Advice for home recording studio? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 1st, 2012, 10:05 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Upstate NY, USA
Posts: 137
Advice for home recording studio?

Our company is working to put together some eLearning presentations that utilize mostly interactive slides and some video. The slides are narrated and each slide includes a separate audio file which is synced with the animations used to illustrate the topic being discussed.

As we have access to the necessary voice talent, I'd like to set up a separate space in my home office to do the recording. It's a large walkout basement in a very quiet area and among the main audio equipment I currently use for video includes:

* Canon XH-A1 & XA-10 cams
* Rode NTG-3 mic
* Zoom H4n recorder
* Centance MicPort Pro
* Assorted stands, cables, adapters, Sony headset etc.
* Adobe Audition

Wondering what the best approach would be? Perhaps record directly to pc with the MicPort, or perhaps just using the Zoom to capture would be the best route? Any additional items I'm going to wish I had? Not an audio guy by any means but always looking for an excuse to blow some $$$ on new toys. [g]
Tim Ribich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2012, 11:19 PM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,177
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

You could save a step and record directly to your computer using the MicPort. Assuming that is convenient for the process.

While a nice mic, the NTG3 shotgun is probably not an appropriate microphone for this application. There are some microphones that are favorites for voice-over, narration, announcing, etc. Like the Electrovoice RE20 and Shure SM7, etc. Although some people have done well with the lowly SM57/58.

HOWEVER, the performance of the voice talent and the acoustics of the space play MAJOR roles in the final quality. Perhaps even more important than exactly which microphone you use.
Richard Crowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 12:10 AM   #3
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,104
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

I'm doing some voice overs tonight and am using my NT3 inside a box with sound proofing and open to the person reading...recording to a Zoom H4N...
Renton Maclachlan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 01:01 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 463
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

So your pointing the mic facing out..... Toward the background noise?
Idealy the sound absorbing needs to be behind the person. Imagine the mic was a torch... If that was the case where would the beam of light go?
Brian P. Reynolds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 02:38 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Winnipeg Canada
Posts: 532
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ribich View Post
Any additional items I'm going to wish I had? Not an audio guy by any means but always looking for an excuse to blow some $$$ on new toys. [g]
Neumann TLM49 and UA LA610.
MAGIC!!!
Brian David Melnyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 05:25 AM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,104
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian P. Reynolds View Post
So your pointing the mic facing out..... Toward the background noise?
Idealy the sound absorbing needs to be behind the person. Imagine the mic was a torch... If that was the case where would the beam of light go?
You've got to have the mic pointing towards the person doing the voice over...not away from them...so you've got to have one side open!

Harlan Hogan - Voice overs Narrations Commercials Promos

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=vo...w=1557&bih=936

What the box does is stop all the sound from all bar one side...the side where the speaker is. It so happens that behind the speaker in my situation is a pretty sound absorbent wall and I faced my box that way on purpose...

Well I did my recording and it sounds pretty good to me... :-)
Renton Maclachlan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 07:16 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 463
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

If it works for you that's great.... But sometime do more research into acoustics and microphones and you will work it out. But often a heavy blanket hung up behind the VO person delivers impressive results it's all about mic patterns and acoustic reflections.
Brian P. Reynolds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 09:03 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: SLC, UT
Posts: 289
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

I dont think the NTG3 is inappropriate for VO work, maybe not anyones first consideration though. Many years ago I was working with Brian James (rip buddy) and he was looking for a sound with more "punch". We tried about 20 different mics with no satisfaction for him. I pulled out one of my Sennheiser 416's (very similar to NTG3) and after a little experimentation he was very impressed. Being a shotgun you need to be VERY careful about plosives, we found that having the tip about 5-6" away from the mouth but placing the mic slightly off center and approaching from a 45 angle to the side from straight on-so not to be directing the breath down the barrel. SOLD! This went on to become a great sound for him.

Anyhow don't let mic patterns override your own ears when making choices...

