not a good way to learn but it does help. It is like going to a buffet and pick only what you like, rather than a sitting in a diner and have a 7 course dinner -:)
Hi Azadul,

I think what is shown in your post is that you are missing some very fundamental concepts regarding sound and sound equipment. Without this basic knowledge it is going to be very difficult for someone to give you useful information. There is nothing wrong with asking questions and there are no "dumb" questions. The problem with your reasoning that it will allow you to "only learn what" you need, is that at this point it's apparent from your post, that you don't know what you need to know.

If you're looking for one mic to cover all of the situations you've listed you won't find one. It also depends on how good you want the sound to be. For the mics you've listed, right now the Rode NTG3 is a favorite among many. I've used it and it is probably one of the best mics for the money. It also depends on what conditions you'll be using it in. Note, that most shotgun mics are not very good indoors. And, if you are going to shoot weddings, I'd be looking toward lavs on the main people (bride, groom, celebrant) and using the on camera mic to pick up ambient only and for synching.

"Producing Great Sound for Film and Video" is a great book and you should do yourself a favor and get it and read it. Even if you don't read it before you get some answers to your questions you posted here. It's really worth your time.

-Garrett
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Old January 13th, 2011, 12:15 PM   #14
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Garret,

I appreciate the response. I will go buy the book and study it. You are correct I asked a very vague question.
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Old January 13th, 2011, 05:49 PM   #15
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Thanks for your suggestion Steve. Perhaps I am coming to a forum to like one to avoid reading an entire book -:) Asking questions (even if they are dumb questions), we get to learn only what we need. Perhaps that is not a good way to learn but it does help. It is like going to a buffet and pick only what you like, rather than a sitting in a diner and have a 7 course dinner -:)
It's a very poor way to learn IMHO. When you're starting out you don't have any way of knowing what you need to know versus what is nice to know. There is no such thing as learning only what you need because in the long run, sooner or later you're going to need it all.
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