View Full Version : New JVC GY-HM70 AVCHD Camcorder


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Scott Kase
March 11th, 2013, 05:39 PM
not sure this is right spot for this since, I saw and shot with the new full size shoulder mount JVC GY-HM70 AVCHD Camcorder today at the JVC WPPI Booth# 1473 at MGM in Vegas. 1995.00 MSLP. Some Features 1080/60P, 1/2" Cmos Imager, Manual or Auto control. Also has option to shoot at 300fps.

Note from Admin: See http://www.dvinfo.net/news/jvc-sets-new-standard-for-affordable-production-with-gy-hm70-camcorder.html

Tim Dashwood
March 11th, 2013, 05:45 PM
$2000 SRP. It looks a bit like the HM100 and HM700 had a baby. Brochure PDF (http://pro.jvc.com/pro/attributes/CAMERA/brochure/GY-HM70_Catalog_0228.pdf)

1/2.3" CMOS sensor
F1.2-5.6 Iris
1080i60/50 or 1080p60/50. No 24p
AVCHD recording up to 28Mbps
no XLR input (1/8" stereo jack only) so likely no +48V phantom power
It seems that the microphone shown is not included. It is model MZ-V10 and plugs directly into the 1/8" jack.

Jody Arnott
March 11th, 2013, 10:33 PM
50/60p, shoulder mount and 300fps look great, but surely no XLRs would put most professionals off buying this?

If JVC brought out a camera like the HM600//650 with 50/60p and a shoulder mount, I think they'd have a winner.

Ed Arszyla
March 12th, 2013, 11:25 AM
JVC always seems to fall short of what professionals want. So close, but so far.
I agree about a shoulder mount 600/650, but JVC can't seem to take a hint.

Glen Vandermolen
March 12th, 2013, 05:43 PM
Give JVC time. I'm sure they have a shoulder mount HM600-ish camera in the works.
The HM70 has very low resolution EVF and monitor.

Randy Johnson
March 12th, 2013, 06:11 PM
JVC Professional Features page (http://pro.jvc.com/prof/attributes/features.jsp?model_id=MDL102207)
What do you think? Looks like JVC is competing with Sony's NEX 50. I like this one better with the exception of the missing XLRs

Chris Harding
March 12th, 2013, 06:27 PM
Hi Randy

Wow I think not a competitor for the Sony EA-50 at all... I have always admired JVC and their gear is always professionally built and full of features but seriously this camera looks like it is made in a toy factory. I guess it will be OK for schools and such but that's about it! It's a closer rival to Sony's cheap shoulder mount MC2000 camera which also has just a single sensor and no XLR's

Chris

Randy Johnson
March 12th, 2013, 08:55 PM
The Sony only has one sensor right? They left out XLR Sony left out ND plus its cheaper. I dont know I want to get a look at it for sure. Sony has interchangeable lenses but the JVCs lense opens all the way to 1.6. I think the Sony is more of a well rounded camera for all users where the JVC seems to be aimed at event work.

Chris Harding
March 12th, 2013, 09:17 PM
Hi Randy

The MC2000 has the same size sensor as the JVC and yes just a single sensor...they are not very good in low light at all but they would be OK for outdoor events. The EA-50 is a completely different camera with a huge APSC DSLR sensor ...mine give me awesome low light performance and clean gain to 24db even with the stock lens at F3.5!! I would suspect that the JVC would need a lot of lighting despite the F1.6 lens indoors ...If you want a sub $2K camera then I doubt whether the JVC would be as good as the Panasonic AC-90 but I might be wrong. For $2,000 the AC-90 is an awful lot of camera and half the price of the EA-50.

What will the JVC sell for???

Chris

John Sirb
March 12th, 2013, 09:41 PM
US 1995 list

Randy Johnson
March 12th, 2013, 10:51 PM
I meant doesnt the NEX 50 have only one chip, at this point I think it all comes down to the quality of "the chip" If its a DSLR type I think this camera would have a lot to offer. It looks more comfortable than the NEX 50 and appears to be a real shoulder mount given it doesnt have inter changable lenses which is huge. On the other hand if the chip is just a CCD or a CMOS on steroids I agree that it is a better version of the Sony MC2000. BTW The low light specs look pretty good but we will have to wait till fall to see I guess or at least NAB.

