View Full Version : GL2 Filter Size.


Joshua Wachs
July 25th, 2002, 02:10 PM
My GL2 will be arriving shortly.

I neglected to order a filter for lens protection.

What size do I need and shall I get a UV one like on my SLR or some other type?

Barry Goyette
July 25th, 2002, 03:22 PM
The filter ring is 58mm. I'm not a fan of protective filters myself, as I feel they unnecessarily degrade image quality. I would recommend a circular polarizer. It will ad some increased control over saturation, and reflections. Additionally, due to this camera's lower sensitivity (as compared to the gl1, and xl1s) it might make a better option as a neutral density filter (as opposed to the camera's internal filter) in full sunlight.

Barry

Joshua Wachs
July 25th, 2002, 03:38 PM
Would you leave the polarizer on all the time?

Barry Goyette
July 25th, 2002, 04:02 PM
No, but it could probably be used almost all the time in daylight situations. Again I'm not in favor of putting anything in front of the lens if it's just there to protect the glass (that's what lens covers are for), as that extra glass means extra dust, reflections and flare.

However if you like to handle your camera roughly, and lose your lens caps like I do..then you might want to consider a skylight, or UV filter for protection. A friend of mine just smashed an L-series lens into a wall in spain...the filter took the brunt of it, so obviously they have purpose (although he still hasn't managed to get the filter off!).

Barry

Jeff Donald
July 25th, 2002, 04:28 PM
Have your friend post here and I'll be happy to instruct him on how to safely remove his broken filter. I removed 20 to 30 broken filters and haven't lost a patient yet.

Jeff

Frank Granovski
July 25th, 2002, 05:11 PM
Schwachs,

I'd sooner have a UV filter on the camcorder to protect the lens. Some 35mm still purists suggest otherwise, but I've noticed they often sell their lenses for a new one, because they always develop small nicks and scratches over time. This is why I have to be so careful when I buy used 35mm lenses for my cameras. And the trouble is, if your GL2 lens gets damaged, how the heck are you going to replace it? It's going to cost big time money to do this. Lesson: keep a filter on your cam. It's much cheaper to replace a scratched filter than it is a lens.

Frank,
www.dvfreak.com
www.8palm.com

Jeff Donald
July 25th, 2002, 05:47 PM
In over 20 years in the business as both a professional still photographer and videographer I've never scratched a lens and I do not use filters unless the scene calls for a filter. This recent thread might prove interesting
http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2809

Barry,
filters do prove useful in your friends case. But I find, like you, filters degrade the image. If the guys at Canon, who design these great lenses, guys with Phd after their name, who know more about optics than I could ever know, if they thought their great optics needed protection you'd think they would build it in to the lens design. But it's not necessary. However, some people will feel more comfortable with a UV filter on the front. That's fine if it gives them a little added comfort. But they will never know what their camera is truly capable of producing.

Jeff

Frank Granovski
July 25th, 2002, 06:19 PM
jtdonald,

You're right of course. I've never scratched a lens on my old rangefinders---which don't have a lip or threads for a filter. You're a pro, I presume. You're careful. I'm careful too. But the horror stories from people I know and what I read, it's better to be safer than sorry. And you're right about getting better video without a filter, under certain conditions. In the studio I rent, I take my UV off, for slightly better results. But I'm careful. Many people aren't.

Joshua Wachs
July 26th, 2002, 03:39 PM
If for no other reason, I like to leave on a filter on my lenses when I travel. Airport security has more than once touched one of my lenses with their less than pristine fingers to confirm that nothing was hidden in the camera. Ug.