Best movies to watch to learn filmaking at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Awake In The Dark
What you're watching these days on the Big Screen and the Small Screen.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 23rd, 2007, 09:50 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 27
Best movies to watch to learn filmaking

give some names of movies other people can watch (like me) to learn the art of filmaking

My examples
Cinematography: Citizen Kane
dialogue: Inherit the wind
lighting: Casablanca
actors: Silence of the lambs
script: the usual suspects and american beauty
Etc etc
__________________
XH-A1
Andrew McDowell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 12:22 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 156
A Bug's Live vs. Ants, or Finding Nemo vs. SharkTale for the importance of Story and Character development

Garden State for Cinematography

The Shining for Sound and Cinematography

Epic Movie for everything you shouldn't do.

Primer for story

The Descent for atmosphere

Devil's Backbone and Pan's Labyrinth for just about everything

I could go on and on and on, but I have work to do.
Sean Skube is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 12:42 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
Whats the best dish to eat to learn the art of cooking?

Depends on your interests, tastes, and approach. That's why it's an art.

An easy approach if you are interested, is simply selecting the top academy award winners for each category for the last, say fifty years. That will give you a sampling of what the peers thought of their companions' work. Watch each one for it's particular 'winning' merits, and see how the compare.
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 01:20 PM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
I'm with Rich: study what you like. This question is too vague.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 01:52 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 425
I find the process of directing really fascinating, so when I've really been blown away by a movie, I'll try to watch films by the same director.

Netflix can be really useful for this. If you can spend the bucks, DVD sets of a director's works are great.

Seeing the same director take on different stories, work with different actors, etc is really interesting.
Dennis Stevens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 06:05 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Asheville NC
Posts: 426
Cinematography: The English Patient. I felt like some of the scenes were the actors.

Dialogue: Glengary Glen Ross (Drama) I think Mamet's stage experience gives him an edge, The Big Lebowski (Comedy),

Actors: Ikiru (Never seen a better performance for the lead) It's change your life good.

Script: I'm with you on The Usual Suspects for drama. Strictly Ballroom for comedy.

Epic: I think Titanic was epic. Poor boy, rich girl, love, death, rebirth, sinking ship. I know, I know, it's cliche but I can't help it.

Lighting: I think most movies by spielberg is worth watching for the lighting if for no other reason you don't notice it, you feel it.
Matt Buys is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2007, 10:34 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Toronto Ontario Canada
Posts: 239
Mise en scene: My Darling Clemetine

Lighting and Production Design: Citizen Cane

Cinematography: Ran - Black Stallion

Storytelling: Rashoman

Dialouge: Anything by Mamett ... Let's just cast out House of Games, Spanish Prisoner and the Heist just for examples

Handling actors/performances: Most of George Stevens work
Victor Kellar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2007, 09:42 AM   #8
Trustee
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sauk Rapids, MN, USA
Posts: 1,675
Panic Room 3 disk set BTS
Dead Poet's Society Collectors edition w/ cinematography master class
PJ's King Kong Pre-production Diaries

Every BTS Making of thing ever...stare at what they're doing on set and what they're putting where in relation to the camera. BTS is what netflix is for! You can get the supplementary disks from 2+ disk sets without having to get the movie ;) I buy movies not only based on how much I like them, but who did the commentary and what BTS they have. Unless it's a movie I really like!
__________________
Web Youtube Facebook
Cole McDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2007, 09:54 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Skube View Post
A Bug's Live vs. Ants, or Finding Nemo vs. SharkTale for the importance of Story and Character development
.

I have often thought that I would use Finding Nemo as a textbook example of how to write a good movie script. The editing is excellent, too. I have a six-year-old at home, so have seen that movie dozens of times. I'm constantly blown away by how quickly and engagingly that story moves along. Not a wasted moment in the whole movie.
__________________
http://www.prolefeedstudios.com/blog/
Documentary for the masses!
Brian Standing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2007, 10:03 AM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 621
How to break all the "rules" of filmmaking (at least when you know what you're doing):

2001 - Stanley Kubrick.

First line of dialog: 40 minutes into the story.

The "Film Look": shot almost completely in wide angle, with extremely deep depth of field.

Ambient sound: the most dramatic scenes occur in the dead silence of outer space. No fake "whooshes" like in Star Wars or Star Trek.

Subject matter: Uncompromisingly grown-up, intellectually rigorous science fiction.

Music: No original score, all compositions are classical standards in the public domain.

Scary Villain: a simple glass lens.

Ending: Ambiguous and disquieting. Is it a happy ending? Or not?

I could go on, but you get the idea.
__________________
http://www.prolefeedstudios.com/blog/
Documentary for the masses!
Brian Standing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2007, 10:19 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Berlin and Geneva
Posts: 258
great comment, Brian, 2001 is a mindblower
I would add Godard's A Bout de Souffle to your "breaking the rules" category
Claude Mangold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2007, 10:43 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East London, South Africa
Posts: 31
Unique cinematography: Requiem for a Dream

Collateral
: Movie takes place over +/- 10 hour period and there is no back-story.

_________________________________________________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Standing View Post
Ambient sound: the most dramatic scenes occur in the dead silence of outer space. No fake "whooshes" like in Star Wars or Star Trek.
Where that hatch closed and the sound returns. Spine tingling moment.
Louis Mostert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2007, 04:45 PM   #13
Trustee
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Sauk Rapids, MN, USA
Posts: 1,675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Standing View Post
I have often thought that I would use Finding Nemo as a textbook example of how to write a good movie script. The editing is excellent, too. I have a six-year-old at home, so have seen that movie dozens of times. I'm constantly blown away by how quickly and engagingly that story moves along. Not a wasted moment in the whole movie.
Look farther back:

Disney: Lion King = hamlet

Hate to do it but, Pixar:
Bug's Life = seven samurai
Finding Nemo = pinocchio
Cars = doc hollywood

Monster's inc...haven't found a matching plot yet
Ratatouille, haven't really tried yet.
Toys, I'm sure there's one, but I've refused to look for it.
__________________
Web Youtube Facebook
Cole McDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2007, 03:13 PM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Los Angeles CA USA
Posts: 507
Don't study it, do it.

"I love to eat souffles, therefore I can cook souffles".

"I love Mona Lisa, therefore I can paint Mona Lisa"

Stupid nonsense, no?

"I watch movies, therefore I can make movies"

sound any better to you?

Practice it by doing it. There's no excuse. Tape costs less than books now.
Cameras cost less than film school

In the time it takes to talk about it, and circle around it, you could have done one. It won't be great but it'll be done.

The next time, it will be better, if you can learn at all.

After a while, and a few movies under your belt, it will be... what it will be.

Will people watch it?

Eat a souffle.
Then make one.
Then try and sell the first one you make.
Will people eat it?
Will people buy it?
Chris Leong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2007, 04:06 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Johanesburg South Africa
Posts: 217
Chris ,Just love the way you think.eveytime I read your reply it just makes more sense.
John Dennis Robertson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:40 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network