Radio interference at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 26th, 2006, 02:38 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Woodhaven Mi
Posts: 102
Radio interference

I am having some problems with radio interference when recording on my Korg D3200 mixer. I have good mics, new XLR cables and am plugging into grounded outlets. It is a local AM radio station that has the transmitter about 2 miles away. I have also had problems at another location much further away (probably another station). It seems to be related to the XLR cables. I plugged a Sony ECM 44b lav directly in to the mixer and did not have any radio pickup at all. I thought that XLR cables were shielded to prevent this problem. Is there anything that I can do about this? I cannot afford to have problems in the field.

Regards,
Jerry
Jerry Jesion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2006, 06:22 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kilgore, TX
Posts: 45
Jerry,
Neutrik EMC Series connectors may help.

There are some good papers on RF problems and dealing with them on Jim Browns site. http://www.audiosystemsgroup.com/
Look at the papers on pin 1 problems and understanding RF interference.


Sam Gates
Sam Gates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2006, 10:35 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 3,259
So-called "quad" xlr cables may help. They resist RF somewhat better than a standard cable.

Most of the major manufacturers have them, they have 4 conductors (plus shield), in two twisted pairs that are then twisted around each other. Then each pair goes to a pin. This is a lousy explanation, you'd find more info at http://canare.com/files/Cat11_p35.pdf.
Seth Bloombaum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2006, 12:23 AM   #4
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seth Bloombaum
So-called "quad" xlr cables may help. They resist RF somewhat better than a standard cable.

Most of the major manufacturers have them, they have 4 conductors (plus shield), in two twisted pairs that are then twisted around each other. Then each pair goes to a pin. This is a lousy explanation, you'd find more info at http://canare.com/files/Cat11_p35.pdf.
If you go the Quad route, be aware that they wear out much faster than other cables, due to the fine/thin strands. I thought I was losing my mind a few years back when having problems with a couple cables. Fred Ginsberg took out a knife and showed me where the problem lay. Coiling/uncoiling the quads will cause early failure. But they are better in bad RF situations, supposedly.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:05 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network