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Old September 19th, 2006, 02:13 PM   #1
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What's a good mic for animation voice?

Can anyone recommend a good mic for recording actor's voices for animated small screen productions?

I'm thinking mono, $100 - $200.

Thanks.
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Old September 19th, 2006, 03:35 PM   #2
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I recommend Röde NT3 as an allround performer.
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Old September 19th, 2006, 05:42 PM   #3
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I'd recommend a large capsule condenser for voice recording in a studio setting. In that price range, look at the Rode NT1-A. And use a pop filter.

One thing about large diaphrams: they can be sensitive, picking up room echo, noise and the like. At a minimum, you can hang blankets and add clutter to a normal room to help things out.

If your room is junk, another solution is to use a dynamic mic, like a Shure SM-58. You can get right on top of the thing and keep the room sounds low.

Believe it or not, Bono has been known to make studio recordings for U2 with an SM-58 and no headphones! He just stands in front of the monitors and wails. The bleed is low enough that it doesn't overly contaminate the mix.

Small condensers, like the NT3, are indeed flexible. They make good instrument mics, drum overheads and can be used well at a distance (like for indoor video recording). But for up-close, studio dialog and vocals, a large condenser is the most common choice.
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Old September 21st, 2006, 05:41 AM   #4
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Stretch to 300 bucks and get the Shure Sm7...this mic is in almost every studio in the world...it's very versatile and you won't be trading up on it...it's something you'll keep in your arsenal forever...

There's a lot of Rode love on these forums...they are good for the money...but this is a fantastic mic for the money and you'll have it and use it for years...loads of folks use it on radio and tons of studios that do professional VO stuff use this mic...

It does tend to be better for males voices in some folks opinions (though there are some good female jazz recordings done with this as well) so if you're doing cartoony (girl voiced) stuff maybe there's better out there...but the chick on Howard Stern uses this...as does Anthony K from RHCP, and Michael Jackson did on Thriller...as well as many, many more...

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Old September 21st, 2006, 02:08 PM   #5
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Thanks everyone.
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Old September 21st, 2006, 05:08 PM   #6
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Another well respected mic for VO and radio is the EV RE20

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Old September 22nd, 2006, 01:39 PM   #7
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The AT2020 is only about $100 and sounds very good. There's an audio sample on Ty Ford's site.
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Old September 22nd, 2006, 02:20 PM   #8
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every voice is unique and so is every mic, but for general use, and RE20 or Sennheiser 421 are good choices in the dynamic arena, I have also been hearing good things about the Heil PR-40.

I use a Rode NT2, and have also had good success with a Shure SM58. Another consideration is recording space, how quiet is it, etc.... some large diaphragm condensors will pick up the sound of your toenails growing.
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Old September 23rd, 2006, 01:50 AM   #9
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easy to use

For a really easy to use mic, get the samson usb mic. I've tried it, works wonders, just plug in the usb and start talking. Nothing could be simpler. No need to worry about mic pres, phantom powers, etc. Good for an animator, you should be concentrating on the animation, not the in an outs of audio engineering.
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Old September 23rd, 2006, 05:24 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patomakarn Nitanontawat
For a really easy to use mic, get the samson usb mic. I've tried it, works wonders, just plug in the usb and start talking. Nothing could be simpler. No need to worry about mic pres, phantom powers, etc. Good for an animator, you should be concentrating on the animation, not the in an outs of audio engineering.
You can have simplicity and you can have high quailty. Never count on being able to have both at once. I'd have to strongly disagree with you statement that you shouldn't be concrentrating on the audio - sound design and vocal characterization are crucial for creating believablility in animation, IMHO, even more so than in live dramatic action. Graham himself might not need to be the one to concentrate on getting the best possible quality audio but someone on the production team needs to be focussed on it.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 01:02 AM   #11
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I agree with Steve. Look at South Park. The animation is lame. It's the audio that makes it expressive.

That said, for all I know the Samson mic would sound perfect. It's best to find a store where you can audition some mics and reward their help with a sale.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 05:58 PM   #12
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I went with the AT2020.

Thanks for the great response to my question everyone!
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Old September 26th, 2006, 05:43 AM   #13
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Not a bad choice!

Did you see my video?

I also have a video of the Rode SVM.

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Old September 26th, 2006, 06:06 AM   #14
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Can you post a direct link to the video, Ty.

I couldn't find it on your site.

Thanks.
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Old September 26th, 2006, 06:45 AM   #15
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No I can't. My site structure (Thanks Comcast) is problematic.

It's in the top level of my online archive.

TyFordRodeSVM.mov

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