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Old March 11th, 2007, 06:51 PM   #1
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How are the mics?

Hi

I need to buy a couple of wireless lav systems for a cooking show I've been
shooting which is destined for the web. I've pretty much narrowed the choices
down to Audio Technica ATW's or Sennheiser Evolution G2's. I've noticed in going through some of the threads here that a lot of people mention upgrading the mics that come with lower end transmitter/receiver sets. So my question is: How are the mics that come with these? Should I budget for mics as well? If so how much $$? I know that the final determining factor will be my own ear, etc., but would appreciate some feedback on this. I've been renting Lectrsonic sets but they're a bit out of my price range for purchase. I'm shooting with a V1.

thanks!
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Old March 11th, 2007, 10:08 PM   #2
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I have two sets of the Sony UWP series. One came with the stock lav and I thought it was fine. For the second lav I bought a Sony ECM-77 BMP and I was surprised at how much better it was. This mic retails for about $279 US. So, as with many things, the more you spend, the better the quality.

If I had stuck with only one set I am sure that the original lav would have been fine for the sorts of work I do (weddings for friends, etc.). However, having heard the quality of a better mic, there is no question for me that it makes quite a difference.
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Old March 12th, 2007, 05:42 PM   #3
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Flavors of Audio Technica ATW series-

Thanks for taking the time to reply Curt. I have a new question:
I'm really leaning toward the Audio Technica systems but on the
B&H site there are like eight different flavors of it with six being
exactly the same price. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...rch&Q=&ci=9450 Can somebody tell me the difference between the ATWR100X Receiver and the ATWR100 Receiver? What's the x for? Also some come with a cardiod lav and others with an omnidirectional lav, I don't know the benefits of one over the other for a lav.

many thanks-
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:39 PM   #4
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B&H is not always on top of things. Call AT in Stow, OH and ask to speak to the customerr service dept. They are very good.

The cardioid lavs are frequently VERY sensitive to wind and popping. I have one and seldom use it. A good omni is better.

Regards,

Ty Ford

PS: The U100 are being phased out
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:56 PM   #5
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Thanks so much Ty for your response. Will check with Audio Technica directly to see what the x indicates. Possibly, from what I can see in the specs, it uses a different range of frequencies. Do you know what the U100 is being replaced with if it's being phased out? Would the fact that it's being phased out keep you from considering it?

Also found this on the AT site regarding my omni vs cardiod question:
"Omnidirectional lavalier microphones work well in most situations and are more popular than directional types. Except when external noise is a problem, this type of microphone is easy to use and provides excellent sound quality. Directional lavalier microphones are useful where feedback is a potential problem, where the external noise level is high or where reverberation and echo are troublesome. However, they tend to change in sound quality and level if the wearer turns his or her head away. "
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Old March 13th, 2007, 07:35 AM   #6
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If you'll be operating in the same geographical area (not moving from city to city), choosing a frequency range that has more open frequencies where you are is a good idea.

Here's a link to an AT page that confirms that X is a different range.
http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/si...931/index.html

You might want to bookmark it if you travel and need to know if there are TV stations that will stomp your wireless gear.

The U100 will be around for a while. This was info I got from AT a few years back when the DTV was changing the landscape of RF. I was concerned they had heard something from the FCC that indicated the frequencies I was using would be unusable for wireless. There was a lot of concern about that sort of thing back then. I think it's settled down a bit.

As long as the frequencies work for you, I don't think you need to worry.

I own a U100 butt plug, two body mics and two receivers. I've had them for over six years, maybe eight. I have sent the transmitters back once each for a tweek during that time. I use Countryman mics; EMW, B6 and E6.

AT U100 story: There we were in the dining room of the Dirksen Building on Capitol Hill in DC for a shoot. DC has so much RF in the air it's ridiculous. We take the house audio feed and as soon as we put the camera on AC power, we get a ground loop. Several attempts to fix it failed.

I took the U100 body mic and a lav up to the podium and taped it up next to the podium mic. With my fingers crossed and holding the receiver and listening with headphones (having a headphone jack on the receiver is a very helpful feature), I walked back to our spot. Fine...for over an hour with no hits. I've never held my breath that long before.

I used the U100 on a film shoot for a trailer last year and when they had the screening, I was very satisfied by how well my tracks sounded. U100 and Countryman EMW mics.

Mics make a BIG difference in the performance of a wireles system.

When I win the lottery, I'll get a couple of Audio Ltd. wireless, if they are still as good as they are now, or if nothing else equivalent but less expensive exists. I demoed the Audio Ltd. Envoy a few years ago and was stunned by how good it sounded.

I have started on my review of the AT 1800 dual dual diversity receiver. That's not a typing error. The receiver is a double receiver with two diversity receivers in one box.

I just submitted my Lectrosonics SMQ review to Pro Audio Review. The 250 mW give you more range than the U100 or 1800.

More later.


Ty Ford

Regards,

Ty Ford
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Old March 13th, 2007, 12:41 PM   #7
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Hey Ty- Good info and good story. Thanks! With these units going for half the MSRP it's looking like a no brainer.

best

Mark
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