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Old June 9th, 2006, 07:41 PM   #1
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Audio Question from a Newbee

Hello All,

I have a question regarding my audio setup on my Sony HDR-HC1 camcorder.

I am new to all this so any help is appreciated.


My audio setup includes:

*Beachtek DXA-2s
*Rode VideoMic
*Wired Lavalier mic (XLR)

I have the Rode VideoMic connected to the mini-jack on the DXA-2s to the right channel and the lavalier mic connected to the left channel via XLR input.

My question is:

When I am doing an interview (walking or stationary) is it best to record the 2 sources seperately in Stereo or combined in Mono?

Obviously in stereo I hear each one in their respective sides (R or L).

I like the Stereo setting better for clarity. It seems that I can hear the interviewee a bit better but don't like the seperation (VideoMic in the Right channel & lavalier mic in the Left)

My other question is:

When I edit my interview in post, can I make each of the audio sources MONO so that they don't come out of the speakers seperated into individual channels. I would like to combine them so that they sound in both speakers each.

I am not sure if I am explaining it correctly but hope some of you understand what I am trying to ask.

I am on a VERY tight budget so getting a mixer is NOT an option!

I have to make what I have work!

Thanks in advance.


BTW: I am using Adobe Premiere Pro for my NLE.
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Old June 9th, 2006, 07:48 PM   #2
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You've answered your own question. Its whatever sounds best and gives you easiest shot at editing the audio. Having the separate tracks available to combine later seems to be the way to go, IMHO.
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Old June 10th, 2006, 07:24 AM   #3
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I'll echo Chris ... record on set in stereo but consider them to be two parallel mono tracks (which is what they really are anyway given your mic arrangement). In post in your editor, convert the "stereo" track into two separate mono tracks, one from each channel, and pan each one to the centre in the final edit mix. You didn't mention what NLE you use but that's something that can be done in most. Even the freeware editor Audacity has a "split track" tool that will split out the left and right channels of a stereo track into two separate mono channels with just a single mouseclick. And many editors have a mono mixdown tool that will do the same thing without having to split the original.
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Old June 10th, 2006, 08:49 AM   #4
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Recording the two tracks in stereo allows for easier level control and isolates any problem that might occur in one channel from the other.

Your plan is a good one for redundancy, but I think you'll find that you want to use only one of the tracks. The time delay between the lapel and your camera position will give a subtle echo effect, and the unequal addition and subtraction of waves of different frequencies may give noticeable coloration of the sound.
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Old June 10th, 2006, 01:18 PM   #5
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Steve,
I kinda thought that but wasn't sure.
Thanks


Thanks for all your help so far.


Good suggestion also FRED.


Thanks
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Old June 10th, 2006, 05:34 PM   #6
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I should add that when you record the tracks separately in stereo, you have the option to shift one in post to get rid of any echo. At interview distances the echo may not be perceptable anyway. Once that's done, the mixture of the two mics may give a richness that more than compensates for the wave interference I mentioned above. In other words, I've now said two opposite things, so I'm bound to be right 8>)
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