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AVCHD Format Discussion
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Old December 14th, 2007, 01:04 PM   #31
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Mark - I burned a full 8 gig memory stick, from the camera to my mac, to a DL dvd, then popped it in the PS3. It played perfectly (takes the PS3 about a minute to sort the clips before it will play properly - after that, it's great!)

Also, the dual layer DVD also works fine as a way to bring these files into FCS. So it seems the dl will be my archiving system for 8 gig sticks, and sl dvd for 4 gig sticks.

Paul - I'm very curious about how you are getting the files to be read w/o going thru the camera. I have tried many times - as have others on these boards - and cannot get the files to be properly recognized by FCS unless they are copied from the cx7 in it's usb dock.

I've tried to bring these files in directly from the memory stick in a usb memory stick reader - with no luck. I will try your technique of copying the files first from the memory stick to the hard drive and then try to import them.

Cheers,
Chuck
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Old December 14th, 2007, 01:25 PM   #32
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Paul - I tried your technique and it worked! Thanks so much for this excellent shortcut. Who knew you had to do a "double click duplicate" in order to get the files to copy over properly on a mac? (Well... obviously you did...)

Cheers,
Chuck
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Old December 14th, 2007, 05:58 PM   #33
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Paul and Chuck:

Thanks - I tried Paul's technique and it seems to work well! I did a straight drag and drop (not duplicate) of just a AVCHD folder from a copy of a 4GB mem stick (entire file structure and mem stick info etc) on my WD portable HDD (connected by USB) into an "untitled" folder on the desktop. FCP 6.0.2 recognized the clips straightaway. I am away from my MacPro at the moment and using an intel iMac (2.16 Ghz processor, 2GB RAM) and found that adding clips to the queue causes FCP to crash. I don't know if this is because the computer is not powerful enough or something else? I don't know if anyone else has experienced this problem.

Other than this, thanks Paul for the technique which works great. Now I don't have to carry that camera dock (and charger) when traveling!

Roger
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Old December 14th, 2007, 06:01 PM   #34
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"Also, the dual layer DVD also works fine as a way to bring these files into FCS. So it seems the dl will be my archiving system for 8 gig sticks, and sl dvd for 4 gig sticks."

Chuck: I don't have this DVD burner...yet. If I burned a sl dvd of my 4 gig stick, will FCS recognize the DVD in log and transfer when I pop it into the DVD tray of my Mac? (I don't have blu ray or PS3). I like the DVD way of archiving. Thanks.
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Old December 15th, 2007, 02:41 PM   #35
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Keeping it steady?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Garcia View Post
I spent a lot of time working out what type of support (tripod etc) I would need for this small camera in order to reduce handheld shake and to maintain portability. I finally settled on the Manfrotto modo series - I use the small monopod with the tilt head addition, a great set up as I can also attach a flat bracket to hold the camera and a Rode mic (plugged in through the Sony AIS adapter) when needed. And more recently I have been using the Manfrotto modo steady, their version of the smaller steadicams. The advantage of the modo steady is that unlike the monopod, it folds up (to about 7 inches) and fits into the small bag I keep the CX7 in when shooting. It can also be converted into a shoulder brace, and also as a table top tripod (not that useful but you never know).
Thanks for reading!
Hi Roger

I really enjoyed reading your post. One area that caught my attention was regarding camcorder stability. Reading many posts consumer reviews about the CX7, stability can be somewhat of a difficulty based on the fact the the CX7 is small and because of the high def compression, it has a hard time dealing with stability. SD camcorders of the past fared much better in this area.

I have looked into various methods from the Merlin, varizoom flowpod, steadystick, and the manfrotto modo steady 585, which is I believe you referred to.

I have contemplated taking the CX7 back in exchange for the Canon HG10, but I just love this little guy. It takes incredible video, the build quality is outstanding, and I much prefer flash memory over hard drive. Hard drives can crash (heaven forbit half way into a vacation), plus you don't have to contend with the noise that can be picked up from hard drive units.

