Acoustic treatment for a room at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 12th, 2018, 02:41 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 27
Acoustic treatment for a room

I'm building out a small studio in a room that is about 11 feet by 11 feet, with a roughly 7'8" ceiling and wooden floors. It is all drywall and currently very echoey. I know the echo will go down once I have the equipment in the room, but I do want to deaden it as much as possible. Because it will be filmed as well as recorded, I can't build a small booth or do things that will create a small room within the room.

The simplest solution seems to be to buy acoustic foam paneling and cover the walls and ceiling with it. My questions are:

1. If I want it as dead as possible, do I just cover the full walls and ceiling with acoustic foam, or are there reasons to only cover PART of the walls/ceiling, or not the ceiling at all, etc.

2. I know that the "specs" on 1" and 2" foam describe different frequencies that the thicker foam cuts, but in thinking about making the room as dead as possible, do I just want to go with the 2" foam over 1", or are there reasons to do 1"?

3. Last time I used acoustic foam, I got a spray on adhesive that claims not to damage paint, but it badly damaged the paint when I removed the foam. Is there now an actual adhesive that won't damage the paint?
David Pakman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2018, 02:51 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 872
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

There are quite a few DIY soundproofing videos on YouTube, and I suggest you start there. As for my own experience controlling the reverb in a very 'lively' room, the acoustic foam (even the expensive treated variety), is not very effective. With sound waves, you need to convert and disperse their energy in order to reduce them, that is done best with thicker/denser material, like rockwool. In addition, the angles of the walls play a big role in the level of echo and reverb. You can't change that much without building a room within a room, but large diffusion panels filled with rockwool worked nicely on my own build. Adding a cork floor, and/or thick carpet will also help. Beyond that, it's going to be very difficult to get rid of that last 20% that will give you a reasonably 'dead' room.
Oren Arieli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2018, 02:53 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 27
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

That makes sense, I'm going to check out some videos. Am I understand correctly that if I put down a thick carpet and cover the walls and ceiling with acoustic foam, it might get me 80% of the way there? I'm wondering if maybe that with a good voice processor could be a good enough solution.
David Pakman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2018, 04:58 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 2,349
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

If you're doing this for voice work then it's always worth looking at a portabooth.

Andrew
Andrew Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2018, 08:54 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 859
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

Acoustic Panels | Bass Traps | Sound Diffusers | GIK Acoustics

Very reasonable and better than foam.
Jim Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 09:30 AM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 1,879
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

Partial or wall-to-wall carpeting would may a huge difference to start. Then add panels and/or maybe bass traps if needed. Window drapes and plush furniture help as well.
Rick Reineke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 07:51 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 257
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

Sound blankets are the usual approach to treat a room on set during a shoot. But if you've got a permanent set up then this general approach is still a good cheap way to go about it, but you can do it more permanently.



__________________
http://IronFilm.co.nz/Sound/ (Location Sound Recordist based in New Zealand)
http://www.YouTube.com/c/SoundSpeeding
David Peterson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 08:20 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 872
Re: Acoustic treatment for a room

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Pakman View Post
That makes sense, I'm going to check out some videos. Am I understand correctly that if I put down a thick carpet and cover the walls and ceiling with acoustic foam, it might get me 80% of the way there? I'm wondering if maybe that with a good voice processor could be a good enough solution.
I can't give you a number, since there are way too many variables we haven't discussed. I'm not an audio engineer, but I can pretty much promise you that you won't get 80% reduction of echo through foam and carpet alone. It will likely sound better than what you have, but that is because you're dispersing the reverbations (but not absorbing them well enough).
Oren Arieli is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Adorama
(800) 223-2500
New York, NY

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Texas Media Systems
(512) 440-1400
Austin, TX

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

VideoGuys
(800) 323-2325
Mineola, NY

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:55 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2018 The Digital Video Information Network