Chris Harding
March 13th, 2013, 12:02 AM
Hi Randy

It seems to be the same size roughly as the Panny HMC80 and about the same weight too so it just might suit your needs... The EA-50 is a lot lighter and suits my tired old body better!!
I'm really pleased to see that manufacturers are doing new event cameras again!! I moved from panny simply because they had no more shoulder mounts in the near future ... This gives event shooters a better option now. Are you looking seriously at this camera ? It really looks good value for what you get!!

It should give the Panasonic AC-90 a run for it's money too ...we will have to see what low light footage looks like at higher gains.

Chris

Zach Love
March 13th, 2013, 08:39 AM
If JVC brought out a camera like the HM600//650 with 50/60p and a shoulder mount, I think they'd have a winner.

Have you seen the HM700 series cameras? 720p60 shoulder mount, been selling since 2009.

I don't see the point of doing shoulder mount unless you can do inter-changable lenses too. The HM600 has higher resolution CMOS (1920x1080) vs the CCDs of the HM700 (1280x720), so possibly just put the CMOS of the HM600 into the HM700. Call it... HM800?

Is that what you're looking for?

If not, what are the HM700 series cameras lacking that the HM600 / 650 have? Do you want a shoulder mounted fixed lens camera?

Randy Johnson
March 13th, 2013, 10:25 AM
Well if the quality is right I am, I like almost everything about it except for XLRs which can be solved with a beachtek box. Now if your right and this just a normal old one chip camera that will shoot it down right there but if I can get pictures comparable to the NEX 50 I am in.I am hoping that the NEX 50 will set the mold for a new batch of affordable high quality film like cameras. I guess I will find out in May if this is one of them.

Steve Struthers
March 13th, 2013, 11:28 AM
The very low-res EVF and LCD display suggest to me that JVC simply ripped out some of the guts of the HM100/150 cameras and then plopped them into a big shoulder-mount body, slapped in a 1/2.3"
sensor and called it a professional camera.

It strikes me as a bit of an odd beast that doesn't really compete with any of the lower-end shoulder-mount options from Sony and Panasonic.

About the only thing it has over the Sony HXR-MC2000 is a larger image sensor (1/2.3" vs. 1/4"). And Panasonic's HMC80 would probably outperform the JVC even with its three 1/4" CMOS image sensors.

Cameras like the HM650/700 excepted, I've always tended to see JVC as somewhat of an also-ran in the video equipment business -sort of a 'day late and a dollar short' kind of thing.

Zach Love
March 13th, 2013, 12:33 PM
I wonder if the 1/2.3" is a misprint. Brochure says lens is listed as 3.76mm on the wide end w/ a "29.5mm" FOV 35mm equivalent. The math doesn't add up. 3.76mm on a 1/2.3" chip is extremely wide.

As is listed a 1/2.3" chip is in between a 1/2" & 1/3" chip.

According to AbelCine's FOV calculator a "29mm" FOV 35mm equivalent on a 1/2" camera (Sony EX1) is 5.6mm, on a 1/3" camera (JVC HM600) is 4.2mm & a on 1/4" camera (JVC HM150) is 2.3mm

My guess is the chip is 1/3.2". That would be much closer for the 3.76mm lens to give you a 29.5mm FOV 35mm equivalent.

If this is true, you have a larger chip than the JVC HM150 but smaller than the HM600.

---

My other initial impressions are:

I love that JVC releases high resolution photos when they release a camera. Keep it up JVC.

No XLR inputs? Really limits the use of the camera.

Optical zoom is only 10x. But 16x is painted large on the side. I wonder how good "Dynamic zoom" really is.

I like that the lens hood has a built in (flip down) cover. Every camera should have these, I don't understand why some manufactures haven't caught on (*cough Panasonic *cough Canon)

Why is there a cable from the viewfinder down the camera? It doesn't look removable, so why aren't those connections just run internally through the handle? I'd think that cable might get annoying sticking right out in front of your nose.

f/1.2 is nice, stinks that it drops down to f/2.8. That's a lot of light you lose through the zoom (espicially for just a 10x lens). Though I think I've seen worse (but it is on 20x to 22x zooms).

