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Old July 29th, 2006, 04:24 PM   #1
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D2x Lense Series via Nikkor Mount

I have a friend who purchased a Red Rock Micro 35, and he was talking about lenses etc.. I mentioned Nikons new cameras and the D2x lenses he said there was talk about the d2x lenses not working on the nikon mount or not compatible with the adapter? Is this true or just fluff?
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Old July 30th, 2006, 04:12 PM   #2
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I think you mean DX lenses. DX lenses are made for digital SLRs only and have a smaller FOV.
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Old July 30th, 2006, 05:04 PM   #3
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I just got a D50, and from what I hear a lot of the new lens would not likely be able to be used on a 35mm DOF device because there is an electronic control for aperature. Most lense can switch to manual focus so for zooms you have your manual focus and zoom control but without aperature you'll run into problems i would think. Its a loss of control and where ever the last camera left it, thats where it stays I think.

The Dslr lenses though are the same FOV as older lenses. If it says 50mm, its a 50mm lens - while on a dlsr it might act more like a 75mm because of the crop factor, but if it says 50mm its not a lie.
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Old July 31st, 2006, 04:12 PM   #4
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You can't use them because of the FOV. It is smaller on the DX lenses because they are made to be used on DSLR only. Put a DX lens on a 35mm adapter and you will see the edges are blurred out greatly. You would have to crop the sides alot.

It doesn't matter that the aperature is closed because you can open it by sliding a lever on the back of the lens.
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Old August 1st, 2006, 08:24 PM   #5
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I was talking with the people I got my camera from and sounds like your right Kyle that for full frame 35mm still film your right.

Well, here's the little thing that I'm thinking almost everyone has forgotten.

A film frame in a still camera is 35mm x 26mm approximately, a film frame from a motion picture camera is 24mm x 18mm which is pretty much the size of a DX sensor.

So in a sense designing a DOF device for a 35x26 frame is incorrect to reproducing the same DOF and more specifically FOV of a film camera since its not the right size. Film in a still goes sideways and is therefore much larger than the vertical moving motion picture camera frame size. But as people found out with Genesis, is that the DOF that people want for digital is not a direct translation because film is 10-15 times thicker than the photosensitive imaging layer giving it a much thicker focal plane. So it gives the DOF effect that most people like better, so larger frame means more light and more area so its better.

So From a technical standpoint, if the DOF device is design for true motion picture film frame the size of a DX lens is fine.... Since I dont' think anyone designed for that than the DX lens will be have very dull light around the edges.
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Old August 2nd, 2006, 10:26 PM   #6
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I have used a Nikon 12-24mm f4 zoom on a adaptor which is set up for a 24mm x 18mm frame.

I am even able to zoom back to a wider frame of about 30mm wide but you begin to pick up corners. You can achieve some really wild distortions at this width and the combinations of camcorder zoom and the lens zoom give you some versatility.

It is seriously useful in tight indoors situations.

Strangely, performance is better in artificial lighting than in outdoors lighting with lots of contrast. Outdoors, especially against the light source, there is always some area of particular light intensity in the image where groundglass defects become evident ( home made spinning groundglass )

The limitation of this lens is more about the f4 aperture. When I bought it, I had misread the available aperture on the data sheet due to poor close-up eyesight. The man who opens and closes the till either had not the skills or did not see fit to enlighten me as to my error.

The aperture actuator lever inside the lens mount on the rear has to be wedged fully open for it to work.

I suspect other digital-only lenses with available f1.8 aperture will work okay for the 24mm x 18mm frame but don't take my word for it. They may vignette sooner on tighter apertures than a film camera lens.
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