Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 13th, 2007, 11:46 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 87
XLR Stereo vs XLR Mono and JVC HD110U

Ok, sorry if this is elementary, but I'm confused.

Is a 3-pin XLR cable mono or stereo? A 5-pin?

Whats the difference between 3 and 5-pin XLR?

Most mics are mono, right?

And, last, the JVC HD110U has two XLR inputs. But in the pics, I see what looks like a switch between them. Can only one be live and recording at once?

If so, and if XLRs are really mono, then you'd only be able to get one mono signal to your tape, unless you mixed some signals together pre-camera, right?

Obviously I'm missing something. Sorry for all the questions. Please help me out.

Brian :)
Brian Orser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2007, 06:43 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,715
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Orser View Post
Ok, sorry if this is elementary, but I'm confused.

Is a 3-pin XLR cable mono or stereo? A 5-pin?

Whats the difference between 3 and 5-pin XLR?

Most mics are mono, right?

And, last, the JVC HD110U has two XLR inputs. But in the pics, I see what looks like a switch between them. Can only one be live and recording at once?

If so, and if XLRs are really mono, then you'd only be able to get one mono signal to your tape, unless you mixed some signals together pre-camera, right?

Obviously I'm missing something. Sorry for all the questions. Please help me out.

Brian :)
3-pin XLR's are typically balanced mono, though since 'XLR' refers to the connector and not its use there can be exceptions. A 5-pin XLR is often used on a stereo mic with balanced outputs such as the AT825, 815 or 835 mics, with a pair of pins used for each balanced channel and the 5th pin as a common ground. The 5-pin XLR connects to a 'Y' cable with 2 conventional 3-pin XLRs on the other end, one for each channel, L&R

The JVC cam records 2 separate channels, normally thought of as stereo L&R, at once. XLR 1 goes to channel 1 and XLR 2 goes to channel 2 and you'd plug a separate mic, or the stereo split from a stereo mic, into each connector. However the switch you observe allows you to disconnect the XLR 2 connector and instead send XLR 1's input to both channels in order to make it easier to record dual-mono without requiring an external splitter. This is often done as an insurance track with mono dialog, the primary track set to normal level and the insurance track about 6 or 8 dB lower so that in case a sudden loud sound drives the primary track to distortion or clipping you have an undistorted lower level version to substitute in post.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2007, 08:47 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 87
Excellent Steve. Exactly what I needed to know. Thanks for your help.

Brian
Brian Orser is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Omega Broadcast
(512) 251-7778
Austin, TX

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 




Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:37 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2014 The Digital Video Information Network