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Old January 18th, 2007, 01:01 PM   #1
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Which lenses and what speeds?

I'm trying to put together a good lens kit for my SGPro.

I'm having difficulty finding a lot of fast Pentax lenses, and I was wondering what are some acceptable speeds for lenses? I plan on getting a 50mm f/1.4 but wasn't sure what others would be good.

Would a 28mm f/2.8 be too slow?
Is a 43mm f/1.9 a good lens? Or is that too close between the 28 and the 50?
77mm f/1.8 alright? Should I go with something more around 85mm for a better range? Could I get a lens speed in the f/2.0-3.0 range that would work as well?

Should I look into the 100mm+ range as well?

And is there anywhere good to pick up used lenses other than eBay in the US?

Any comments or help are greatly appreciated!
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 06:51 PM   #2
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After reading around other forums..here is what is suggested by one for Nikkor lenses. Don't know about canons.

Good:
Nikkor 20mm F2.8 = Super Wide
Nikkor 35mm F1.4 or F2.0
Nikkor 50mm F1.4
Nikkor 85mm F1.4 or F1.8 = Closeup
Nikkor 105mm F1.8 = Closeup
Nikkor 180mm F2.8 ED = Sharp DOF

Avoid:
Nikkor 24mm = But F2.0 maybe used
Nikkor 50mm
Nikkor 105 F2.5
Nikon "E" Series
Nikkor "DX" Series

Look into camera shops, pawn shops or even Craigslist.
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Old February 27th, 2007, 08:54 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Lee
After reading around other forums..here is what is suggested by one for Nikkor lenses. Don't know about canons.

Good:
Nikkor 20mm F2.8 = Super Wide
Nikkor 35mm F1.4 or F2.0
Nikkor 50mm F1.4
Nikkor 85mm F1.4 or F1.8 = Closeup
Nikkor 105mm F1.8 = Closeup
Nikkor 180mm F2.8 ED = Sharp DOF

Avoid:
Nikkor 24mm = But F2.0 maybe used
Nikkor 50mm
Nikkor 105 F2.5
Nikon "E" Series
Nikkor "DX" Series

Look into camera shops, pawn shops or even Craigslist.
For the Avoid Nikkor 50mm..it is for F1.8 or above
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Old February 28th, 2007, 06:00 AM   #4
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The faster the lens the more light it gives.The better you can focus. F1.2 is the fastest. (very expensive also) . As a guide go for a 50mm , than a 28mm than a 80mm after than a zoom lens(28 - 80). After getting all this lenses you will be covered.

You will not be using more than f2.8, anymore than this, you will be pushing the camera, light will be a factor here.

28mm is consider as the standard wide angle. if you want to go wide, try putting a cheap W.A lens that has x0.8 to 0.6 in front of the 28mm lens. But you will lose F-stops (light). Spend $ on this lens, don't save, you will you this alot.

Any wider then 24mm (lower than 24mm) Also know as "super wide", and you will start to see some vignetting.They might give you some form of distortion.

Just for thoughts:
f1.2 has the best bokeh a 35mm lens can give. You cannot compare the bokeh of a f2.8 or a f1.8 to a f1.2. .So why are people complaining about "Bokeh" in 35mm adapters. It not the adapter. it the lens that you are using.

Go for the lenses with the lowest F-stop number than you can afford.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 08:58 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by David Chia View Post
So why are people complaining about "Bokeh" in 35mm adapters. It not the adapter. it the lens that you are using.
That's not entirely accurate.
The imaging element (GG, plastic, holographic glass, whatever) plays a large role.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 09:03 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Jon Wolding View Post
That's not entirely accurate.
The imaging element (GG, plastic, holographic glass, whatever) plays a large role.
Jon has made a good point here, and I think itís important to note. In the adapter world, we seem to misuse the term 'bokeh' to describe the adapters output of the out of focus area's. Now, Bokeh is of course a by-product of the 35mm attached, but depending on the ground glass/image element used, the adapter will 'render' this bokeh in different ways.

This misuse of the term can cause confusion, especially when someone says 'wow, that adapter has great bokeh.'

We really should use the term 'bokeh' to describe what it should - the out of focus areas produced by the 35mm lens.

We should start using a term like 'bokeh rendition' to describe the adapters ability to render that bokeh as it should, meaning, how the bokeh would look if the lens was connected to a film camera.

I think its important to recognise the difference between these 2 seperate things and not to get the 2 mixed up.