Why is the HDMI on the side & not on the back w/ the RCA jacks? Is there anyone that needs HDMI at that position instead of at the rear.

Overall, I think if I had to choose this or a HM150, I'd go with a HM150 in a heart beat.

Randy Johnson
March 13th, 2013, 04:33 PM
The article I read about it said it uses the same chip as this camera
JVC GY-HMQ10 4K Compact Handheld Camcorder GY-HMQ10U B&H Photo

I for one am excited I do weddings (currently with a AG-HMC 150) and I would love a shoulder mount camera, The mini jack doesnt bother me I will just get a beactek box. I dont really need interchangable lenses. Im hoping they are throwing there hat into the Sony NEX 50U ring where it will have the image of a DSLR in a affordable shoulder mount camera.

Zach Love
March 14th, 2013, 12:24 PM
I find it hard to believe that they'd stick a 4k chip in the HM70.

The HM70 seems like it is trying to compete with a Sony HXR-MC2000U, or Panasonic AG-AC7 or HMC80.

Though it would be nice if JVC released a shoulder mounted, interchangeable lens, 4k camera. Even a chip of 1/2.3" with those specs would be exciting. Even nicer if it had a larger chip.

Randy Johnson
March 14th, 2013, 07:49 PM
Well from the article I read they are but you need to understand they can put that chip in it but it doesnt mean its as good as the other camera. I mean they may have made this camera because they had a lot of those chips lying around but theres a lot more to it than just dropping in a chip.

Scott Kase
March 15th, 2013, 05:03 PM
I shot with the GY-HM70 in the JVC booth this week at the WPPI Show in Las Vegas. Very Impressed with the picture quality. Having built in dual battery System(hot swapable) and Dual Memory is helpful.

Chris Harding
March 15th, 2013, 07:19 PM
Hi Randy

I also doubt it as it would kill the HMQ10 sales. Why pay $5K for one when you can get the 70 at less than half the price. It certainly looks like it's targeted towards the educational market and possibily the entry event market and would be a direct competitor with the older HMC80 (which has XLR's) or the cheaper Panasonic AC7

I wonder if you just might be a little disappointed with it after your HMC150?? They also wouldn't fool with trying to make it compete with the HM700 series either which have IMHO, the nicest form factor of all as it totally balanced with the SM pad further forward but sadly the 700 has a low res and tiny EVF much like the 150 (like looking in a tunnel) It's about time they went the Sony route and put in a decent LCD and loupe... Once you have used that EVF system you are spoilt for life!! Even the HMC80 has the same but the LCD is lo res.... I think the Sony EX-3 was the first to use the idea and that wowed me and I enjoyed the big viewing area ... the EA-50 has the same except the monitor is hi-res so you get an awesome image to work with.

There is obviously a market for sub $2K cameras otherwise the MC2000, HMC80 and AC-7 would not still be in production and this certainly might be a contender for events!! If your budget is under $2K then it looks like it's the pick of the bunch

Chris

Paul R Johnson
March 16th, 2013, 08:04 AM
Blow the spec - that's one ugly looking camera! It also looks very army wearing to hold. It isn't a shouldermount camera, it just has one end hooked on your shoulder, the rest of the weight is very far forward.

Randy Johnson
March 16th, 2013, 10:23 PM
Like I said it CAN have the chip doesnt mean its going to have the specs theres a lot more to image quality than the chip itself.ie you can put a ferri engine block in a Ford but without the rest its still a Ford. Now from the way it looks I think the Sony looks awkward to hold on the shoulder, although I havent tried it yet but the viewfinder looks like it comes back to far to be comfortable and that the whole thing is front heavy (not just from the weight). but like I said thats just from what I see I bow to Chris's experience on that one.

Zach Love
March 19th, 2013, 09:49 AM
Randy, do you have a link to where you read the HM70 & the HMQ10 use the same chip?

I'm not saying the HM70 doesn't have the same chip, I just think it doesn't add up. The biggest thing the the focal length of the lens & the FOV they say it has.

