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Old November 8th, 2005, 11:42 PM   #1
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Miking and recording electric drum demo session

I am going to be miking a Yamaha electric drum kit for a demonstration event within the next few weeks. Since it is electric (specific model yet unknown but I will post it when I know) I will be miking the speakers not the drums. I have an AKG 414 B-XL, and a Rode NT1a. I have seen the 414 used for miking pianos, but I am unsure it is appropriate for drums. Please chime in on the usefulness of either of these mics. This event will be filmed with a vx2000 (also using on camera sound with a Senn Mickie, and possibly a Beyer dynamic when the drummer is speaking to the audience.) I will run the audio into a PMD671 from Marantz (for the drum) and the Beyer may also go into the Marantz or into an M-Audio micro-track. Again please chime in on the appropriateness of the setup (should I be using other mics, or is what I have appropriate for a recording to be used as a professional demo). I could record the sound to computer but that requires greater setup, so thus far I have opted not to go that route (but I could be convinced otherwise).

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Old November 9th, 2005, 06:16 AM   #2
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If the drum brain has a spare output you might want to use a direct box. If it does not they may let you use a direct box with a through port.

Sam
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Old November 9th, 2005, 02:38 PM   #3
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Yes, a direct out from the mixer or drum brain will get you the best sound. If that's not possible, I would go with the 414 in front of the speaker.
If you do go the computer way, try and get the direct out and a room/ambiance track to mix together. That way you get the crispness of the direct out with the reverb of the room and crowd response.
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Old November 9th, 2005, 11:31 PM   #4
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Generally I like to get separate room ambience to mix later. But I do need to remember to record ambience for later noise reduction (which always creeps in)
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