And soundproofing...talking into the soundproofing isn't a bad idea depending on the room. this approach keeps the voice from bouncing off of other things and creating unwanted reflected sound. I always treat VO rooms on all sides for a completely neutral sound then i can add whatever flavor i want to it, but that's just me... :-)
__________________
Broadcast Audio Mixer / Owner - www.MambaFiber.com
Greg Bellotte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 09:26 AM   #9
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 1,844
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

As strange as it may be... There are some VO artists that prefer the 416 shotgun mic for VOs and narration and some have their own mic. Of course these are pros with years of experience in proper techniques.... so YMMV.
That said, a LD condenser is usually a good first choice. However it's usually the person speaking more than the gear.
Rick Reineke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 10:58 AM   #10
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,177
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Reineke View Post
As strange as it may be... There are some VO artists that prefer the 416 shotgun mic for VOs and narration and some have their own mic.
Certainly, but that is typically in a rather large, and sound-treated studio, not in small bedroom with reflective walls and ceiling. Kludging a box out of foam will make a shotgun more usable near reflective surfaces,but of course it does nothing for room acoustics. Nothing screams "amateur hour" more than a voice recording with near reflections. A sure-fire way to just sound CHEAP.
Richard Crowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 02:43 PM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Upstate NY, USA
Posts: 137
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Appreciate the input Richard.

We're fortunate to have access to some experienced voice talent in the area. Also given that I have a sufficiently large space in a dead quite (isolated) area of my large basement, I'm confident that we can create a very good, acoustically efficient recording environment.

But I still have much to learn about the tech side of things. From some searches I see that the two mics you referenced seem to be two of the most recommended for this type of work. So far probably leaning toward the Shure SM7 but I've read a number of posts (if it's on the internet it has to be right, correct??) saying that a preamp would be a good way to go with the Shure. Wondering if this is the case and what I might be looking at with respect to choices there?

Finally, I forgot all about a Rode Podcaster with boom arm and shock mount that we have sitting pretty much unused at our main office. How would a mic like that stack up against the Shure & Electrovice?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
You could save a step and record directly to your computer using the MicPort. Assuming that is convenient for the process.

While a nice mic, the NTG3 shotgun is probably not an appropriate microphone for this application. There are some microphones that are favorites for voice-over, narration, announcing, etc. Like the Electrovoice RE20 and Shure SM7, etc. Although some people have done well with the lowly SM57/58.

HOWEVER, the performance of the voice talent and the acoustics of the space play MAJOR roles in the final quality. Perhaps even more important than exactly which microphone you use.
Tim Ribich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 02:47 PM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Upstate NY, USA
Posts: 137
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Hi Brian,

I've read your torcn (flashlight) analogy a few times and still don't quite understand what you're getting at. As a audio novice, what Renton is saying seems to make sense. Would you mind elaborating a bit on your explanation?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian P. Reynolds View Post
So your pointing the mic facing out..... Toward the background noise?
Idealy the sound absorbing needs to be behind the person. Imagine the mic was a torch... If that was the case where would the beam of light go?
Tim Ribich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 03:00 PM   #13
Trustee
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,104
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian P. Reynolds View Post
If it works for you that's great.... But sometime do more research into acoustics and microphones and you will work it out.
Hmmm...well...I've done quite a bit of reading about acoustics etc, and from what I read, I set up the setup I used. I'm a rank amatuer, but I pick the brains of people who aren't. On that score I purchased the NT3 for my studio recording, and as I have it, I used it for my voice overs...

And... if I can get things to about 80+% with what I've got and the little money I spend, I'm not too worried about the remaining 20% I miss...
Renton Maclachlan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 06:04 PM   #14
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sydney.
Posts: 2,569
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ribich View Post
Finally, I forgot all about a Rode Podcaster with boom arm and shock mount that we have sitting pretty much unused at our main office. How would a mic like that stack up against the Shure & Electrovice?
Tim, a 'trick of the trade' we used when new pro voices came to Sydney and were booked in for their first v/o job with us,
was to enquire with their agent whether they could come by the studios in advance to run mic selection checks with them.

We had mic cabinets with 35mics over many years and while we obviously didn't try them all, spending 1/2 an hour in the studio with new talent,
we'd get to hear what they sounded like, they got to choose a mic they liked, they met the our engineers, the girls in the office,
tried our tea or coffee and found our parking lot.

It was great PR, reflected in their first jobs and noted by the happy clients.

Cheers.
__________________
30+ years with our own audio and visual production company and studios.
Allan Black is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2012, 06:20 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Posts: 463
Re: Advice for home recording studio?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Ribich View Post
Hi Brian,

I've read your torcn (flashlight) analogy a few times and still don't quite understand what you're getting at. As a audio novice, what Renton is saying seems to make sense. Would you mind elaborating a bit on your explanation?
Let me try and explain it this way..... imagine you had a camera or 'eyeball' in the microphone facing the same direction as the pick up pattern of the mic and used one of those portable VO booths what direction is the mic facing?... out toward the outside noise, and if you had an air conditioner or any other noise behind that person you would hear it as it entered the mic.

The quite place needs to behind the head of the VO person.
Brian P. Reynolds is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:14 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network