If the HM70 has the same 4k 1/2.3" chip as the HMQ10, & it only gets a "29mm / 35mm FOV" at a 3.76mm focal length, then the camera isn't ready a lot of the chip. Kind of like the crop mode (ETC / electronics teleconvter) on the Panasonic GH2 or GH3. Only, again, my estimated math, things don't add up.

In the GH series ETC / crop mode, the camera only uses the center 1080x1920 pixels. If you do that with the HMQ10 you get a 1/4.6" chip. With a chip that small, a 3.67mm lens isn't going to give you that 39mm 35mm FOV equivalent.

A 3.67mm lens on a 1/4.6" chip is going to be almost a normal FOV (40-50mm FOV range in 35mm equivalent terms).

Chris Hurd
March 19th, 2013, 10:31 AM
It isn't a shouldermount camera, it just has one end hooked on your shoulder, the rest of the weight is very far forward.

Lots of camcorders are like that today -- Canon XL H series, Sony EX3 and others -- I'm not saying it's right, but JVC shouldn't be singled out for this. All of the major manufacturers are responsible.

Chris Hurd
March 19th, 2013, 10:35 AM
do you have a link to where you read the HM70 & the HMQ10 use the same chip?

I'll tell you what's better -- we'll get a yes or no confirmation direct from JVC.

A link to some other site proves nothing, sorry. There are a few sites out there that I won't allow links to because their "data" is highly questionable. DV Info Net was built on getting solid info direct from original sources. In this case the source will be JVC itself... a simple check of the published specs at JVC give an immediate indication that it's NOT the same chip as the GY-HMQ10U. To wit:

JVC GY-HM70 -- 1/2.3" 12M pixels progressive scan CMOS (official source) (http://pro.jvc.com/prof/attributes/specs.jsp?model_id=MDL102207&feature_id=03)

JVC GY-HMQ10U -- 1/2.3" 8.3M pixels back-illuminated CMOS (official source) (http://pro.jvc.com/prof/attributes/specs.jsp?model_id=MDL102132&feature_id=03)

Adam Grunseth
March 20th, 2013, 05:34 PM
Despite its lack of obvious features like XLR, I am very excited about this camera. I am gearing up to do multi-camera live HD production. A true high def studio camera is out of my reach financially. Looking to do things in as affordable way as possible, this camera is looking great!

I don't need a camera with on board sound as my audio is all being done separately. The same goes for 24p recording. Though it is nice feature, my video switcher will only do 720p or 1080i at standard broadcast frame rates, so no 24p. So for me, this camera seems to be exactly what I am looking for.

Randy Johnson
March 21st, 2013, 12:40 PM
Heres where I read it.
JVC Announces New $2000 Shoulder-Mount GY-HM70 | Studio Daily (http://www.studiodaily.com/2013/03/jvc-announces-new-2000-shoulder-mount-gy-hm70/)

I wonder it were are starting to get past a time where one chip cameras can be considered for professional production. I know back in the day one chips gave poor color reproduction ie reds looked purple but maybe the one chips are getting good now to. Maybe not we'll see.

Chris Hurd
March 21st, 2013, 01:27 PM
Well, there were two flavors of single-chip camcorders. The more common variety had a complimentary color filter which sacrificed color accuracy for lower noise. The less common and significantly better variety had a primary color filter whose color accuracy nearly equaled a three-chip. An improved DSP (digital signal processor) alleviated the image noise issue.

These days nearly all but the cheapest 1-chip camcorders have an RGB primary color filter. Consider also that just about all of the big high-end digital cinema cameras (RED, et al) are single-chip.

Petter Flink
March 21st, 2013, 03:35 PM
Heres where I read it.
JVC Announces New $2000 Shoulder-Mount GY-HM70 | Studio Daily (http://www.studiodaily.com/2013/03/jvc-announces-new-2000-shoulder-mount-gy-hm70/)

I read that was well.
My first idea were that the HM70 used one of four sensors from the Q10 and the Q10 did used four sensors merged which created their own data stream, hence the four SD cards.
But then I read about the single 1/2.3" both cameras is said to use, but the Q10 uses a 8.3MP sensor and the HM70 uses a 12MP sensor so my wild ideas went down the drain.

