Who do you think the greatest director of all time is and why? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Awake In The Dark
What you're watching these days on the Big Screen and the Small Screen.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 27th, 2006, 06:52 PM   #1
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: denton, texas, usa
Posts: 416
Who do you think the greatest director of all time is and why?

Just thought it would be fun to shoot the bull. I'm really not sure who I'd pick, as there are the ones that "defined current movie language" earlier on in filmmaking (Like Orson Welles), and then there's the ones that "redifined it to what it is currently" like Steven Spielberg. I personally think this . . . .

Greatest Special FX pioneer goes to George Lucas

Greatest "the first time this has ever been done in cinematography" goes to split decision of Orson Welles and Akira Kurisawa.

Best in "showman" storytelling goes to Speilberg.

Best in I'm not sure what, but, he has to be in here somewhere . . . I guess in building suspense? . . . Is Alfred Hitchcock.

How about you guys?
Laurence Maher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 08:42 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
If you base it solely on total volume of classic movies, Hitchcock wins. Nobody can touch him. Best though? That has to be a subjective. For me: Woody Allen.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 10:23 AM   #3
Capt. Quirk
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Middle of the woods in Georgia
Posts: 3,596
Kevin Smith, he's one of us... one of us... one of us...


:)
__________________
www.SmokeWagonLeather.us
K. Forman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 10:38 AM   #4
Kino-Eye
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 455
I'll cast two votes for "not-as-well-know" but brilliant directors working in the contemporary cinema:

Wong Kar-wai (2046, In the Mood for Love, Happy Together, Fallen Angels, Chungking Express, Days of Being Wild, As Tears Go By), style and substance in beautiful balance. In terms of sensuality and lushness, In the Mood for Love is one of the most beautiful love stories ever made in which the environment is as much a character as the actors.

Atom Egoyan (Speaking Parts, Next of Kin, Family Viewing, Exotica, Ararat, The Sweet Hereafter, Calendar), his films have a fascinating structure and style weaving narrative threads with layers of experimental essays that reveal new insights on multiple viewings. A filmmaker's filmmaker, Wim Wenders was so impressed with Egoyan that he gave his prize money won at the Toronto film festival one year to help Egoyan make Speaking Parts.

It's hard to narrow it down but I decided to limit myself two two.
__________________
David Tames { blog: http://Kino-Eye.com twitter: @cinemakinoeye }
David Tamés is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 11:08 AM   #5
Air China Pilot
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 2,389
I hear what you're saying on Wong Kar Wai. "In the Mood for Love", "2046", "Ashes of Time" and "Chunking Express" all belong in a filmmaker's library. But Egoyan has fallen down recently. "The Sweet Hereafter", "Exotica" all show a deft touch and good storytelling. But I can't remember the last one after that that I liked.

For me it has to be Akira Kurosawa. He excelled in so many areas from storytelling, dynamic direction, bringing out performances to the varying scope of his productions. In his career he did everything from commercials to industrial films from psychological stories to film noir to comedy to adventure and huge battles. He not only directed films that mattered only to a select few but he made crowd pleasers. He was an auteur who didn't just keep to one genre but branched out and built bridges between cultures. Let me reel off a few classics of his: "High and Low", "Stray Dog", "The Seven Samurai", "Rashomon", "Ikuru", "Ran", "Throne of Blood", "Derzu Uzala", "Yojimbo", "Sanshiro Sugata".

I will suggest another filmmaker who I think lives in Kurosawa's shadow. That is China's great director Zhang Yimou. Zhang Yimou may be trying to establish himself as a martial arts director ("Hero", "House of Flying Daggers") now but prior to that he made three masterpieces in the late 80s and 90s that still evoke awe in terms of composition and metaphor. "Red Sorghum", "Ju Duo" and "Raise the Red Lantern". Totally gorgeous films.
__________________
--
Visit http://www.KeithLoh.com | stuff about living in Vancouver | My Flickr photo gallery
Keith Loh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 01:30 PM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Centreville Va
Posts: 1,828
For me the 2 greatest would be
Stanley Kubrick and Akira Kurosawa. There are many other great ones, but for me, those 2 are the best. I like Hitchcock, but felt he was rather formulaic at times.
__________________
Boycott Guinness, bring back the pint!!!
Joe Carney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 03:44 PM   #7
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Yeah, Hitchcock made the same movie over and over. But it was a real good movie!
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 07:35 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 234
For me, top honors would go to Stanley Kubric...but I'd have to put Akira Kurosawa and Ridley Scott up there in my list of favorites as well. I'm also quite partial to Francis Ford Coppola's work and, dare I say it, Mike Figgis...but neither approach quite the same level of greatness as Kubric/Kurosawa/Scott.
Duane Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2006, 09:32 PM   #9
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
I disagree! I think nobody tops Coppola for a straight-up drama.

I am heartened to see many of you share my idols.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2006, 11:26 AM   #10
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posts: 8,308
According to my mom, it is me.

However, I'm partial to Stanley Kubric and Akira Kurosawa, who both seem to be popular choices.
__________________
Need to rent camera gear in Vancouver BC?
Check me out at camerarentalsvancouver.com
Dylan Couper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2006, 12:01 PM   #11
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Coppola has had kind of a weird career. The first two Godfathers and "The Conversation" are among my all-time favorite movies. "Apocalypse Now" is great too, but not something I personally would watch over and over. But nothing he's made since even comes close to those movies. It's not that his current work is bad. His movies just don't seem to have the same impact. Interesting nobody has said Scorcese. He's been a lot more consistent over his entire career.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2006, 09:13 AM   #12
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
You have to pretend Coppola retired in 1979.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2006, 09:30 AM   #13
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Belgium
Posts: 2,195
For me it's Steven Spielberg.
I love others too (Lars Von Trier, Sergio Leone, Stanley Kubrick, Wong Kar Wai, ...), but he's my all time favorite. The man has many classic masterpieces on his name, and you really feel he breathes film.
He seems to have a natural connection with film language, he knows how to tell a story, how to put you right in the middle of it, and get you to feel what he wants you to feel.
Mathieu Ghekiere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2006, 11:22 AM   #14
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 103
agree with most of you...
Spielberg, Ridley Scott, Kurosawa, etc...

however, i'd like to mention Wachowski bros. Altho their filmography is very short, i think they're good for groundbreaking VFX and very deep philosophical story...(too deep not many people understand the story tho..)

also James Cameron, Night Shyamalan, Wolfgang Petersen, etc.

i think most box office stands for good direction.
Hornady Setiawan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2006, 02:30 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Europe
Posts: 844
A vote for Ridley Scott and also prob Kubrick.

and it's difficult to argue with James Cameron's consistent success and skill - although i agree that doesn't necessarily make him 'the best'.

Steve Soderbergh i think also is highly talented and makes some great movies.
Stu Holmes is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:22 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network