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Old February 22nd, 2005, 03:17 PM   #1
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Handheld Work?

I am just wondering if the Mini35 can be used handheld and in motion or only on locked down shots. I've read about how sturdy the Mini35 rig is, I just wanted to hear of some of the first hand accounts from various Mini35 users. Would you use it while walking or moving with the camera, or does this introduce vibrations into the picture?
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Old February 22nd, 2005, 11:16 PM   #2
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I did a lot of handheld work on my feature film shot with the mini35 and I found it to be very steady. I didn't really notice any more camera shake then with normal video lenses. The first thing I did was to pad the base of the unit so the hard metal bars wouldn't be digging into my shoulder. Just wrapping some foam around it did the trick. I found it a pleasure to use handheld. Much nicer than a normal DV setup. More weight=smoother shot
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 01:25 AM   #3
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No problems with the Mini35 handheld, mechanically speaking. The XL series is probably best as the system provides the forward viewfinder mount; the DVX (and, I would imagine, the Sonys) create a significant problem in that you can't pop the system on your shoulder and still get your eye in the LCD or the rear eyepiece. An on-board monitor positioned at the side of the mattebox is a pretty good way to go. I'm having an interface box built that will allow the use of the Canon black and white viewfinder (for the XL series) with any other camera.
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Old February 24th, 2005, 12:25 PM   #4
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On one short I shot, I was running, full blast down a hallway, around a corner, and jumping down three stairs with the full mini/zeiss lenses/xl2. I had it popped on a shoulder mount we carry from http://www.steadybrace.com/ and that helped a lot.

All in all, the shot ended up looking great. Equipment was as steady as you'd hope.
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Old February 24th, 2005, 04:22 PM   #5
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Ive shot a fair amount of handheld with the DVX/mini35 set up.
I have not experienced any problems with movement or vibration affecting the image beyond what you would expect to see from the movement itself. Ive shot some pretty frenetic stuff.

I can tell you that the DVX/Mini35 set up does not have very good ergonomics for handheld work. Even with a shoulder rig and a forward attached LCD monitor, the bulk of the wieght is on your arms. It tires you out fairly quickly, and is not as steady as it would be if the weight were more on your shoulder.

Without the shoulder rig and after market monitor, handholding the set up is uncomfortable, and difficult.

Its the nature of the beast.

The mini is well built and the lenses it is made to take advantage of also add weight. The DVX is fairly light.

The XL series is probably better for handheld work with the system, but I have no personal experience with that.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 07:17 PM   #6
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Steadybrace

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric MacIver View Post
On one short I shot, I was running, full blast down a hallway, around a corner, and jumping down three stairs with the full mini/zeiss lenses/xl2. I had it popped on a shoulder mount we carry from Steadybrace.com - Video Camera Shoulder Support Steady Brace and Brackets and that helped a lot.

All in all, the shot ended up looking great. Equipment was as steady as you'd hope.
I just got a Steadybrace XR and can't say enough good things about it! It has a frontal support beam that allows you to put the weight of the camera on your chest and shoulder, rather than your arms. I'm shooting some commercials for a local church and this thing has been a life saver! Thanks to the poster who recommended it!
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Old March 8th, 2009, 06:01 PM   #7
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I am using a mini35c on a JVC HD200, along with some zeiss lenses. I have used the rig on my shoulder lots of times and everything came out right. I guess, if that is what you are asking, the ground glass doesn't seem to bother a little bit more of shaking, as it this is what it does mainly by itself :)
This camera has a great shoulder pad that the mini35 doesn't cover so thats a plus. The grips of the mini help too. Though the weight of the whole rig won't let you shoot for hours. And it feels front heavy.
I am mainly using a Glidecam for moving the rig around, and if I want the handheld look I just dodge the pole a bit more. It is more comfortable as it spreads the weight to the whole body and you can film for longer periods (still not forever as we adding up kgs..)
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Old March 8th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #8
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I can endorse the comment relating to the Canon XL and JVC GY-HD--- versions with the forward viewfinder. The JVC I found especially friendly as the viewfinder can be relocated lower and furthur forward on top of the Mini35 body.

I am a bit fragile in the wrists and elbow joints from a lot of childhood falls. I was shortsighted at the time and did not see subtle things like edges of retaining walls and stuff like that until I got older.

I found with a CP16 "on the shoulder" film camera and with the Mini rig, I was anxious that it not get away by rolling off my shoulder to the right and overpowering my right hand. In my case but it might suit others, I found myself using the short handle on the right and the long arm with handle on the left.

I also tended to lower the left arm right down to give me some pendulum ballast, leverage over the horizon and if I had to grab it in a hurry. I also rested the left handle down on the upper "Michelin" of my ample gut which made for a steadier static shot.

My favourite would be to have both the normal short left handle and the longer left arm with handle or pad on the left side but it is not my rig so have not done this.

Last edited by Bob Hart; March 8th, 2009 at 10:04 PM. Reason: error
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