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Old July 6th, 2015, 12:50 PM   #16
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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Originally Posted by Rick Reineke View Post
A stand would likely suffice for stationary placement for a OMB shooter. A (real) boom-pole is recommended otherwise. My boom pole(s) are used on 99% of shoots I work on. (narrative films, docs, corporate). A boom pole with the C-stand holder could double as a boom stand, but generally not the other way around.
OK, if I was to go the C-stand route, what are the differences between all the C-stands? What do I look for in a c-stand. I search for c-stands on the B&H site and there are so many of them.
What else do I need to get for the c-stand in order t be able to attach the boompole?
Would this work?
BH (Links)
or do I get this kit?
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Old July 6th, 2015, 02:32 PM   #17
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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OK, if I was to go the C-stand route, what are the differences between all the C-stands? What do I look for in a c-stand. I search for c-stands on the B&H site and there are so many of them.
Such a simple question. Too bad the answers will be long.

C-stands have been around a long time. As a result, they've evolved to do a lot of work, from holding light modifiers to holding lights, all the way to holding boom poles for audio. Veritality is the name of the game with c-stands.

There's "normal" c-stands, and "turtle base" c-stands, for example. You can take the base off a turtle base c-stand, which makes it easier to store and transport if you need it to be smaller to do those things. OTOH, you can get "normal" c-stands with "Rocky Moutain legs" that make it easier to set up on uneven ground or even staircases. Depends on what you need.

A "full" c-stand includes a grip arm, usually 40" in length. A grip arm will have a permanently attached grip head on one end. A "full" c-stand will also have a grip head to interface the stand to the grip arm. That is, a grip head that is not permanently attached to the grip arm.

If you have a full c-stand, you put the grip arm on the stand (attach to the baby pin at the top of the risers). Then, pull the grip arm out of the grip head and set it aside. Then insert your boom pole holder into the grip head and tighten it down. Now you can put your boompole in the boompole holder and adjust it as needed.

As to brands, I tend to favor Avenger stands simply because I keep finding them on the used markets when I need one. I don't know why. Matthews makes excellent stands too. As do a number of others. B&H has a house brand (Impact) that's perhaps slightly below the level of the Matthews and Avengers.

Here's what I use for exactly the duty you describe in this thread: An
Avenger A2030DCGKit
, with the Auray boompole holder you already provided a link for. Then, you'll want a sandbag (want to avoid bonking the talent with an expensive mic). That's all you need. I use this combination a lot, works a treat and is fast and easy to set up. These and equivalent c-stands show up on the used markets from time to time. Look around until you find what you want.
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Old July 6th, 2015, 02:55 PM   #18
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
Such a simple question. Too bad the answers will be long.

C-stands have been around a long time. As a result, they've evolved to do a lot of work, from holding light modifiers to holding lights, all the way to holding boom poles for audio. Veritality is the name of the game with c-stands.

There's "normal" c-stands, and "turtle base" c-stands, for example. You can take the base off a turtle base c-stand, which makes it easier to store and transport if you need it to be smaller to do those things. OTOH, you can get "normal" c-stands with "Rocky Moutain legs" that make it easier to set up on uneven ground or even staircases. Depends on what you need.

A "full" c-stand includes a grip arm, usually 40" in length. A grip arm will have a permanently attached grip head on one end. A "full" c-stand will also have a grip head to interface the stand to the grip arm. That is, a grip head that is not permanently attached to the grip arm.

If you have a full c-stand, you put the grip arm on the stand (attach to the baby pin at the top of the risers). Then, pull the grip arm out of the grip head and set it aside. Then insert your boom pole holder into the grip head and tighten it down. Now you can put your boompole in the boompole holder and adjust it as needed.

As to brands, I tend to favor Avenger stands simply because I keep finding them on the used markets when I need one. I don't know why. Matthews makes excellent stands too. As do a number of others. B&H has a house brand (Impact) that's perhaps slightly below the level of the Matthews and Avengers.