The general aim in designing a 35mm adapter is to get the 'bokeh rendition' to match that of film as closely as possible, with as little lightloss as possible.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 01:00 PM   #7
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Zack,
Start with a fast 50mm, f1.4 is perfect. The faster lenses tend to cost much more, are harder to focus, and aren't as sharp fully open. I would also suggest a nice wide angle. 20mm is wider than most camcorder stock lenses so it makes a nice addition to your kit, and addds value. Master the 50mm before you step up to anything longer. Trust me, trying to follow focus with 50mm is hard enough. Good Luck, Chuck.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 01:39 PM   #8
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Thanks for the input - it helped a lot!

I'm getting a
50mm f/1.4 Pentax AF
85mm f/1.8 Pentax SMC
and 28mm f/1.8 Sigma Aspherical II

to start and I'll keep an eye out for a 20mm and/or zoom for the near future.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 01:55 PM   #9
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Zack,

Im glad you have the 28mm f/1.8 Sigma Aspherical II, I have the Canon FD version, very sharp lens!
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Old February 28th, 2007, 02:24 PM   #10
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Zach:

I'm starting to use Pentax K mount lens as follows:

SMC Pentax M 135 MM 3.5
SMC Pentax M 50mm 1.4
SMC Pentax M 28mm 2.8

I am also playing with a Takumar 28-80 mm zoom.

I actually shot my DVC7 film using the 50 and 28 mm and my FX1 as my first try. Bedroom scene is 50mm, and the fireplace scene is 28mm, if I recall right..... Here is a link if you want to see it:

http://www.makeyourfilm.net/ForgottenWMVlrg.wmv

By the way, I am using a self built disk spinner, based on redrock plans...
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Old February 28th, 2007, 07:50 PM   #11
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There is an 8mm f3.5 lens which can be had for Nikon mount. The Nikon adaptor has to be requested. The lens is the Peleng 8mm Fisheye (late edit change).

For the standard motion picture frame of 24mm x 18mm it provides full coverage. For the 35mm still-image camera frame of 36mm x 24mm there is a hard edged vignette.

This lens is converted for film industry mounts in the US.

There is an outfit called Rugift which sells them via the internet. The lens is comparable to Nikon's own for image quality.

It is very useful in confined spaces for shots like a seated console operator and his console screen all being in the one shot with someone in background looking over the operator's shoulder.

Last edited by Bob Hart; March 1st, 2007 at 05:33 AM. Reason: Error in original post - failed to mention "Fisheye".
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Old March 1st, 2007, 01:59 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Jon Wolding View Post
That's not entirely accurate.
The imaging element (GG, plastic, holographic glass, whatever) plays a large role.
The 35mm lens is the first thing that creates the bokeh of the image. and i believe the lens plays the crucial part.
There is a comparision of a f1.4 and f1.8 canon lenses of bokeh at f2

here is the site:

http://photo.net/equipment/canon/ef50/
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Old March 1st, 2007, 09:29 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by David Chia View Post
The 35mm lens is the first thing that creates the bokeh of the image. and i believe the lens plays the crucial part.
There is a comparision of a f1.4 and f1.8 canon lenses of bokeh at f2

here is the site:

http://photo.net/equipment/canon/ef50/
David, that's fine and dandy for regular photography, but for 35mm adapters, the focusing screen is what changes the most and so it is what we see as the main determinate of the quality of the bokeh.

Here is a frame shot with a Beattie focusing screen, a screen known for its poor "greasy" bokeh qualities (notice the lights):
http://www.holyzoo.com/content/35mm/...o_Thumb_06.jpg

Regardless of the quality of bokeh rendered by the lens, the focusing screen isn't diffuse enough to render these bokeh discs properly. In the 35mm adapter world, the ground glass plays the crucial part--becaue if it isn't diffuse enough in the first place, no matter what lens you use it'll still look like poo.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 03:59 AM   #14
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"For the Avoid Nikkor 50mm..it is for F1.8 or above"

I read an article linked from this site that said the F1.8 Nikkor was a great lens.

It is really hard to find anything but the F2.5 at 105mm so I am stuck with that.
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Old March 22nd, 2007, 04:57 AM   #15
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There is nothing wrong with the f2.5 on the 105. In fact I have one of the Pre-AI ones NIKKOR-P but it takes beautiful photos. I just need to convert it to AI status to use on my D70s. As for the 1.8 on the 50mm...there are plenty of 50mm F1.4 since it was the stock lense for a lot of cameras in that era.
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