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Old December 4th, 2008, 01:20 PM   #31
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Hi Khoi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Khoi Pham View Post
Well heck yes, if you tell them that you are going to give them a blu-ray disc, then give them a blu-ray disc, not a dvd disc with half quality HD material on it, DVD media can't sustain 40mb/sec video data rate, all of my BD are VBR with up to 40mb/sec max bitrate for complex high details scenes.
I can understand where your confusion comes from, but in every respect except capacity they are exactly the same. From my perspective, the client's and the organization that set up the blu-ray specification (see the blu-ray faq entry below) its a blu-ray disc. The bit rates I've used are in the 15-20 Mbps range (thats Mbps, not mb/sec.*) and are fully compatible blu-ray files with certificate included. This is the bit rate of many Hollywood movies on blu-ray. Saying the media is different may be a selling point for you, so good luck with that. Considering your investment (for me, on a Mac, it would be $1800 to do customized authoring and burn BR plus nearly 20x's the media cost per disc) you have every right to say there is an advantage to your product.

*Upper Case "B" for Bytes-MB/sec, MBytes/sec, MB/s and MBps means megabytes per second and is used for disk and tape transfer ratings.
Lower Case "b" for Bits-Mb/sec, Mbits/sec, Mb/s or Mbps means megabits per second and is used for transmission speeds in a network or in internal circuits.

"BD9 and BD5 are lower capacity variants of the Blu-ray Disc that contain Blu-ray compatible video and audio streams contained on a conventional DVD (650 nm wavelength / red laser) optical disc. Such discs offer the use of the same advanced compression technologies available to Blu-ray discs (including H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1 and MPEG-2) while using lower cost legacy media. BD9 uses a standard 8152MB DVD9 dual-layer disc while BD5 uses a standard 4482MB DVD5 single-layer disc. BD9/BD5 discs can be authored using home computers for private showing using standard DVD±R recorders. AACS digital rights management is optional. The BD9/BD5 format was originally proposed by Warner Home Video, as a cost-effective alternative to regular Blu-ray Discs. It was adopted as part of the BD-ROM basic format, file system, and AV specifications."
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Old December 4th, 2008, 02:15 PM   #32
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Actually most BD movies average at 29 Mbps with the max around 40Mbps and this is with AVC codec, I have lots of them and that is what it display on my PS3, AVC codec is twice as efficient as MPEG2 HD, now if you are using MPEG2 HD and you max out at 20Mbps then that is where you short change your customer, HD has 5 times the data of SD, if a good standard DVD encoded at 8Mbps, you would need 40Mbps in MPEG2 HD just to not compromise any quality when going to HD.
I don't know why it cost $1800.00 for a BD set up with Mac, but you can get a BD burner for around $300.00, DVDit HD for $300 and a computer and you are set.
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Old December 4th, 2008, 03:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khoi Pham View Post
Actually most BD movies average at 29 Mbps with the max around 40Mbps and this is with AVC codec, I have lots of them and that is what it display on my PS3, AVC codec is twice as efficient as MPEG2 HD, now if you are using MPEG2 HD and you max out at 20Mbps then that is where you short change your customer, HD has 5 times the data of SD, if a good standard DVD encoded at 8Mbps, you would need 40Mbps in MPEG2 HD just to not compromise any quality when going to HD..
I am using MPEG4-AVC. You can go up to 25Mbps but I've kept it at a max of 20. The results are stunning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Khoi Pham View Post
I don't know why it cost $1800.00 for a BD set up with Mac, but you can get a BD burner for around $300.00, DVDit HD for $300 and a computer and you are set.
Because the only DVD authoring solution on the Mac right now is to use Encore, which is bundled within CS4 at $1600. I assume you're not on a Mac? This is the Mac board, so its members are very well aware of the lack of options we have right now. Considering the amount of time it would take to payoff that investment blu-ray on DVD-R is the best solution, especially considering the weak demand.
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Old December 5th, 2008, 09:40 PM   #34
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I have Panasonic BD30 set-top blu-ray player with the latest firmware.

It plays BD-REs I have authored with TMPENc Authoring Works 4 just fine.

However, it errors out and does not play red-laser DVD media burned with the same exact ISO as was burned onto BD-RE.

I agree that at this stage, the more compatibility the better, and it'd appear that this can only be achieved by using normal BD-R media in the first place.

My burner is LG GGW-H20L, and I used Verbatim BD-RE media for my tests.
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