My guess is that the JVC rep and/or the studiodaily.com people just mixed something up.

Chris Hurd
March 21st, 2013, 04:19 PM
My guess is that the JVC rep and/or the studiodaily.com people just mixed something up.

Hard to say, but I'll check with the product manager about this at NAB.

Petter Flink
March 22nd, 2013, 12:53 AM
Hard to say, but I'll check with the product manager about this at NAB.

Could be as simple as the JVC rep said "same sized sensor" which turned into "same sensor" in print.

Zach Love
March 22nd, 2013, 04:47 PM
So I think it is pretty obvious that the chip in the HM70 isn't the same as the HMQ10. But I was still bugged by the quoted size of the chip & the FOV, so this is what I think is going on.

JVC specs say:


Image sensor 1/2.3" 12M pixels progressive scan 1CMOS
Recording area Video 5.4M to 2.07M* pixels

....

* The 2.07M is when "Dynamic Zoom: ON."


So....

At 5.4M, with a 16:9 ratio, you have a native resolution of approximately: 3010x1743

At 2.07M, with a 16:9 ratio, you have a native resolution of 1920x1080

So it looks like that is how they get 16x out of a 10x zoom. It appears after you've run out of the 10x optical zoom, the camera starts cropping the chip from 3010x1743 to 1920x1080 for the rest of the dynamic zoom. Meaning when you have dynamic zoom enabled, you're not losing any resolution. (This is of course in theory, it'd be interesting to see how this looks in reality.)

When you use the 200x digital zoom, you're going to lose some image resolution (like any other camera with digital zoom).

Now a standard 1/2.3" is 6.17mm x 4.55mm. The aspect ratio is 4:3, which means 12M = 4000 width x 3000 height, and each pixel is then 0.0015mm x 0.0015mm.

If the pixel is 0.0015mm, then the active area of the sensor is

4.65mm x 2.61mm for 3100x1743, which is slightly smaller than a 1/3" sensor

2.88mm x 1.62mm for dynamic 1920x1080 is about the size of a 1/6" sensor

The numbers I pulled off the internet break down to this as standard sensor sizes:
1/3" - 4.8mm x 3.6mm
1/3.2" - 4.54mm x 3.42x
1/4" - 3.2mm x 2.4mm
1/6" - 2.4mm x 1.8mm

These are all 4:3, & I'm assuming the HM70 is 16:9, so the sensor active areas don't match up 1:1.

If all my math is correct then, the HM70 has a 1/2.3" chip, but only uses an active area slightly less than a 1/3" sensor, and as little as a 1/6" sensor when dynamic zoom is enabled.

My conclusion & personal opinion: I think JVC is giving misleading information to say this camera has a 1/2.3" chip, when a lot of that area isn't used.

Steve Struthers
March 23rd, 2013, 10:08 AM
Zach Love says:

"If all my math is correct then, the HM70 has a 1/2.3" chip, but only uses an active area slightly less than a 1/3" sensor, and as little as a 1/6" sensor when dynamic zoom is enabled."

And if your math is correct, Zach, then this should mean that we will see some deterioration of the image when the camera is zoomed in beyond 16x. 1/6" is pretty tiny, and I wonder sometimes how any camera manufacturer manages to get even halfway-decent images with a sensor size that small. I know that Panasonic and a couple of others have offered cameras with such small imagers - virtually all of them consumer-grade models.

Thomas Smet
March 24th, 2013, 06:02 AM
Guys this is nothing new. Panasonic has been doing this for awhile now. Even the GH2 has its extended tele mode where it will use the center 1920x1080 area of the chip.

What you get are basically two forms of digital zoom. One that never gets lower then 1920x1080 resolution and the other that works like a traditional digital zoom. No professional in their right mind uses digital zoom unless there is just to other choice and it fits a very specific reason.

Even the first zoom option that gets you from 10x to 16x may have a slight loss of quality. Not so much in terms of raw pixels but the fact that the image is no longer down sampled from a higher resolution chip which helps mask noise and improve detail by sub sampling. This is why it is a special. For the most part it should still look great and match what a normal video camera will look like while potentially if you stick within the 10x range it may look a bit cleaner and sharper.

