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Old May 20th, 2006, 06:10 PM   #1
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To camera or external recorder?

I will use the following set-up for a number of different shoots:
2 wireless lavs (senn 100 g2)
1 shotgun (hope senn 416, maybe rode or audio-technica)


These 3 xlr inputs exceed my jvc hd100's 2 inputs, so my question is - should I use some kind of mixer that combines these down to 2 channels for direct recording to tape, or use a seperate recording device?
Or would a Y-cable work to combine the two g2's into one channel?
I would really appreciate specific recommendations of devices, espec. under $800.

Last edited by James Daniels; May 21st, 2006 at 04:08 AM.
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Old May 21st, 2006, 02:25 PM   #2
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A convenient, relatively inexpensive solution is to get a Beachtek XLR adapter that mounts to the bottom of your camera (www.beachtek.com). There are several models ranging from about $160 to $380 depending on whether you want phantom power, preamps and limiters. Any one of them can take two XLR inputs and combine them to one. Most of them use a miniplug output connector, but you can adapt it back to XLR with this:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 04:32 PM   #3
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I'd tend to say to use a separate recording device.

What happens if the balance isn't set right between the two inputs you are combining? What happens if one feed ends up sounding like garbage? Good planning and adjustment go a long way towards this, but it is an issue to consider.

When necessary, I take my PC to location. I have the EMU-1820m for my inputs and outputs. It offers reasonable flexibility, good sound quality, a reasonable price, and the ability to record numerous channels. However, I'm using the system more and more for editing and rendering, so I'm going to look elsewhere for recording soon.

I'll let the alternate device suggestions for others who are more knowledgeable.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 05:02 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale Mellinger
I'd tend to say to use a separate recording device.
I'll second that. As long as you have the time and resources to do the mix in post (and this is a key determining factor) it's always better to have multiple tracks to work with. If synching is not an issue, consider a small digital recorder. I personally use a M-Audio MicroTrack 24/96 for both wild audio recording and when I need additional tracks, it can be used with balanced or unbalanced sources and I'm very happy with it, except for two minor issues: the counter numbers on the display are small, and there is no limiter built in.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 05:25 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Retread
Beachtek XLR adapter [...] Any one of them can take two XLR inputs and combine them to one. Most of them use a miniplug output connector, but you can adapt it back to XLR [...]
I'm curious, doesn't it create an impedance mis-match when you run the 1/8" output of the Beachtek into a professional XLR micropone input? This would create slight degradation of the audio signal.

If you want to passively mix two XLR microphone lines into one, consider using something like the JIB/C, a little $40(US) box that sums the input of two mics. You will get a 10dB loss when you sum the two channels, so it's recommended that you use it with mics that are recording the same source. BTW, this little box also lets phantom power get through to both mics if available from the input upstream. For most situations, you'll be happier with the results if you use an active mixer, on the other hand, this little box is cheaper than a mixer, and even when using a mixer you find youself needing to sum two mics once in a while.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 06:24 PM   #6
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Thanks

Thank you for the input.
I think I will go with a 2 -> 1 mixer for casual/rehearsal shooting and rent an edirol r-4 or somesuch for full production days.
Anyone heard of the TecNec IM-1? Markertek sells it.
(btw picked-up a used 416T - so getting the T-power adapter - hoping it's as consistent as the 48v phantom version).
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 07:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tames
I'm curious, doesn't it create an impedance mis-match when you run the 1/8" output of the Beachtek into a professional XLR micropone input?
Not really. The HD100 XLR input has an impedance of 3000 ohms, not terribly different from run-of-the-mill 1/8" camcorder inputs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tames
This would create slight degradation of the audio signal.
If there were a significant mismatch (again, there wouldn't be), it would create a slight "attenuation" of the audio signal, but it would still be well within the range of the input. I'm afraid that the word "degradation" might incorrectly imply to some readers that the signal would be distorted.

The box you mention is a nice little item, though, and more cost effective for the use under discussion with a cam that already has XLR inputs.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 08:07 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Daniels
Anyone heard of the TecNec IM-1?
While the TecNec IM-1 costs three times as much as the little JIB/C box I suggested earlier, it does offer you the advantage of a mix knob allowing you to choose the blend between the two inputs.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 08:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Retread
The HD100 XLR input has an impedance of 3000 ohms, not terribly different from run-of-the-mill 1/8" camcorder inputs.
Ah, that's good to know, thanks for the clarification!
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