Here's what I use for exactly the duty you describe in this thread: An Avenger A2030DCGKit, with the Auray boompole holder you already provided a link for. Then, you'll want a sandbag (want to avoid bonking the talent with an expensive mic). That's all you need. I use this combination a lot, works a treat and is fast and easy to set up. These and equivalent c-stands show up on the used markets from time to time. Look around until you find what you want.
Thanks. The only concern at this point I have is whether 40' arm is going to be long enough. I frequently have wide angle inerview shots so I'm not sure if I will be able to keep it out of frame with such a short arm.
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Old July 6th, 2015, 05:41 PM   #19
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

I saw some at Guitar Center, it was on wheels. I have a studio, so I'm not sure if want it on wheels or if that is something I care about. Thanks for posting the question, it's good for discussion.
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Old July 6th, 2015, 06:19 PM   #20
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

I think you really need to add at least a modest "real" boompole to any stand and holder combination you buy.

Unless it's a very closeup and static shot, you need the extra reach a boompole will give you.

Even if it won't be in the shot, having the mic stand out of the way of the camera operators and lighting stands/instruments is a must and a real boompole in a holder or clamp gives you that reach.
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Old July 6th, 2015, 08:09 PM   #21
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

Kathy, if your work is strictly stationary interviews, a lighting or MI type stand would suffice. If you work with boom op, you need the (real) boom/fish pole and the accessories to convert it to a stand configuration.
> AFAIK, 'C-stand' is/was by Mole-Richardson, but now-a-days synonymous with that type three-curved-legged folding stands. If I'm wrong, someone please correct me... I'm just a dumb soundie.
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Old July 7th, 2015, 08:47 AM   #22
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

OK, thanks everyone. I'm back to being confused, hahahaha!
So a regular light stand will be enough but I'm better off with a C-stand?
I am only doing sit down interviews. I want to add a boom mic to my set up. I'm one person doing it all. I am tiny girl that needs to carry all the equipment from building to building. A versatile stand would be nice in case I needed to use it for something else but then if I use the stand for something else then I can't use it as a mic stand unless I'm not using both at the same time which I think might be a rare occasion. So, for this Friday I have a mic rented with a boom pole (and I will probably just rent a mic with a boompole all the time so I don't need to buy a boompole). I just need to get some kind of stand. I have sand bags. Should I go with a C-stand or regular light stand?
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Old July 7th, 2015, 10:26 AM   #23
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

If you go the lightstand route, I would only recommend a "substantial" lightstand. That will still be considerably smaller and lighter than a C-Stand.

A C-Stand is a very heavy duty piece of equipment. Extremely rugged and an industry standard, but also expensive and harder to transport. I'll put it this way, I don't own a C-Stand despite doing this work as part of a 1 or 2 person team for almost 30 years.

Being in NYC you can also rent a C-Stand if you wanted to, or at least heft one or try putting it in your vehicle if you've only worked with one that was already on the set.

Personally I'm satisfied with what I use: A heavy-duty lightstand, a Bogen SuperClamp, a real boompole with shockmounted mic, a 5-pound shotbag to hang on the short end of the boom achieving perfect balance, and a sandbag on the bottom of the stand.

I've never had a problem, and I have up to 10 feet of height and up to 8 feet of reach.
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Old July 7th, 2015, 10:31 AM   #24
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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Originally Posted by Jay Massengill View Post
If you go the lightstand route, I would only recommend a "substantial" lightstand. That will still be considerably smaller and lighter than a C-Stand.

A C-Stand is a very heavy duty piece of equipment. Extremely rugged and an industry standard, but also expensive and harder to transport. I'll put it this way, I don't own a C-Stand despite doing this work as part of a 1 or 2 person team for almost 30 years.

Being in NYC you can also rent a C-Stand if you wanted to, or at least heft one or try putting it in your vehicle if you've only worked with one that was already on the set.

Personally I'm satisfied with what I use: A heavy-duty lightstand, a Bogen SuperClamp, a real boompole with shockmounted mic, a 5-pound shotbag to hang on the short end of the boom achieving perfect balance, and a sandbag on the bottom of the stand.

I've never had a problem, and I have up to 10 feet of height and up to 8 feet of reach.
Which heavy duty light stand do you use? What do I need to shock mount my mic?
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Old July 7th, 2015, 10:56 AM   #25
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

I don't see the exact one I've had for years and I'm not where I can look at it for a part number until later today. But looking currently at B&H, I think something like a Manfrotto 367B as a minimum would suffice. Plus it's a standard configuration lightstand usable for any lightstand purpose.

