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Old March 27th, 2007, 12:53 PM   #76
 
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another benefit to a standard is that when everyone uses the standard, we're all referencing the same thing. So, when you've got mixed cans on the set, in the studio, etc, it's harder to make sense when someone says "I need more punch" and the guy wearing a different set of cans says "Bottom end is already killing me..."
As has been posted here many times...7506 is not the best headphone out there, by far not the worst, but it's a reference point from which we can all have a cogent conversation.
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Old January 11th, 2009, 01:16 PM   #77
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studio monitors not headphones

What speakers would you recommend for mixing sound in FCP at the computer?
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Old January 11th, 2009, 02:12 PM   #78
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How much money?

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Old January 11th, 2009, 02:27 PM   #79
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Also how big is your room? Installations vary widely
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Old January 11th, 2009, 03:45 PM   #80
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And are you talking about basic dialog editing or doing a full-fledged sound design and music mix?
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Old January 12th, 2009, 03:59 PM   #81
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For editing video productions with FCP

Room is 14x17 or so.

Something better than my mac built-in speakers with an eye towards the future as I learn more about sound mixing.

Not sure of budget at this point.

Dialogue editing with music tracks.
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Old January 12th, 2009, 05:01 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by Larry Vaughn View Post
Room is 14x17 or so.

Something better than my mac built-in speakers with an eye towards the future as I learn more about sound mixing.

Not sure of budget at this point.

Dialogue editing with music tracks.
It's hard to say because there's such a wide variety on the market at various price points. Be prepared for some sticker-shock though. If you're serious about editing, mixing, and mastering, a conventional set of "multimedia speakers" or gee-whiz-bang hard-core gamer's speakers aren't going to cut it. Even popular "audiophile" speakers really aren't very good choices. What you're looking for is a set of speakers that accurately reproduce what you're sending them - if your mix is good they should show it and if it's bad they should sound terrible. You're going to be hard-pressed to find a pair of real studio monitors offering any degree of accuracy for less than $500 a pair and with the exception of a few hidden treasures $1000 a pair is about right for the starting point for the real-deal. The sky's the limit from there. Well respected brands include (in no particular order) Genelec, Dyn-Audio, ADAM, KRK, Mackie, m-Audio, Klein & Hummel, JBL Pro, Blue Sky, Event, and a number of others. One maker with an entry level system that is surprsingly good at a very good price is Yorkville Sound, not very well known but worth checking out if your budget is limited.

I'd suggest starting by looking at the nature of the project's you're doing - mixing for theatrical releases are going to be a lot more demanding than mixing for web delivery or YouTube - and thinking realistically about how much you're able to invest, both in the monitors themselves and for the acoustic conditioning of the space where you'll be using them. The speakers interact with the room and you have to look at BOTH parts of the system in a holistic manner.
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Old January 13th, 2009, 10:27 AM   #83
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I like the KRK Rokit speakers:
KRK Systems - Monitors, subwoofers, speakers, monitoring applications, room perfect technology

They are not expensive, look nice and are very popular, and they are quite good -- remembering you can pay several thousand dollars a piece for studio monitors.

The Rokits cost:
5" $150 each
6" $200 each
8" $250 each

You can go to a Guitar Center and see and hear them, along with other speakers. Take a CD of material you know, the type you will be using the speakers for.

These speakers are bigger and heavier than you would expect if you are used to computer speakers.

There are many options, but the KRK Rokits are a popular, practical and good quality flat response monitor for home NLE systems and even home DAWs.

The Rokits have a variety of input types (RCA, balanced and unbalanced 1/4", XLR) and input controls which are very helpful for adapting to different situations.

There is a 10" KRK woofer available if you want to add it now or later:
KRK Systems - Monitors, subwoofers, speakers, monitoring applications, room perfect technology
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Old January 13th, 2009, 12:31 PM   #84
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My cans are the Sennheiser HD 570 (HD570) - I find they're very good, but I wonder if I should swap them out for Sony MDR-7506 - Is it worth swapping over to the Sony's?

Chris
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Old January 13th, 2009, 01:15 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by Christopher Warwick View Post
My cans are the Sennheiser HD 570 (HD570) - I find they're very good, but I wonder if I should swap them out for Sony MDR-7506 - Is it worth swapping over to the Sony's?

Chris
Everyone's ears are different. I'd take a sample of the type of audio you typically work with to a good music shop and 'test drive' different cans. That's what I did and to my ears, and for the audio I work with, I picked the Sennheiser HD 280's over the 7506's.


-A
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Old January 13th, 2009, 03:00 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher Warwick View Post
My cans are the Sennheiser HD 570 (HD570) - I find they're very good, but I wonder if I should swap them out for Sony MDR-7506 - Is it worth swapping over to the Sony's?

Chris
Depends on what you're doing with them. Phones for monitoring as you record in the field ... absolutely! (And while the 7506 is possibly the most common I'm sure your's are fine.) Phones for evaluating takes and rough cutting dialog, sure. But never, ever, for sound design and mixing. You simply have to do the final mix on proper speakers at calibrated levels.
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Old January 15th, 2009, 07:48 AM   #87
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I'm just waiting for the Sennheiser HD 800 to hit the shops. I'm first in line.

First Review HERE.
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Old January 22nd, 2009, 12:17 AM   #88
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Answer to the original question (many pages ago!) Sennheiser HD280 for $199 or Sony 7506 for $228 from Turramurra music.

Me, I like Sennheisers but I'm going Sony for my recording job simply because they're the standard, as someone said.

It IS worth the money getting good sound.
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Old January 22nd, 2009, 08:01 AM   #89
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Answer to the original question (many pages ago!) Sennheiser HD280 ..... <snip>
Actually - for camera use the industry standard (in the UK at least) are the Sennheiser HD 25-1 (now in Mk.II version) they were specifically designed to do the job the OP requested.
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Old January 22nd, 2009, 11:31 AM   #90
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I own the Senn HD 280 Pros and find them to be very flat and neutral. If you're doing a rough mix, or checking a mix, you can do much worse. (And, yes, for a critical mix, use monitors, not headphones for more reasons than I care to discuss.)

The 7506s are scooped. (The highs and lows are artificially boosted - especially the highs.) This is bad for accurate monitoring, but good when on the set - they help cut through the ambient sound.

The 7506s sound artificially "sweet" to my ears. They're great for live recording. They're widely accepted. But they're not neutral by a long shot.

I've also auditioned the AKG 240 cans. To my ears, these sound dead. As Goldilocks would say, the Sonys are too hot, the AKGs are too cold, and the Senn 280s are just right. ;)

The best way to buy is to go to a store, audition the cans side-by-side, and then reward that store with your purchase.
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