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Old August 20th, 2013, 07:18 PM   #1
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mixer question for DSLR

I am going to do a studio type shoot with a canon 60d. I am not an audio guy, so this is a bit of a jungle for me. I have a really decent Yamaha EMX 312 amplified Mixer. If I can step down the Main output to -12db or -18 db .... will that go into the 60D without distortion or overloading the camera's audio if I turn the pre amp in the camera down to only one click? I am trying to get this done without having to buy a field mixer. Will I need some kind of limiter on the line going into the camera?
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Old August 20th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #2
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Re: mixer question for DSLR

I don't think that's going to be a good mix. You need a mic level out for your camera and I don't think that has one.
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Old August 20th, 2013, 08:43 PM   #3
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Re: mixer question for DSLR

Lets break it down into 4 parts....

Part 1. the mixer would be fine to mix mic signals on... I did a google search on the mixer it seems to have RCA connections as an output, these would be fine to use.

Part 2. the RCA outputs are at 'line level' this is higher than your camera can handle and must be reduced with a pad or some other device to get it to 'mic level' just by winding the gain down on the camera doesn't solve the problem as the preams would be overloaded.

Part 3. Do you have a correctly wired cable to go into the camera, most 'off the shelf' cables are not wired correctly for DSLR inputs and need to be modified.

Part 4. Recording audio onto a DSLR, the quality is normally crap.... bad hiss, poor preamps, and auto gain makes any recorded audio very poor quality.

So YES it can / could be done but you need to come to grips with the above problems to get any sort of usable recording.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 05:17 AM   #4
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Re: mixer question for DSLR

I would do it the old-fashioned way.

Take the line-out from the mixer into a separate recorder.

Use a clapperboard or a clap to get sync. in post.

Use the camera's mic. as a guide track only to help with sync. and not to be used at all.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 08:33 AM   #5
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Re: mixer question for DSLR

I also vote for using an external audio recorder, connected to the line outputs of your mixer. Depending on the model of audio recorder, you may need to use the RCA line outputs since many small audio recorder line inputs can't handle the stronger line level signal of your mixer's main outputs. All of the line outputs of your mixer are unbalanced, so this will actually make it easier to get the correct cables.

Using an external audio recorder will make getting a good audio recording, especially in regards to monitoring the audio while you record, much easier.

In addition to using a clapper to get distinct sync marks at the beginning and end of each take, it is beneficial to get a clean, strong signal into the camera as a guide track that's actually visible on the audio waveform while editing. If you've cut down material from the middle of a 10-minute take, it's much more convenient to have the assurance of a strong guide track to look at and listen to for checking lip sync since the clapper marks are now far removed from the specific part you're working with.

You can get a stronger guide track on the camera by using a mic designed for a dSLR, or you can use an attenuator and the correct cables connected to one of the mixer's available outputs (such as the effects send).

How many mics will you be using and what type of program will you be shooting?
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Old August 24th, 2013, 08:35 AM   #6
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Re: mixer question for DSLR

Hey thanks guys. I suspect that after your feedback I will go with a decent small recorder like a zoom or tascam and sync it up in post. It is very much like the old days. I will dig out my slate with the clacker and get to work. ...... Has anyone used the tascam 60D with success?
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