The key for safety is the boompole with mic and counterbalance shotbag are resting in the SuperClamp at their exact balance point. The stand is only holding up the weight, it isn't having to counter any off-balance forces trying to pull it over.

If you have to support heavy or off-balance forces, that's when you need a C-Stand and larger sandbags.

If you're renting your boom mic, you should probably rent the shockmount too unless you always rent the exact model of mic and know its diameter and get a shockmount that can accomodate that particular mic.

B&H has many listed and people have chimed in with their favorites on many threads here.
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Old July 7th, 2015, 01:45 PM   #26
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

My 2 cents. Do not buy cheap thinking it is just a stand. Manfrotto and the other name brands are necessary. On cheap stuff there is cheap plastic for locking mechanisms and they fail or break off in your hand when you tighten them.

Also, when I put my boom pole kit together years ago I made a mistake. The pole was set up for an internal XLR cable but the cable did not come with it. I bought the wrong cable. The cable spec on B&H only listed the extended length of the coiled cable. To this day my pole does not collapse all the way. It misses by six inches because of the compressed cable inside it. Not a big deal but it irritates the hell out of me "just because". I have not cut it yet because the factory soldering is better than my work on a cable that takes a beating like that. Make sure your cable works at both lengths of the pole if you are putting a kit together.

Considering your need for light and compact I think the $150.00 Manfrotto stand/boom Rick recommended earlier in this thread is a great place for you to start. 150 bucks, a mic, a sand bag (you have one), and your in. Building a nice stand/pole kit is going to cost a lot more than that and be quite cumbersome and heavy. If you find the Manfrotto set up to be to small for some shoots you will still have it and can always use it in the future for lights and other things.

Steve

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Old July 7th, 2015, 01:48 PM   #27
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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Originally Posted by Kathy Smith View Post
Thanks. The only concern at this point I have is whether 40' arm is going to be long enough. I frequently have wide angle interview shots so I'm not sure if I will be able to keep it out of frame with such a short arm.
You aren't going to be using the grip arm, so it's length doesn't matter. The grip arm is for holding grip equipment for lighting, like flags, cutters, dots, fingers, diffusers, scrims, etc. But when you use your c-stand for audio, you take the grip arm out and set it aside.

All you need from the grip arm assembly is the grip head. You insert the boompole holder in this grip head. Then, you'll need a separate boompole (not a grip arm) to place in the boompole holder.

When I say boompole, I mean something like a
K-Tec boompole.
Get one with the reach you think you'll need for your wide shots. As long as you remember to properly sandbag the c-stand it should be stable through a reasonably wide range of boompole extensions.
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Old July 7th, 2015, 02:39 PM   #28
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

For wide shots you not only need to keep the rig out of the shot, you need to keep the MIC out of the shot. Which brings up proximity issues. You will quickly reach the point of a boomed mic not being a good choice. These are interviews, are lavs not an option? I do a lot of one and two head interviews. I use wired and wireless lavs, often with a boomed Sennheiser shotgun or Rode NT1A (I know, not a good boom mic) as a backup track when I can. In post I decide which track sounds the best. The lavs usually win. On a single head the boomed mic might win because I can get them where they should be.

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Old July 7th, 2015, 03:14 PM   #29
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

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For wide shots you not only need to keep the rig out of the shot, you need to keep the MIC out of the shot. Which brings up proximity issues. You will quickly reach the point of a boomed mic not being a good choice. These are interviews, are lavs not an option? I do a lot of one and two head interviews. I use wired and wireless lavs, often with a boomed Sennheiser shotgun or Rode NT1A (I know, not a good boom mic) as a backup track when I can. In post I decide which track sounds the best. The lavs usually win. On a single head the boomed mic might win because I can get them where they should be.

Steve
I'm already using a lav. I'd like to add a boom mic for two reasons, one as a backup, two so I can mix the two mics to have a better quality sound overall.
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Old July 7th, 2015, 03:27 PM   #30
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Re: Boom stand and boompole

My stand is a Manfrotto 3365, which seems to be discontinued.
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