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Old October 24th, 2006, 01:12 PM   #1
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Which wireless frequency, does it really matter?

I'm looking at getting the Sennheiser Evolution G2 100 Lav system and noticed that this system comes in different frequencies. They are grouped in 518MHZ-554MHz or 626MHz-662MHz or 740MHz-776MHz; is there any advantage to one of these groupings?

I know red is postive and black is ground.
That is the extent of my electronics knowledge so any insight would be helpful.

Cheers,
D
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Old October 24th, 2006, 02:14 PM   #2
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Have a look at this thread:
http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?t=73755

Or, search this forum for "wireless frequency", and you should find the information you are looking for.

Good luck!

- Martin
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Old October 24th, 2006, 03:27 PM   #3
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Martin,

That's info I was looking for.

Thank You!


Do I have to go to the back of the classroom cause I didn't use the search function right away? ;)

Cheers,
D
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Old October 24th, 2006, 04:30 PM   #4
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Dear David,



For audio, Red is for Positive, Black is for Ground.


In the United States:

For house wiring: Green is for Ground, White is Neutral, and Black is Hot!

I thought you might like to know, in case you ever work on house wiring.

I was amazed when I learned that Black was Hot after my long time experience with black being ground for audio!
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Old October 24th, 2006, 05:01 PM   #5
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Check out the Sennheiser Frequency Finder to determine the best frequency for your primary area

http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite...qfinder-ew.asp

There are three sets of blue, representing the three Frequency Groups A, B and C

Generally you would choose the group that has the most, free space

Example:
In BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA you would chouse Group C as it is completely free. However A or B will also work since there are still plenty empty spots.

http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite...OUISIANAew.PDF
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Old October 24th, 2006, 06:05 PM   #6
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I live near Salt Lake and find PLENTY of usuable frequecies in both the A and B groups. I have several sets of mics in B, and two sets of IEM in A. They travel almost every week and reguardless of city I always manage to find plenty of open freqs in both groups.

Sorry, no experience with the C group.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 06:20 PM   #7
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I was on a rooftop in Hollywood and A and B were both locked up. i ended up using a CH with a weak signal. I have never seen that before!
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Old October 25th, 2006, 11:58 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Davidson
I was on a rooftop in Hollywood and A and B were both locked up. i ended up using a CH with a weak signal. I have never seen that before!
1440 Frequencies were locked up?
Did you perform an Auto Scan? If zero channels appearted free in 1 Bank, there are 7 more to Auto Scan. Just switch to Bank 2 then Auto Scan again.
There's also a quick video if you need to reference how to Auto Scan over at http://dvestore.com/dvgeartalk.html Click on "Sennheiser G2 Wireless Tutorial"

Hope this helps,
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Old October 28th, 2006, 01:32 AM   #9
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I was using a Shure system that operates from 692-716 and 782-808 Mhz. Each receiver only has 100 channels and no scan feature.
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