If you stay within the 10x zoom range you should get a nice down sampled image that equals the noise free methods DSLRs use. Nothing misleading there at all. Think of it as a 10x zoom camera with a still great option to use up to 16x. No person after that considers digital zoom a quality feature.

Also take into consideration optical low pass filtering. DSLRs do not have this optimized for video because they need the detail for stills. A video camera on the other hand will be filtered to be optimized for video. So you may in fact get detail just about equal between 10x and 16x so they may be able to think of 16x almost as good as the 10x.

Check out some Panasonic consumer cameras to see exactly how this mode looks.

Zach Love
March 24th, 2013, 09:11 PM
My main point of what is misleading is this:

1/2.3" CMOS chip, but less than 50% of the area of the chip is actively being used. In my opinion, you should advertise the size of the chip that actively makes video & not include any of the inactive area.

To me it is like selling a Ford Mustage with a V8 engine, advertise that it has a V8 engine, but don't clearly mention that 4 valves actually move the vehicle while the other four do squat.

Paulo Teixeira
March 25th, 2013, 07:26 PM
This has been going on with a lot of cameras in the past. One example is the Panasonic X920 advertising the chips being 1/2.3 while it's implied that only a smaller portion of the chips is used for video.

Anyway, I sort of have mixed feelings over this. It's double the price of the PX100 (http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/digital-video-industry-news/513295-procision-jvc-gc-px100-camcorder-announced-ces2013.html) and doesn't add 24p or XLR inputs which is why I think it's few hundred dollars too much but on the other hand it does have dual battery slots which can come in handy for some applications.

Steve Struthers
March 29th, 2013, 03:14 PM
Hi Randy

The MC2000 has the same size sensor as the JVC and yes just a single sensor...they are not very good in low light at all but they would be OK for outdoor events. The EA-50 is a completely different camera with a huge APSC DSLR sensor ...mine give me awesome low light performance and clean gain to 24db even with the stock lens at F3.5!! I would suspect that the JVC would need a lot of lighting despite the F1.6 lens indoors ...If you want a sub $2K camera then I doubt whether the JVC would be as good as the Panasonic AC-90 but I might be wrong. For $2,000 the AC-90 is an awful lot of camera and half the price of the EA-50.

What will the JVC sell for???

Chris

Actually Chris, the Sony MC2000U has a single 1/4" sensor, while the JVC has a 1/2.3" image chip.

Yes, with just a 1/2.3" sensor, the JVC would need a lot of light to produce really clean images.

Currently, B&H in New York are selling the JVC for $1995, but it won't be available until May 15.

Given the small image sensor it has, and the fact that its EVF and LCD displays are quite low-res, I doubt that JVC will be able to command a price of $1995 for long. But this is nothing new, because camera makers always run the price up the flagpole on release to see what the market will bear, and adjust price downwards if sales don't justify the initial price. As an example of this kind of pricing behaviour, look at what happened to Sony's NX30. When it was released, it was selling for close to three grand. To get the camera to move off the shelves, Sony had to cut the price by almost $1200.00.

Non-professionals who want something better than a does-it-all-on-automatic consumer camera are quite price-sensitive, as reflected in the virtual explosion of new, low-end prosumer cameras coming in around the $2000.00 mark.

I'm thinking once initial sales figures are in, the price of the JVC HM70 will probably settle somewhere close to what the Sony MC2000 is selling for - that is to say, somewhere between $1499 and $1699. My estimation is that it's nowhere near competitive with Panasonic's AC90, which is a hell of a lot of camera for the money (and now selling for $1799 at B&H, amazingly enough). Now, that said, the HM70 will probably fly off the shelves at $1499 ~ 1599 and into its intended market - wedding and event videographers, schools and businesses with small equipment budgets.

Chris Harding
March 29th, 2013, 07:06 PM
Thanks Steve

I did realise the the 70 chip is only a tiny bit bigger than the Sony ... My only point directed to Randy was that he might be a little disappointed with the low light performance after an HMC150 but I know Randy is hankering after a shoulder mount camera! I do agree the the weight distribution will be an issue ..with a shoulder pad right at the back and no counter balance it will be a beast to carry around all day and the physical size looks awkward too ...I shifted from my HMC80's simply because I'm getting old and weary and my back was killing me after 12 hours at a wedding with an 8lb camera ...that's why I moved to Sony's new EA-50 as it a LOT lighter and much lower profile and you can actually hang stuff off the back to balance it better ....just the 2lbs or so less weight makes a huge difference!!

