Old vinyl recordings at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 9th, 2006, 06:11 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Posts: 86
Old vinyl recordings

Hi all

I've been tasked with the recording of a song and it needs to be mixed in such a way that it will sound like an old vinyl recording from the 40s.

While I'm aware that the musical arrangement, instrumentation, vocal style and lyrics must first be able to reflect the era, how do I approach the mixdown to achieve the sound of an old vinyl?

Any advice is appreciated.
Zulkifli Yusof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 06:49 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
Gosh, I don't know. "Old Vinyl"... well that would be MONO, not stereo, and the dynamic range wouldn't be what we expect... so roll off the bass, and maybe crank up the high end a bit... give it that 'tinny' sound. Beyond that, I don't think you WANT to induce 'scratches' and popping, but I could be wrong. Some people thing OLD film means scratches and hair in the gate... so who knows?
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 08:01 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Singapore
Posts: 86
Yea, you're right about it being mono instead of stereo. I'll make a note about dynamic range and rolling off the bass sounds. How do I "degrade" the quality of the recording though? Introduction of noise maybe (like scratches and hair on old films)?
Zulkifli Yusof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 09:31 AM   #4
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zulkifli Yusof
Yea, you're right about it being mono instead of stereo. I'll make a note about dynamic range and rolling off the bass sounds. How do I "degrade" the quality of the recording though? Introduction of noise maybe (like scratches and hair on old films)?
If your audio editor supports plug-ins (most do), look into the plug-in called Vinyl from Izotope. It has several presets for recordings made in different eras.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 09:32 AM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
Wow Greg, good to know that. Thanks for the tip.
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 09:56 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 253
Yeah...I second the Vinyl plug-in. I have used it on loops before with great success. It has settings for different types of records such as 33 1/3rds etc.

Jon Bufkin
http://www.jonbufkin.com
Jonathan Bufkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 10:18 AM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
I've been googling for it, and can't seem to locate it. ANy links?
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 11:13 AM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Alvarez
I've been googling for it, and can't seem to locate it. ANy links?
http://www.izotope.com/products/audio/vinyl/

And the best part, it's free!
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 11:18 AM   #9
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zulkifli Yusof
Yea, you're right about it being mono instead of stereo. I'll make a note about dynamic range and rolling off the bass sounds. How do I "degrade" the quality of the recording though? Introduction of noise maybe (like scratches and hair on old films)?
If you get the Vinyl plug-in, it has some presets. Try 'attic treasure' and I think you'll be pleased with the results.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 08:12 PM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
um, I'm not sure they used vinyl in the 1940s.

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 09:44 PM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nevada City, California
Posts: 499
Some records from the 1940's were shellac on metal base or cardbord base. That plug in is kinda cool. I think it will make a more convincing 'phone filter' than my waves pre-set. I did almost blow my JBLs and my eardrums as I was playing with the vinyl scratch filter. Scratches were set like 75 db higher than signal. Ouch!
Glenn Davidson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 09:50 PM   #12
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: DFW area, TX
Posts: 6,108
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty Ford
um, I'm not sure they used vinyl in the 1940s.

Ty Ford
It was bakelite plastic. I have a collection of 78 rpm records here that my parents gave to me. Bakelite was a very common formulation in that era. That's also what telephones from that time frame were made of. It's a lot more brittle and prone to cracks than newer plastics.

Vinyl is just the name of the plug-in, not to be taken literally.

-gb-
Greg Boston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2006, 10:07 PM   #13
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
That's what I thought. I have compared vinyl to bakelite. Bakelite is harder and the 78 rpm disks turn much faster than 33 1/2 rpm vinyl. Although the frequency response of the earlier systems was not as good as later systems when 33 1/3 rpm vinyl disks took over, the 78 rpm bakelite I heard had a lot more attack. I still have some of those 78 rpm disks.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Ty Ford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2006, 05:20 AM   #14
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ty Ford
That's what I thought. I have compared vinyl to bakelite. Bakelite is harder and the 78 rpm disks turn much faster than 33 1/2 rpm vinyl. Although the frequency response of the earlier systems was not as good as later systems when 33 1/3 rpm vinyl disks took over, the 78 rpm bakelite I heard had a lot more attack. I still have some of those 78 rpm disks.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Reminds me of when I was a teenager a friend had a marvelous jazz album in her collection called "Bix and Trum." Bix Beiderbecke and Trummy Young jamming together. The term "album" really meant "album" because each track was on one side of a 78 and the whole set came in a book rather like a photo scrapbook with a folder-pages to hold the individual records.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2006, 09:00 AM   #15
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Posts: 2,323
Of course! Never thought of it that way, but i have some of them as well.

Regards,

Ty
Ty Ford is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:17 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network