A good high end portable digital mixer at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 1st, 2006, 11:33 AM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7
A good high end portable digital mixer

I have been using a Shure FP33 mixer in the field, but am now able to upgrade and would like to get a digital mixer with limiter, compressor and digital lvl readout. Budget is not a problem but would like a good mixer with good sound quality. What does anyone recommend?




_______________________________________________________
"Without sound everyone goes def."
Sean Freeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 11:42 AM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Edison, NJ
Posts: 119
On B&H I saw the Sony DMXP01

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...goryNavigation
Ray Sigmond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 12:00 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
Sound Devices gets great reviews. Check out the 442 and the 302
http://www.sounddevices.com/products/442master.htm
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 01:17 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Augusta Georgia
Posts: 5,413
I highly recommend the Sound Devices 302 or 442.

However, these are analog mixers, but they do have limiters and other features.

The sound level is presented via a very effective arrangement of LEDs.
__________________
Dan Keaton
Augusta Georgia
Dan Keaton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 03:07 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Just a note - compression and similar processing is generally best applied in the final stages of post, not when making the original recording in the field.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2006, 03:22 PM   #6
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
To a very limited extent, I have to disagree with Steve. If you find yourself unable to control the sound in the field, and hardware devices help gain that control, then go ahead and commit to the processed sound in the field. It also might be that hardware helps deal with certain issues such as compression, feedback, etc. In those cases, and being sure you know your content...go ahead and committ. But if you have no control, don't have time to check everything 3 times, and don't know the subject...be as cautious as possible, and apply in post.
Real world scenario;
you have a speaker that talks very loudly, and very softly, at both ends of the spectrum. Because of the loud voice, you've got to keep gain artificially low. (-18dB or more) In post, you attempt to bring up the quiet passages, but because of the gain and signal to noise, you've now raised the noise level significantly, whereas if you'd recorded with light compression in the field, you could have greater gain and potentially more efficient s/n ratio, and therefore better audio to work with in post.
But overall, my experience for "average" or "common" recording scenarios is to do all your EQ, compression, and sometimes even room tone, in post.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2006, 01:45 PM   #7
Supports LPFM Radio
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Northern California USA
Posts: 127
You don't need a digital mixer. Note that the Sony digital field mixer (the DMX P01) has been discontinued (or so I was told by some Sony folks). And as others here have pointed out, you don't need (or even want) compression on a field mixer. But a limiter is handy...as are good meters, and so on.

I own a Sound Devices 302 and like it a lot. I also have an older PSC M4 A+ that works OK (and a small Sound Devices MixPre that I also like). But I'm most happy with the 302.

There are other good mixers, but as a FP33 replacement, the 302 is a pretty close fit.

Best,

Jim
Jim Feeley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2006, 03:59 PM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve House
Just a note - compression and similar processing is generally best applied in the final stages of post, not when making the original recording in the field.
Were it not for the input and output limiters in the Sound Devices 442, I wouldn't have bought it. I count on them to be inaudible and to save my butt on a regular basis.

It's an analog mixer. I can feed two (well, three actually) cameras simultaneously, if needed.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2006, 05:45 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty Ford
Were it not for the input and output limiters in the Sound Devices 442, I wouldn't have bought it. I count on them to be inaudible and to save my butt on a regular basis.

It's an analog mixer. I can feed two (well, three actually) cameras simultaneously, if needed.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Oh yes, the role of limiters is a given - when I was referring to "processing" I meant things like compression or other manipulations of the signal.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2006, 06:33 AM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
Ah, well some folks consider limiting processing. There is also the question of delay. That's normally considered a process, but the Sound Devices 744T allows delay to be adjusted separately for each channel to allow for source to mic distance differences. I don't think I've been in a position to use that feature yet.

Other location audio guys use one of the Yamaha digital mixers, I think because of all of it's input and output capabilities. Those are on carts and run on AC, typically not on batteries.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:58 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network