Most cameras seem to be released at a slightly higher price and then are adjusted quite quickly so they fit into a competitive slot ...I can certainly see the HM70 being a very popular educational/film school camera and would suffice too for outdoor events or low end weddings ...At the usual wedding reception venues that are very low light a decent on-camera light would be an essential.

Chris

Tom Van den Berghe
April 10th, 2013, 01:11 PM
Hard to say, but I'll check with the product manager about this at NAB.

Anybody tested this camcorder at NAB? I'm very interested in some footage of this camcoder.

Tom Van den Berghe
April 11th, 2013, 11:30 PM
ok, I found these 2 links from NAB 2013 about this new camcorder,

NAB 2013 - JVC GY-HM70 - YouTube

and

JVC GY-HM70 at NAB 2013 - YouTube

So, anyone else tested this camcorder?

Shufiyan Shukur
April 12th, 2013, 04:10 AM
No XLR?

- JVC PRO - JVC Professional Europe (http://jvcpro.eu/video/news/1140/new-shoulder-mounted-events-camera-launched/)

Tom Van den Berghe
April 12th, 2013, 05:13 AM
NO XLR but I personally don't need that. At this pricepoint a shouldercam that films 1080p is really good.
I hope the lowlight tests will be good.

Tom Van den Berghe
April 16th, 2013, 11:05 AM
really no one tested this camcorder at NAB? strange

Steve Struthers
April 17th, 2013, 03:45 PM
A little while ago in this thread. I predicted that JVC would not be able to keep the price of the HMC-70 at $1995 for very long. Looks like I was right. B&H are now accepting pre-orders for the HMC-70 at $1599, not the original $1995 price they were asking when the camera was first announced. This puts it smack-dab in Sony's HXR-MC2000U neighbourhood, price-wise.

Looks to me like JVC got some early market feedback on the HMC-70 and decided to drop the price.

In any case, it should be interesting to see how the camera performs in real-world circumstances.

Tom Van den Berghe
April 21st, 2013, 04:47 AM
Found a review and test videos on a chinese website. You can also download the original testvideos!
I'm very impressed with the picture quality. Low light looks very good to me.

高性价比肩扛摄像机 JVC JY-HM85评测_JVC JY-HM85_摄像机评测-中关村在线 (http://dv.zol.com.cn/362/3622189.html)

Randy Johnson
April 22nd, 2013, 02:20 PM
$1999 was the list $1599 is the street price.

Tom Van den Berghe
June 11th, 2013, 11:50 AM
I called a the local videostore here in Belgium. The GY-HM70 (E) will be in Europe at the end of june but is already sold out! The next of shipping will be in the middle of july!

Hope It will be sooner in the US for some reviews here .

Tom Van den Berghe
June 21st, 2013, 08:52 AM
the first review of this camcorder

Good Price, Even Better Imagery: JVC?s GY-HM70 Is A Low-Cost, Highly Capable Camcorder | www.creativeplanetnetwork.com (http://www.creativeplanetnetwork.com/dv/feature/good-price-even-better-imagery-jvc%E2%80%99s-gy-hm70-low-cost-highly-capable-camcorder/63044)

I ordered earlier this week mine one. After reading the review I'm glad I did it.

Tom Van den Berghe
June 29th, 2013, 12:11 PM
Sooner as expected my HM70 arrived in the store. Today I bought it!
I could choose beween this JVC and a demo model from the sony NEX-EA50

The sony was not for point and shoot so I choosed the JVC. But I was curious to seet he sony.
The sony was better balanced on my shoulder but I found it a strange build camcorder. A bit ugly.

The build quality of the JVC is more plastic feel but I found the sony also.

I did a quick test between the JVC and the sony HXR-NX5 (my older camcorder) at home
I set the AGC limit to 12db on the sony and the both looked the same amount of noise in low light.
That's a result that makes me happy.

Will upload some videos soon.