Sweetening up audio at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 26th, 2007, 05:07 PM   #1
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Niagara Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,121
Sweetening up audio

I have some boring audio (male speaker) that I would like to fatten up to get more resonance and depth - any suggestions?
David Delaney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2007, 05:21 PM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
This is a job for EQ. For more body and resonance, boost the fundamentals. These should be somewhere around 300 Hz, depending on the speaker.

One approach is to apply a very narrow, tall peak, and sweep it until you find the critical frequency. Once you've found it, widen the bandwidth, so it's not too resonant, and adjust to taste.

You can also pull out really low frequencies to ensure you're not flopping the speakers about, and to tame p-pops.

You can also boost the "sizzle" from 5k to 15k. Not too much, or you just get noise and hiss.

Make sure not to cut too much around 1200. That's where the consonants live.

Many prefer to use EQ to cut, rather than boost. Sharp cuts are acceptable. Sharp peaks sound resonant and are annoying.

You can add a bit of reverb to smooth out the voice, but err on the dry side. I typically add no reverb to voices.

If you want a bigger than life sound, a great trick is to clone the track and compress the heck out of it. Mix to taste. The uncompressed track might sound thin, but has crisp dynamics. The compressed track will sound full, but lacks punch. By mixing them, you can get the best of both worlds.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2007, 01:57 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
If you want a bigger than life sound, a great trick is to clone the track and compress the heck out of it. Mix to taste. The uncompressed track might sound thin, but has crisp dynamics. The compressed track will sound full, but lacks punch. By mixing them, you can get the best of both worlds.
I have heard of this before...but never tried it. Can you define compress the heck out of it a bit more. What type of settings would I be looking for??
Thanks
Mark
Mark Slade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2007, 02:19 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
I typically go with 20 & 20. That is 20:1 compression and a -20 dB (or, maybe -25 dB) threshold. The result is really full, and really dull. Mix in the uncompressed audio to get some of the sparkle back. I then put the two through a single bus with a scooped EQ.

I don't do this for typical dialog. This is for a bigger-than-life movie trailer sound.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2007, 06:46 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 121
Thanks Jon. I have a project starting next week that I'll try it on...
Mark
Mark Slade is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:19 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network