Stability is a prime concern for me. The little jiggles you get trying to hand hold the CX7 can be a bit annoying. The merlin and the varizoom flowpod use a devise called a gimble. Aparently it affords great stability, but at a high price. The merlin runs for around $800 and I believe the varizoom flowpod is about $500. The Manfrotto modo steady 585 seems like a good choice for much less money. I would like you thoughts please regarding it's ability to iliminate those little jiggly motions you get while hand holding. Does it work as well as it's advertised? Thank you for you help.
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Old December 15th, 2007, 02:47 PM   #36
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Keeping it steady?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Garcia View Post
I spent a lot of time working out what type of support (tripod etc) I would need for this small camera in order to reduce handheld shake and to maintain portability. I finally settled on the Manfrotto modo series - I use the small monopod with the tilt head addition, a great set up as I can also attach a flat bracket to hold the camera and a Rode mic (plugged in through the Sony AIS adapter) when needed. And more recently I have been using the Manfrotto modo steady, their version of the smaller steadicams. The advantage of the modo steady is that unlike the monopod, it folds up (to about 7 inches) and fits into the small bag I keep the CX7 in when shooting. It can also be converted into a shoulder brace, and also as a table top tripod (not that useful but you never know).
Thanks for reading!
Hi Roger

I really enjoyed reading your post. One area that caught my attention was regarding camcorder stability. Reading many consumer reviews about the CX7, stability was somewhat of an issue based on the fact the the CX7 is small and because of the high def compression. SD camcorders fare much better in this area.

I have looked into various methods from the Merlin, varizoom flowpod, steadystick, and the manfrotto modo steady 585, which is I believe the one you referred to.

I have contemplated taking the CX7 back in exchange for the Canon HG10, but I just love this little guy. It takes incredible video, the build quality is outstanding, and I much prefer flash memory over hard drive. Hard drives can crash (heaven forbit half way into a vacation), plus you don't have to contend with the noise that can be picked up from hard drive units.

Stability is a prime concern for me. The little jiggles you get trying to hand hold the CX7 can be a bit annoying. The merlin and the varizoom flowpod use a devise called a gimble. Apparently it affords great stability, but at a high price. The merlin runs for around $800 and I believe the varizoom flowpod is about $500. The Manfrotto modo steady 585 seems like a good choice for much less money. I would like you thoughts please regarding it's ability to eliminate those little jiggly motions you get while hand holding. Does it work as well as it's advertised? Thank you for you help.
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Old December 15th, 2007, 04:39 PM   #37
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Wayne: Thanks. I think that whatever support device one uses, it's important to practice and find the most comfortable positions for hand held shooting while realizing that you probably should not hold the camera for the most part as you would a heavier camera etc.

For actual handholding, for example, I often cradle the camera in my left hand (thumb on the AIS cover and the body of the camera in my palm). I rarely hold it up to my eye level (an almost sure recipe for shake because the camera doesn't have an eye piece and it's a kind of an unnatural position to hold the camera up and look at the screen) and when I do I make sure my elbow is pressed into my body. I am also conscious of my body position (it's not only in the hands and arms but the whole body is a kind of tripod). For more "static" shots I look for support such as leaning against a wall etc). I think we are all aware of these techniques (I learned mine from still photography) but using the light-weight CX7, it pays to remind oneself of them : )

Before using the Modo Steady (and the Modo monopod which I also recommend), I did not notice the jiggles that have been mentioned in posts. They are most likely there but probably in lesser number because I have been practising hand holding positions.

Yes I'm using the Modo Steady 585 and unlike the Merlin, it doesn't have a gimble but it does have adjustable weights. There is some minor shake but with short practice I have managed to reduce it. I tried the Modo for about 10 minutes before having to shoot with it and I was pleasantly surprised at how steady the sequences were. This has to do with some experience of using the camera and knowing how to handle it but also of course with the Modo itself. I did not try really complicated moves with it - just walk intos and out ofs the subject, pan from one person to another (I was filming an interview) - no high shots, no low shots, and it was all usable. I subsequently did some more walking shots, high and low shots (basically raising my arm up and down!) and those also seemed OK to me. I think if one is aware of what the Modo can and cannot do then it will serve your camera well. (I think you can't turn and twist it around etc like a Merlin - but my experience of the Merlin is very limited.) As far as I can see you probably would not get the really smooth gliding shots etc of a Steadicam but you can walk with it and you do get a fairly comfortable and good support for the CX7. In part I also realize this is because the Modo 585 adds some weight and a "pistol grip" to the camera that must add to its stability.

If you can it's worth trying out the Modo first in a camera store before buying to see if it fits your style. And if that is possible, bring your camera with you for the test as well!
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Old December 16th, 2007, 04:53 AM   #38
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How About 16GB and 32GB Memory Sticks?

Sony has been talking about 16GB and 32GB Duo-sized Memory Sticks in the next year. Does anyone know if the CX7 would accept them?
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Old December 16th, 2007, 06:00 AM   #39
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The DvMultiRig Pro is nice for use with the CX6 too. I have the rig for may larger cameras but it definitely makes a big difference with the little CX6 too.

I've attached some pics.

http://www.dvmultirig.com/

PS: It's good fun using the sub-machine gun configuration, although you might want to refrain from that near any airports or other sensitive areas!
Attached Thumbnails
Sony HDR-CX7-up.jpg   Sony HDR-CX7-down.jpg  

Sony HDR-CX7-sub.jpg  
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Old December 16th, 2007, 06:51 AM   #40
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Good advise

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Garcia View Post
Wayne: Thanks. I think that whatever support device one uses, it's important to practice and find the most comfortable positions for hand held shooting while realizing that you probably should not hold the camera for the most part as you would a heavier camera etc.

For actual handholding, for example, I often cradle the camera in my left hand (thumb on the AIS cover and the body of the camera in my palm). I rarely hold it up to my eye level (an almost sure recipe for shake because the camera doesn't have an eye piece and it's a kind of an unnatural position to hold the camera up and look at the screen) and when I do I make sure my elbow is pressed into my body. I am also conscious of my body position (it's not only in the hands and arms but the whole body is a kind of tripod). For more "static" shots I look for support such as leaning against a wall etc). I think we are all aware of these techniques (I learned mine from still photography) but using the light-weight CX7, it pays to remind oneself of them : )

Before using the Modo Steady (and the Modo monopod which I also recommend), I did not notice the jiggles that have been mentioned in posts. They are most likely there but probably in lesser number because I have been practising hand holding positions.

Yes I'm using the Modo Steady 585 and unlike the Merlin, it doesn't have a gimble but it does have adjustable weights. There is some minor shake but with short practice I have managed to reduce it. I tried the Modo for about 10 minutes before having to shoot with it and I was pleasantly surprised at how steady the sequences were. This has to do with some experience of using the camera and knowing how to handle it but also of course with the Modo itself. I did not try really complicated moves with it - just walk intos and out ofs the subject, pan from one person to another (I was filming an interview) - no high shots, no low shots, and it was all usable. I subsequently did some more walking shots, high and low shots (basically raising my arm up and down!) and those also seemed OK to me. I think if one is aware of what the Modo can and cannot do then it will serve your camera well. (I think you can't turn and twist it around etc like a Merlin - but my experience of the Merlin is very limited.) As far as I can see you probably would not get the really smooth gliding shots etc of a Steadicam but you can walk with it and you do get a fairly comfortable and good support for the CX7. In part I also realize this is because the Modo 585 adds some weight and a "pistol grip" to the camera that must add to its stability.

If you can it's worth trying out the Modo first in a camera store before buying to see if it fits your style. And if that is possible, bring your camera with you for the test as well!
Hi Roger

From what you say, It's apparent that I'm holding the camera wrong. I have been holding it high like one would most cameras. Sounds like I need to hold it down closer to the waistline with the elbows tucked in like you mentioned.

I did a fig/rig using two camera brackets. It looks somewhat like the unit Paul shows in his post. The combo is long enough where I can tuck one handle tight against my shoulder and hold the other handle with my right hand leaving the left hand free to use the remote control. If I use my left hand on the camera controls I end up moving the camera enough to add those little jiggles. The camera bracket combo seems to work ok, but does require more practice.

I would like to try out the Modo Steady, but I can't locate one in my area. It seems that the only way I can get one to try is to order it online, but I don't want to go through the process of ordering something and having to return it if it doesn't work for me. Because the item is relatively new, it might take a while before the camera stores here carry it.

I think you are right, no matter what method you use, you have to spend time practicing with it to get it right.

Thanks for replying Roger.
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Old December 16th, 2007, 10:38 AM   #41
 
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I'm very confident it will accept 16, but don't know about 32. I'd imagine it would also manage 32.
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